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Væren og Tid

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Martin Heidegger er en af det 20. århundredes største tænkere. Hans hovedværk Væren og tid er blandt de mest betydningsfulde værker i den nyere filosofi og er siden udgivelsen i 1927 blevet en klassiker. Væren og tid omhandler spørgsmålet om værens mening. Heidegger forsøger at skitsere en mulig ny tilgang til den disciplin, der traditionelt analyserer det, der er, med hen Martin Heidegger er en af det 20. århundredes største tænkere. Hans hovedværk Væren og tid er blandt de mest betydningsfulde værker i den nyere filosofi og er siden udgivelsen i 1927 blevet en klassiker. Væren og tid omhandler spørgsmålet om værens mening. Heidegger forsøger at skitsere en mulig ny tilgang til den disciplin, der traditionelt analyserer det, der er, med hensyn til dets mest almene grundtræk. Denne disciplin er ontologien. Væren og tid rækker tilbage i filosofihistorien, idet værket bearbejder centrale spørgsmål hos blandt andre Aristoteles, Descartes, Kant, Hegel og Kierkegaard. Men hvad der er nok så vigtigt: Værket peger virkningshistorisk frem mod Sartres eksistentialisme, Merleau-Pontys fænomenologi, Gadamers hermeneutik og Derridas dekonstruktivisme. Desuden har det haft en uvurderlig betydning for udviklingen af en række andre videnskaber såsom teologi, litteraturvidenskab, psykologi og antropologi. Bogen er forsynet med et fyldigt efterskrift af Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, der ud over at introducere til Heideggers værk og liv gennemgår opbygningen, argumentationsgangen og centrale grundbegreber i Væren og tid. Desuden rummer efterskriftet et overblik over værkets virkningshistorie og en udførlig bibliografi.


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Martin Heidegger er en af det 20. århundredes største tænkere. Hans hovedværk Væren og tid er blandt de mest betydningsfulde værker i den nyere filosofi og er siden udgivelsen i 1927 blevet en klassiker. Væren og tid omhandler spørgsmålet om værens mening. Heidegger forsøger at skitsere en mulig ny tilgang til den disciplin, der traditionelt analyserer det, der er, med hen Martin Heidegger er en af det 20. århundredes største tænkere. Hans hovedværk Væren og tid er blandt de mest betydningsfulde værker i den nyere filosofi og er siden udgivelsen i 1927 blevet en klassiker. Væren og tid omhandler spørgsmålet om værens mening. Heidegger forsøger at skitsere en mulig ny tilgang til den disciplin, der traditionelt analyserer det, der er, med hensyn til dets mest almene grundtræk. Denne disciplin er ontologien. Væren og tid rækker tilbage i filosofihistorien, idet værket bearbejder centrale spørgsmål hos blandt andre Aristoteles, Descartes, Kant, Hegel og Kierkegaard. Men hvad der er nok så vigtigt: Værket peger virkningshistorisk frem mod Sartres eksistentialisme, Merleau-Pontys fænomenologi, Gadamers hermeneutik og Derridas dekonstruktivisme. Desuden har det haft en uvurderlig betydning for udviklingen af en række andre videnskaber såsom teologi, litteraturvidenskab, psykologi og antropologi. Bogen er forsynet med et fyldigt efterskrift af Thomas Schwarz Wentzer, der ud over at introducere til Heideggers værk og liv gennemgår opbygningen, argumentationsgangen og centrale grundbegreber i Væren og tid. Desuden rummer efterskriftet et overblik over værkets virkningshistorie og en udførlig bibliografi.

30 review for Væren og Tid

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Is it unreadable? Yes. Were the 17 words I did understand enough to blow my mind and change my life and understanding of philosophy and being? Yep.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Arjun Ravichandran

    The most important philosophical work of the 20th century, and a text whose influence will still be felt for some centuries to come, I am willing to reckon. Even if you are one of the many detractors, the fact remains that it is simply an outstanding monument to man's ability to think deeply, freshly, terrifyingly, and poetically about himself. Heidegger's main focus is on Being ; what does it MEAN to be? This is of course an old question, stemming from the days of Aristotle, but Heidegger is fo The most important philosophical work of the 20th century, and a text whose influence will still be felt for some centuries to come, I am willing to reckon. Even if you are one of the many detractors, the fact remains that it is simply an outstanding monument to man's ability to think deeply, freshly, terrifyingly, and poetically about himself. Heidegger's main focus is on Being ; what does it MEAN to be? This is of course an old question, stemming from the days of Aristotle, but Heidegger is foremost a phenomenologist (i.e. 'To the phenomena themselves') and therefore refuses any recourse to anything that is outside the scope of what is immediately apparent in the one thing that human beings often overlook, that is to say, human existence itself. This means that the scope of ambition of Heidegger's project is staggering ; he intends to determine WHAT a human being IS, by HOW it is ; and this means that he not only takes on a nearly 2000-year-old philosophical tradition, but also a nearly 2000-year-old deeply embedded conception of what a human being is (and by extension, what a human being should be). It is a provocative assault, which may account for the polarizing reactions that Heidegger seems to evoke. But this also means that Being and Time is a primordially 'humane' book, for it was Heidegger who truly brought the existentialist consciousness to the fore of our developing consciousness as a species. Make no mistake, this is still hard-core philosophy, but it is a book about the many banalities of the average human life, and thus, about the many hidden profundities of the average human life. Appreciate Heidegger's phenomenal (see what I did there) insight into the human condition, and you will never look at life, time, the world, concern, other people, a hammer, language, reality, and death in the same way again. Now for the mandatory words of warning. This book is DIFFICULT. But it is difficult in the way the ending stages of a hard-fought chess game is difficult ; Being and Time' may be difficult, but it is NOT 'boring'. Stick with it, make the effort, and you will not be disappointed. You may even (as happened to me) slowly neglect the other distractions of your life and set aside a solid block of time to tackle the text (for me, 3 months), and not even be aware of anything like a sacrifice being made. You just feel like you've decided to venture a few steps deeper into the rabbit hole, is all. And with regards to the language, I actually love the language in 'Being and Time', leave alone finding it something to rail against. It has a kind of an austere beauty to it, a kind of 'mathematical poetry' if you will. For those who complain that Heidegger could have said what he wanted to say in 'easier' language, the answer is that, NO he could not have. Since his project was a radical rethinking of the nature of human existence, he needed a radically new vocabulary to describe the stages of his project. The usual words like 'soul', 'consciousness', and even 'human being' are too embedded in the tradition he is attacking, and have too much baggage. Once you appreciate this, and read the text with 'fresh eyes', then you appreciate the hidden intricacies of his language, as well as to the depths he takes these new terms too. And finally, this is most definitely not a book that a casual reader can 'dip into' ; this is hardcore philosophy that was meant to overthrow another philosophical tradition. So, these would (in my opinion) be the absolute prerequisites before any reader wishes to pursue 'Being and Time' ; 1)A general knowledge of philosophy and the history of philosophy, and at least a surface-level knowledge of what the major philosophers of the Western tradition had to say about life, the universe and everything. This is important, because this tradition represents 'substance metaphysics' or 'the metaphysics of presence' which Heidegger attacks throughout the entire text ; (these terms simply mean the positing of some kind of unit of 'stable timelessness' that 'stands behind' or 'hangs over' human existence, be it the 'soul', 'consciousness', 'God', 'Atman', 'Will', 'Forms' or what have you). A good introductory book on philosophy should do the trick, and in my knowledge, Will Durant's 'The Story of Philosophy' is still the best way to go, though of course, any equivalent book which goes over the main 'theme' of Western philosophy should do the trick 2)An intuitive understanding of Nietzsche. His influence is present throughout the text of 'Being and Time', because he is the 'bad boy' cousin of Heidegger's who sounded the death knell of traditional philosophy ; a project which Heidegger systematizes, enhances, and pursues. Since Nietzsche is primarily a poet and a cultural critic rather than an actual philosopher (in addition to being a superb writer) a quick crash course of reading his main works (The Gay Science, Beyond Good and Evil, Twilight of the Idols, and if you can stomach the overblown prose, Zarathustra) would do you good here. 3)A good guide to Being and Time ; predictably, for a work of such complexity and importance, several guides have sprung up of varying quality. The one I used was Gelvin's 'Commentary' which is clear, friendly, excited, and straightforward. Everything that you need. 4)A surface understanding of phenomenology ; a Wikipedia search should do the trick, or any such introductory article. If you're seriously gung-ho then 'An Introduction to Phenomenology' by Sokolowski will ground you more than you strictly need to be grounded. And that's it, you're ready to go. This is not a book that you can read once, and I wonder if 'read' is even an appropriate word. For the same reason that you do not 'read' Finnegans Wake, but 'experience' it as if it wasn't a book but a sentient entity which would get insulted if you labelled it as a book, I think the same would go for 'Being and Time'. It is a profound exploration of the most primordial questions a man can ask about anything, and as such, it demands a steady commitment of your time, energy, your curiosity, and the latent profundities that lie within you and which will be awakened as you thumb through the master piece that is 'Being and Time'.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alexandru Jr.

    done. it was like losing my philosophical virginity :) and it feels like everything i have read until now was a preparation for this. including my "dipping" in it for seven years or so. and i'm glad i read (and discussed) augustine's confessions with a wonderful group of people, during a course - otherwise i would have understood nothing at all from the part about temporality. the dynamic of the book is very musical, it seemed to me. drone-like. as if the loooong done. it was like losing my philosophical virginity :) and it feels like everything i have read until now was a preparation for this. including my "dipping" in it for seven years or so. and i'm glad i read (and discussed) augustine's confessions with a wonderful group of people, during a course - otherwise i would have understood nothing at all from the part about temporality. the dynamic of the book is very musical, it seemed to me. drone-like. as if the loooong sounds are repeated and repeated again, creating a texture which changes your "mood" - your "attunement" - making you able to see how a new "ground" is disclosed. of course i can't say anything coherent about it. and i don't think anything coherent needs to be said in this review. there's no substitute for reading it - if you want to understand where contemporary philosophy is coming from.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pooja Kashyap

    Being and Time by Martin Heidegger is an ocean of infinite gems. It is one of those books, which require re-reading only to discern new motifs surfacing up every time. No single review can fully justify the thoughts running throughout the book. I did try jotting down few thoughts but am sure I still have missed some of them, which I might add later after reading it the second time. Coming straight to book, ‘Being’ does not means presence, rather being is time and likewise never really Being and Time by Martin Heidegger is an ocean of infinite gems. It is one of those books, which require re-reading only to discern new motifs surfacing up every time. No single review can fully justify the thoughts running throughout the book. I did try jotting down few thoughts but am sure I still have missed some of them, which I might add later after reading it the second time. Coming straight to book, ‘Being’ does not means presence, rather being is time and likewise never really shows its presence. A being is more than what it actually looks like, its limitation is more than its physical dimension. By defining any object or being as per its usefulness or appearance or even concept is to exaggerate a particular character to give it a grotesque effect. Since, there is always more to what one perceives. Defining never captures the essence of being. Even if we stare a thing, we do not see its complete picture, the wholeness is always missing. There is some part of the object, which is always hidden; Heidegger uses the term “withdrawal” to this phenomenon. Heidegger’s concept of time too is not limited to watch or calendar rather it is a kind of temporality that can be experienced in any single moment. For instance, we use our tools without explicitly noticing them, like hammer. Our radar of focus is the thing we are building than tools or hammer we are using. Even if it (the hammer) breaks, it will remain more than what we are seeing, a broken tool. This implies, the being of hammer is always absent, even if it works underneath the entire building operation. However, the hammer or the things around us, be it trees, candles, table or books are not always absent. Had they been in the state of absence, there would have been no relation between these objects and us. A book for me is a voyage, a learning expedition but the same book for a baby is nothing more than a rectangular thing with pages to fiddle about, thus, the person who encounters an object determines its presence, which again is not the object’s complete picture. Joining the two pieces of the mentioned thought processes together create the two sides of a story. First is, the part of an object that is hidden, to which Heidegger calls “past” and the second, characteristics that make thing present, word used for this is “future”. By combining these two entities, a new form of “present” is born, which is torn between being of things and the physical dimension that is perceived by us. The world is continuously moving back and forth between these two entities; Heidegger has called this endless tossing as “time”. It is with this audacious thought, Heidegger questions the credibility of history of philosophy that till then have limited the objects to their mere presence, thus ignoring the other side, which as per him, completes the entire reality. Modern technology too has reduced the objects merely to their presence by focusing only on the utility functions. According to Heidegger, concept of time is only relevant to beings and not to any inanimate objects. As indicated by his theory, humans are the only entities that exist in the world, rest of the objects do not have access of the surrounding world. Dasein is the German term that has not been translated, which signifies ‘human existence’ or the ‘state of being’ in his entire work. The term cannot be replaced with ‘human being’ since the word is already saturated with lots of conventional theories and prejudices. For instance, human beings are considered higher mammals with rational abilities, creatures that build up structures with the help of tools, advanced African Apes, curious beings that play around with technologies or mortal bodies encasing immortal souls. Heidegger wanted to minus these theories completely, so he created Dasein, which can only be looked with a single beam of philosophical light and character of which is only temporality. Objects like tree, stone, table can have a present-at-hand single physical view but human beings like coin have two-dimensional interplay and this interplay is termed as ‘time’. This thought process of Heidegger’s echoes Critique of Pure Reason, the famous 18th century work by Immanuel Kant. As stated by Kant in "first critique," philosophically, discussing things as they are have no bottom line. Limitations of humans with respect to their experiences are one of the major hurdles in defining the actuality. It is beyond the understanding of humans to comprehend something to its completeness. For example, humans cannot comprehend whether space and time can exist independent with respect to themselves (humans). However, they can assert that both are necessary for human survival. It is next to impossible for humans to decipher as to what or how it is to feel outside human experience. The dimension is still unexplored and unfathomable for human beings. Thus, Heidegger in B&T refers to the interplay between the actuality of things that is of course hidden on one hand while the oversimplified shimmering appearance of objects on the other. His ideas are simple but the Heideggerian terminologies make this work slightly difficult to read. Still the book has its own charm. Writing a thorough review would mean, submitting a thesis on B&T. As mentioned at the beginning, I’m gonna sit again to read the book and this time, and sure more ideas would surface to add to my existing review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    This I will re-read, and re-read, and re-read, until I get all the chapters. This book actually blew me away and made me think differently about a lot. My philosophy teacher told us to fall in love with the philosopher we're studying , like he had with Heidegger, and so I did too (completely ignoring the fact he was a nazi). I will return to this very soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    This is the best book I have ever read. I had no problem with the translator, Joan Staumbaugh seemed to have done a very good job. I couldn't imagine reading this book in German even if I spoke fluent German because the way Heidegger appropriates words. This edition provides Heidegger's added footnotes and the edition provides a much needed and used by me Lexicon for the Latin and Greek phrases. I had no idea what "Being and Time" was going to be about before I read it. Every synopsis that I had This is the best book I have ever read. I had no problem with the translator, Joan Staumbaugh seemed to have done a very good job. I couldn't imagine reading this book in German even if I spoke fluent German because the way Heidegger appropriates words. This edition provides Heidegger's added footnotes and the edition provides a much needed and used by me Lexicon for the Latin and Greek phrases. I had no idea what "Being and Time" was going to be about before I read it. Every synopsis that I had ever come across through my Great Course lectures, history of philosophy books and youtube videos were completely off the mark. The book was a template on how I've approached my life up until now and I didn't realize that somebody else thought as similarly (but in formal philosophical structures) as I do about the nature of the human experience. (There is an incredibly nuanced presentation of the nature of science that runs through out the book that predates Thomas Kuhn's "The Structures of Scientific Revolutions" but follows it substantially. We are thrown in to the world and must cope by our structure of care (and care is not what you think it means). Have no doubt about it this book reads difficulty. I would recommend skipping the introduction and read it after you've read the book. The book reads a lot like Finnegans Wake, but just realize that as in the Wake each sentence and paragraph has a reason for being placed in the book. I would strongly recommend listening to the Hubert Dreyfus 2007 course on the book given at University of California (Berkeley) freely available from Itunes before you start reading this book. If I had not, I would not have been able to finish the book. I make it a rule that after I have read a book I sell it back to the greatest used bookstore in the known universe, Coas in Las Cruces, NM. This book is the exception. I'll keep a copy for future re readings.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    This book made my life come back into light. It also serves as proof that philosophy is about life, and nothing else. Being and Time renewed a sense of autonomy and history that I hadn't thought possible, my responsibility for the places, people, and meanings I carry with me, and those that I choose to leave behind.

  8. 5 out of 5

    me

    I would rate this as the number one philosophical book written in the 1900's. I wish I had read it in my twenties. Given, it is at times frustrating to read, however it is also addicting at the same time. This is one of the books I will keep with me for life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Williamson

    Being and Time is perhaps the most important philosophical book of the 20th century that is unless you’re an Analytic philosopher, in which case it is just nonsense. I personally, am all for a book that created Continental philosophy and goes further than Wittgenstein in its deconstruction of Metaphyics, Epistemology, the problem of mind and body, of the world, other minds, etc. Basically dissolving all traditional philosophical problems and foundations. As a philosophical text, Heid Being and Time is perhaps the most important philosophical book of the 20th century that is unless you’re an Analytic philosopher, in which case it is just nonsense. I personally, am all for a book that created Continental philosophy and goes further than Wittgenstein in its deconstruction of Metaphyics, Epistemology, the problem of mind and body, of the world, other minds, etc. Basically dissolving all traditional philosophical problems and foundations. As a philosophical text, Heidegger although difficult is not purposively being vague or obtuse, as some of those who have been influenced by him, his work when he does link it to the phenomenon is incredibly revealing and profoundly clear, as he mentions that being is that which is closest and furthest from us. This making his philosophy familiar and alien, simple and complex. Obvious at first but then plunging into layer upon layer of unconcealment, disclosing and unveiling, as this interconnects to a holistic world which is recognisable but hidden. His work is totally rewarding for those who take their time with it. The books opening gambit is the neglect of being in philosophy, he begins this with the question of what he calls the ready-to-hand as opposed to the present-to-hand, this is a question of our being. Are we beings that look at the world without context, say as looking at a table and conceiving that it has weight, colour, mass, substance, or do we use it without a second thought, or in fact with any thought at all? Do we present the world before us or do we act within it? Traditional philosophy, according to Heidegger, has made the metaphysical mistake that our way of being is that of the rational and the logical, to question the world as an object. Heidegger shows that we are part of the world, inseparable from it and the entities that are among us. From here Heidegger unveils Dasein and its world existingly.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Being and Time is probably the most difficult book I've ever read, even with the help of Dreyfus, Polt, and Blattner. (Who are great helps, all of them.) What's really interesting about the book is that Heidegger is simply describing basic everyday "common sense," but in order to get back to the common sense of Aristotle he has to deconstruct 500 years of western thinking. In order to do this he has to invent a new vocabulary that describes being in a extraordinarily rigorous and entirely new wa Being and Time is probably the most difficult book I've ever read, even with the help of Dreyfus, Polt, and Blattner. (Who are great helps, all of them.) What's really interesting about the book is that Heidegger is simply describing basic everyday "common sense," but in order to get back to the common sense of Aristotle he has to deconstruct 500 years of western thinking. In order to do this he has to invent a new vocabulary that describes being in a extraordinarily rigorous and entirely new way. He does this brilliantly, but learning his language and methodology is not easy. But why should it be? He's asking us to jettison the way we've learn to think about being. He's challenging us to start over again from scratch and examine ourselves and our relationship to the world anew. There's no easy way to do this. Writing a "review" of this book, which I understand in only the most tenuous way, is patently ridiculous. But it has changed the way I read philosophy, and I though I'm not ready to sign on to Heidegger's ontology without reservation, I don't regret one minute of the frustration this book has provided me. It's an exquisitely rewarding frustration.

  11. 4 out of 5

    James

    This book will change your life...if you can understand it. Heidegger is a brilliant man who sees the world in a way that is very different, yet very familiar at the same time. This work laid the foundation for a lot of modern philosophy. If you aren't familiar already with the concept of "being-in-the-world", then it's suggested you take a class on Heidegger, or read a beginning or companion guide. You know how sometimes when you're driving a car, you forget that you're driving, and think to yo This book will change your life...if you can understand it. Heidegger is a brilliant man who sees the world in a way that is very different, yet very familiar at the same time. This work laid the foundation for a lot of modern philosophy. If you aren't familiar already with the concept of "being-in-the-world", then it's suggested you take a class on Heidegger, or read a beginning or companion guide. You know how sometimes when you're driving a car, you forget that you're driving, and think to yourself, how did I end up here? If you want to know why that might be, check out Heidegger.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    In lieu of a review a brief history of philosophy. I. The beginnings, e.g., the Pre-socratics. II. Plato footnoted by Aristotle III. Immanuel Kant aufgehoben by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel IV. 20th century showdown: Martin Heidegger v. Ludwig Wittgenstein

  13. 4 out of 5

    Μ C

    One of the most important philosophical books of the 20th century. Heidegger gives an idea of the ontological structures of existence. Some people have a love/hate relationship with this book, I sympathize with them :) My first read was in Greek and I found the translation to be challenging. It has nevertheless helped me to revaluate the book the second time I read it in English, I found it to be rewarding of my time and effort. If you haven't read Heiddeger before, it is not a good idea to star One of the most important philosophical books of the 20th century. Heidegger gives an idea of the ontological structures of existence. Some people have a love/hate relationship with this book, I sympathize with them :) My first read was in Greek and I found the translation to be challenging. It has nevertheless helped me to revaluate the book the second time I read it in English, I found it to be rewarding of my time and effort. If you haven't read Heiddeger before, it is not a good idea to start with this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Giorgi

    before 1927 there was darkness and god said let's be light and published being and time "our aim in the following treatise is to work out the question of the sense of being and to do so concretely what determines beings as beings, that in terms of which beings are already understood." but than god sad let's be cloud and there was only one part of being and time

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Hays

    This is one of the most rigorous and methodically constructed treatises you will find anywhere in philosophy. Heidegger is known for his difficulty, but this book holds an added challenge due to its cumulative dependence. What I mean is, you cannot possibly come to fully grasp the later sections of the book without grasping earlier sections. Every bit of the author's impressive terminology (whether it be a common term imbued with new meaning or a clever neologism) is systematically chosen, intro This is one of the most rigorous and methodically constructed treatises you will find anywhere in philosophy. Heidegger is known for his difficulty, but this book holds an added challenge due to its cumulative dependence. What I mean is, you cannot possibly come to fully grasp the later sections of the book without grasping earlier sections. Every bit of the author's impressive terminology (whether it be a common term imbued with new meaning or a clever neologism) is systematically chosen, introduced, questioned, and developed as the text moves along. If you have never read Heidegger before, expect to reread certain paragraphs at least twice before their meaning begins to dawn on you. If you are persistent, the meaning of his precisely formulated sentences will cause you to perceive the world in entirely new ways. I recommend - at least at first - taking this book in small doses. If you feel your mind wandering at all just stop and go back to it later. If you are looking to scan this book for tidbits of wisdom you will likely be disappointed. Alternately, I would plan on a commitment of at least a few months if you want to glean anything at all from the text. For those who have read Heidegger before: this book is definitely his magnum opus. Within it he establishes a point of departure for all of his later thought and works. It is also the most engaging and enlightening read you will encounter in his repertoire. Compared to Heidegger's post-kehre writings, you will find the material and style in Being and Time to be far more precise and clear [a very difficult feat indeed considering the elusive nature of the subject matter]. Also, reading this book more than once is a must! Do not be surprised if after the first read you feel as though you are missing something - you probably are.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    This book changed my life. It helps that I'm a philosophy major, and took a class on the book (which I honestly recommend NOT reading it unless you have someone who actually understands it helping you). This is the book that make me decide to actually go into Philosophy, specifically 20th Century Continental. It's just... amazing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sabine

    this book absolutely fascinated me. It was helpful though to have a German copy to read in parallel, as the translation into English sometimes "swallows" some of the world plays that make it easier to understand. Time to re-read

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dr. A

    --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). --- It is hard to overstate the importance of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time. It is a work that not only turned the world of philosophy upside down but it also inaugurated several new schools and movements - for example, existentialist phenomenology, popularized as existentialism, philosophical hermeneutics, and deconstruction. Although Heidegger published the manuscript prema/>Read --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). --- It is hard to overstate the importance of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time. It is a work that not only turned the world of philosophy upside down but it also inaugurated several new schools and movements - for example, existentialist phenomenology, popularized as existentialism, philosophical hermeneutics, and deconstruction. Although Heidegger published the manuscript prematurely (in order to be able to assume an academic position), and then abandoned the project before completing the ambitious plan outlined in this first volume, what we do have is a display of thinking unlike anything that came before him. In Being and Time, Heidegger sets out to “destroy” (“deconstruction” comes from a French translation of the German word destruktion) traditional “metaphysics of presence,” and clear the ground anew for ontology. He proposes to study Being from the perspective of “that being for whom being is an issue,” or the untranslatable Dasein, providing an analysis of Being that takes it back to Ancient and Presocratic though. His main problematic is how to discover the structure of Being, which begins with his analysis of Being as thrown-in-the-world and ends with an analysis of Being-towards-death and temporality as the essence of Dasein. This is the end point of much philosophizing, so understanding it requires some work. This most recent edition with a fresh translation by Stambaugh incorporates Heidegger’s margin notes and tracks (more faithfully) his technical usage of German terms. It is quite readable, although new readers will want to approach Being and Time as they would a text written in a language that they are learning - start reading and keep reading even if it seems impenetrable -- meaning begins to emerge through repetition and persistence. We promise! Readers interested in Heidegger’s influence should can Jean-Paul Sartre’s Being and Nothingness, Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method, Emmanuel Levinas’ Totality and Infinity, Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition, Jacques Derrida Disseminations, Luce Irigaray’s The Forgetting of Air, and Alain Badiou’s Being and Event. --- Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production). ---

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

    An incredibly difficult read, but well worth the effort. You have to work to learn Heidegger's language, but once you get the hang of it you can follow this masterpiece of Western Philosophy. This book is the foundation of all of Heidegger's thought and the culmination of 2 milllenia of Philosophic thought from Plato to Nietzsche and Husserl. At root this is really a book about Me and my relationship to the world I live in and my being in it. It helped me see things in a more profound way than I An incredibly difficult read, but well worth the effort. You have to work to learn Heidegger's language, but once you get the hang of it you can follow this masterpiece of Western Philosophy. This book is the foundation of all of Heidegger's thought and the culmination of 2 milllenia of Philosophic thought from Plato to Nietzsche and Husserl. At root this is really a book about Me and my relationship to the world I live in and my being in it. It helped me see things in a more profound way than I had before. There are other essays and books by Heidegger that are more enjoyable reads, but without the foundation and context of Being and Time you're likely to be confused while reading them. I've read both translations of Being & Time and the Macquarrie and Robinson translation is far superior in my opinion. It gives you a much better feel for what Heidegger was endeavoring to convey than the Stambaugh version.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rickeclectic

    One of the most important books in philosophy. Unfortunately, this cannot be read by a novice. It would help to know phenomenology, existentialism, and a fair amount of the history of philosophy. The best summary for this book is actually the Yeats line asking how can you tell the dancer from the dance. Heidegger shows how meaning cannot be separated from its context and puts what may be the last nails in the platonic idealist notion of a humans having a knowledge of some reality of forms. Heide One of the most important books in philosophy. Unfortunately, this cannot be read by a novice. It would help to know phenomenology, existentialism, and a fair amount of the history of philosophy. The best summary for this book is actually the Yeats line asking how can you tell the dancer from the dance. Heidegger shows how meaning cannot be separated from its context and puts what may be the last nails in the platonic idealist notion of a humans having a knowledge of some reality of forms. Heidegger follows Husserl, who is almost unreadable by most people. Heidegger leads to Sartre and the Existentialist crowd, who take various turns at literary, political and other incarnations of how meaning is embedded in context. He is also the philosophical Father of Derrida, who takes the ontological notion of meaning one step further to say not only can we not remove meaning from context, but because of that we can also never really ever guarantee truth. Heidegger is the seeds of all this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Every academic philosopher should read this text, but its usually glossed over or completely ignored by phenomenologists... the simple reason I say this is that Heidegger gives a deconstructive "Definition" of phenomenology that would probably shock most academics who build their careers on "Schooling - Phenomenology..." He says... "Phenomenology is not a school. It is the possibility of thinking, at times changing and only thus persisting, of corresponding to the claim of what is to be thought. Every academic philosopher should read this text, but its usually glossed over or completely ignored by phenomenologists... the simple reason I say this is that Heidegger gives a deconstructive "Definition" of phenomenology that would probably shock most academics who build their careers on "Schooling - Phenomenology..." He says... "Phenomenology is not a school. It is the possibility of thinking, at times changing and only thus persisting, of corresponding to the claim of what is to be thought. If phenomenology is thus experienced and retained, it can disappear as a designation in favor of the matter of thinking whose manifestations remains a mystery." (p.82 My Way of Phenomenology).... Interesting!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicola d'Ugo

    Probably the most acute philosophical essay after Nietzsche and before Deleuze. A travel to the disembodiment of the cultural egos in order to find a basis for the self, and to show the limits and disorder of contemporary sciences. The language is not difficult in itself, and there are many practical examples of daily life, but the repetition of the word 'being' in almost every sentence of the book renders it difficult to digest for most readers.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charles Rutter

    To me there is no one who approaches the most fundamental questions of phenomenology and ontology with such clarity and rigor as Heidegger. As a being for whom our being is a concern, this text is a must read for anyone who wishes to seriously think within the fields of philosophy, as many arguments can be made for the primacy of the ontological question in regards to philosophical thought. I highly recommend this work to persons of all degrees of interest in philosophy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Well ... This is one of the key works of philosophy and a classic. Heidegger tries to figure out the meaning of being in this astounding work of immense scope. This is one book that you can't just read once and then think you have understood - this one will require that you go back to it time and time again to get it all. Very hard to read, very hard to understand, very impressive.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron May

    One of my favorite books. If you don't have a philosophy background, you'll want to read a few commentaries first (dreyfus is good). Also read up a little on the metaphysics of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant and Husserl.

  26. 5 out of 5

    William Yong

    addresses the most fundamental question. supplies a completely new language for understanding what it is to exist. possibly the most important book i have ever read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    AK

    the book that rocked my worldview thank you thank you thank you

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Ok, so this is the book that really got me into philosophy - well, got me to take philosophy really seriously and not just treat it as intellectual leisure, surfing for novelty and 'aha!' moments! Heidegger has had, continues to have, and probably will have an influence on me for years to come - if not my entire life. I started this book when during my first semester studying philosophy was 17 (december 2012), after having it recommended to me by a peer and then watching Rick Roderick's Lecture Ok, so this is the book that really got me into philosophy - well, got me to take philosophy really seriously and not just treat it as intellectual leisure, surfing for novelty and 'aha!' moments! Heidegger has had, continues to have, and probably will have an influence on me for years to come - if not my entire life. I started this book when during my first semester studying philosophy was 17 (december 2012), after having it recommended to me by a peer and then watching Rick Roderick's Lecture "Heidegger - The Rejection of Humanism" (which is on youtube; I highly recommend you check it out if you haven't). I learned Sartre was greatly influenced by this guy (whose existentialism traumatized and fascinated me as a teenager), and so just had to see what the fuss was all about. So I went out and got a copy. Wow. Super Opaque. Even though it seemed damn near impossible at first, after hours slaving over definitions and summaries, I read the chapters on "Attunement" and "Idle Talk" and the whole world changed - literally. I can't adequately express just how powerful reading those sections were at the time. There was such a rush of excitement, and I couldn't put it down (yeah, an usual experience when reading Heidegger). Although his writing style is terrible (and continues to be - I hate reading him, even now) the actual ideas themselves were clear and made perfect sense. For some reason or another, it felt like my life's mission to read this guy and figure him out. There was something so captivating and mysterious about this work, something so alluring and charismatic about the notions surrounding the constitution of Dasein. Anyway, I read it on and off for about two years, working on other Heidegger texts during the period (namely Heidegger's works on Kant). I must have read Division 1 two or Three times during those two years, however I never got around to Division 2. I took a class this semester on Being and Time, and finally read it cover to cover, start to finish. It was a strange experience, because the first half of the course I felt pretty confident and well-versed, but then there was a sudden drop off when we got to Division 2, and I felt like I was starting over. Anyway, I guess I'm mentioning all this because reading this book has been a journey. Reading it wasn't like a novel, or even like reading other philosophers, where you can navigate fairly easily and read the book relatively quickly. This book was an experience, and a life changing one too. Ok, so here are some things I really like about Being and Time - Getting rid of dualism (I know other philosophers before Heidegger, namely Spinoza and Hegel, get rid of dualism, but Heidegger does it in a very radical way that is readily apparent) - The primordial character of Spatiality as constituted by referential totality - Temporality as the gateway to Ontology and the fundamental basis of Dasein - The character of temporality as ex-tasis - The concept of Disclosure, which is mediated by Care - Care as a revision of Intentionality - The distinction between present-to-hand and ready-to-hand - The distinction between vulgur time and temporality - Attunement, Discourse, Understanding, and Care as forming the existential character of Dasein's disclosure Things I dislike - The project of Fundamental Ontology - ok so this dominates Heidegger's entire philosophical project, and encompasses nearly all of his works (and he had A LOT of works aside from BT, mainly in the form of lecture courses. There is some real gold in those courses if you take the time to read some of them. His work on Kant is some of the best I've seen. We can thank people like Theodore Kisiel, Richard Rojcewicz, Walter Brogan, and others for translating these works and bringing them to the public, and Indiana books for publishing many of them!). But I'll be honest, I don't understand what he's going for. Heidegger's view of what Being is becomes more and more narrow throughout the years. If you look at his work in the mid-20s, the problem of Fundamental Ontology doesn't seem so out of reach, but as he pursued this project (and this project was very real to him) more and more, it becomes increasingly narrow, obscure, esoteric, and even mystical. He's like that significant other who you try to understand, but just don't grasp what they "want". - Being as beginning with Dasein - This makes half-sense. The conception of Being arises from within us, yeah; but it's hard to imagine that the tadpoles we evolved from didn't have "being" - Authenticity and Inauthenticity, and the whole thing about the "They" - Maybe I'm not super adept at Heidegger yet, but I really don't see how my relationship with my friends prevents me from having an experience of Pure Being (Ok, so that's a narrow determination, but this is getting too long) - The lack of proof (especially in comparison with someone like Merleau-Ponty, who really drives to prove his points) - His over-confidence that his points are "ontological" - me being distracted and caught up in a chat with my friends over a beer has major ontological implications for Heidegger - namely absorption, fleeing, fallenness, taken-over-by-the-the, etc; these are part of our 'ontology'. Yeah, and he doesn't ground them either? There's a problem. - Being-towards-death The list goes on, but you get the idea. Thanks for reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    What we are shapes what we know; what we know is what we are. Read from the perspective of the late 20th or early 21st centuries, this central assertion of Heidegger's 'Being and Time' seems fresh and modern, almost commonsensical. It can also, depending on one's adherence to a certain conception of scientific objectivity, seem controversial, if not heretical. Like an earlier generation of German thinkers, including Nietzsche and Weber, Heidegger is critical philosophy's reduction to an accessor What we are shapes what we know; what we know is what we are. Read from the perspective of the late 20th or early 21st centuries, this central assertion of Heidegger's 'Being and Time' seems fresh and modern, almost commonsensical. It can also, depending on one's adherence to a certain conception of scientific objectivity, seem controversial, if not heretical. Like an earlier generation of German thinkers, including Nietzsche and Weber, Heidegger is critical philosophy's reduction to an accessory tool of the natural sciences, a simple user's manual for "how we know what we know," as the predominant field of "epistemology" was known in the 19th century. For Heidegger, the circularity of his starting point -- existence is essence, and the many variations on this theme throughout the book -- signals the impossibility of any attempt to radically separate the observer from the observed, or to achieve a neutral, disembodied position from which to contemplate the entities of the world. Science attempts to organize the entities of the world into thematic compartments, but it cannot access an understanding of 'Being' in general, because it refuses to take itself and its own being into account. This more fundamental (and hence 'ontological') project is Heidegger's own; through it, he seeks to restore philosophy to a position of autonomy vis-a-vis the natural sciences. To do so, he takes what he sees as a different tack, a departure from the methods of grand metaphysicians such as Descartes. Heidegger is not interested in reducing the many to the One, in reducing all the diversity of beings to a single, overarching principle of Being (as Descartes sought to reduce the world of entities to the principle of matter, or extension). In 'Being and Time,' rather, there is a wild proliferation of beings, and Heidegger seems to encourage it at every page. It is an almost animist philosophy. Perhaps this is because, as the title of the books suggest, the core of the question at hand does not, as is often superficially remarked, primarily concern beings, or entities themselves, but how Being is related to time. The Being of what we think of as "Man," or the human subject -- neither of which Heidegger condones as valid principles -- is temporal, or constituted in its essence by the fact that it will not last forever. Explaining how this is so is the task that requires nearly 500 pages of meticulous argument from Heidegger. And likewise, as he hints only on the last page of the book, might "time manifest itself as the horizon of Being." Objects and entities, then, may be less a function of the permanence of matter, than an effect of temporality which we have yet to understand. Heidegger leaves off, in 1927, on a note suggestive of the relativity of physical constants similar to that of his contemporary Albert Einstein.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Slachman

    When I first began reading Heidegger, he was eschewed by the academic community as a Fascist. As these things generally go, he eventually reclaimed his status as a brilliant thinker and was once more, thank goodness, embraced by the academy. Though Heidegger's thinking underwent many changes over the course of his career and though existentialists of all sorts of explored the "situatedness" of our experience, I've always been devoted to Being and Time for opening awareness to the complexities of Das When I first began reading Heidegger, he was eschewed by the academic community as a Fascist. As these things generally go, he eventually reclaimed his status as a brilliant thinker and was once more, thank goodness, embraced by the academy. Though Heidegger's thinking underwent many changes over the course of his career and though existentialists of all sorts of explored the "situatedness" of our experience, I've always been devoted to Being and Time for opening awareness to the complexities of Dasein . Cultural studies, sociology, psychology, philosophy, history . . . creative and culturally oriented observations in so many disciplines have been affected by this and other ideas in this book. A rival (in my mind) to Kant in his meticulous analysis--sometimes maddeningly so!--Being and Time stands with few other books in terms of their influence on subsequent Continental Philosophic thinking. His ontological and epistemological investigations have profoundly influenced his successors, Gadamer and Derrida among them, and who hasn't gained from those thinkers' observations (and yes, I realize that's presupposing one can understand what Derrida is saying!)? This is a book I come back to again and again.

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