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Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi

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Acclaimed chef, writer and television personality, Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose (Kill The Poor) return for the follow-up to their #1 New York Times bestseller GET JIRO from Vertigo. In GET JIRO: BLOOD AND SUSHI, Bourdain and Rose examine the origins of the mysterious Jiro and what made him into the chef he has become. Born the heir to a Yakuza crime family, Jiro never Acclaimed chef, writer and television personality, Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose (Kill The Poor) return for the follow-up to their #1 New York Times bestseller GET JIRO from Vertigo. In GET JIRO: BLOOD AND SUSHI, Bourdain and Rose examine the origins of the mysterious Jiro and what made him into the chef he has become.  Born the heir to a Yakuza crime family, Jiro never longed to travel the crimnal path laid out before him, but instead chose to secretly study the rich culinary history of his homeland, something that would have significant repercussions if discoverd by his ganster father. As Jiro's interest in the culinary arts deepens, his ability to keep his artistic and criminal worlds seperate becomes too great, triggering a great personal loss that will forever change Jiro's path.


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Acclaimed chef, writer and television personality, Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose (Kill The Poor) return for the follow-up to their #1 New York Times bestseller GET JIRO from Vertigo. In GET JIRO: BLOOD AND SUSHI, Bourdain and Rose examine the origins of the mysterious Jiro and what made him into the chef he has become. Born the heir to a Yakuza crime family, Jiro never Acclaimed chef, writer and television personality, Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose (Kill The Poor) return for the follow-up to their #1 New York Times bestseller GET JIRO from Vertigo. In GET JIRO: BLOOD AND SUSHI, Bourdain and Rose examine the origins of the mysterious Jiro and what made him into the chef he has become.  Born the heir to a Yakuza crime family, Jiro never longed to travel the crimnal path laid out before him, but instead chose to secretly study the rich culinary history of his homeland, something that would have significant repercussions if discoverd by his ganster father. As Jiro's interest in the culinary arts deepens, his ability to keep his artistic and criminal worlds seperate becomes too great, triggering a great personal loss that will forever change Jiro's path.

30 review for Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I goofed again and I read #2 before the 1st volume, but this time it might have worked out in my favor as this is a prequel so all this happened before book 1 I am assuming. Well, this was interesting. It certainly had some blood and gore. This is set in the Tokyo Mob. Jiro is the younger son and the more responsible one. The older brother is a loose cannon. Their father is the head of a business and mafia type organization. Jiro really wants to be a Sushi Chef. He spends his nights working under I goofed again and I read #2 before the 1st volume, but this time it might have worked out in my favor as this is a prequel so all this happened before book 1 I am assuming. Well, this was interesting. It certainly had some blood and gore. This is set in the Tokyo Mob. Jiro is the younger son and the more responsible one. The older brother is a loose cannon. Their father is the head of a business and mafia type organization. Jiro really wants to be a Sushi Chef. He spends his nights working under a gift artist learning the trade. This brings shame to his father. The end is a mafia drama. It gets bloody. I think I enjoyed this story. The Famous chef Anthony Bourdain wrote this. How fascinating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Oh noooooooooooooooooooooo! The first Get Jiro was so good – how has the sequel turned out so poorly?! It’s one of those paradoxical sequel/prequel dealios: it follows the first book but it’s a precursor to the first book’s story. Blood and Sushi is Jiro’s origins – and it’s disappointingly weak and kinda pointless too. The first book hinted at Jiro’s past: the Yakuza back tattoo, his proficiency with blade weaponry. You could give a fair guess as to his background. Well, this book confirms it: Oh noooooooooooooooooooooo! The first Get Jiro was so good – how has the sequel turned out so poorly?! It’s one of those paradoxical sequel/prequel dealios: it follows the first book but it’s a precursor to the first book’s story. Blood and Sushi is Jiro’s origins – and it’s disappointingly weak and kinda pointless too. The first book hinted at Jiro’s past: the Yakuza back tattoo, his proficiency with blade weaponry. You could give a fair guess as to his background. Well, this book confirms it: Jiro is heir to a major Yakuza crime family (that’s not a spoiler, it’s in the cover blurb) but he doesn’t have a taste for it and wants instead to become a sushi chef. Lots of killing and bullshit drama ensues and, as we already know because this is a prequel, Jiro leaves Japan and heads to America to open his sushi restaurant. It’s an unremarkable and predictable story littered with one-dimensional characters: the black-hearted half-brother who believes he is destined to be leader, the cold and distant father, the sweet and understanding girlfriend. The fun and silliness of the first book is entirely absent as writers Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose move away from satirising the cooking world, going for a dull and half-baked crime story instead. Langdon Foss’s charming art is missing as artist Ale Garza steps in as his replacement. Garza’s art isn’t bad work but it’s fairly generic and bland. The look of Blood and Sushi could be an anywhere/anytime modern Japanese city rather than attempting a similar look to the wacky and imaginative dystopia of LA from the first book. There’s also very little on the food front and there aren’t many wonderful dishes for foodies to gawp at which was an appealing part of the first book for me – boooo! It boils down to being an origin story that didn’t need to be told. I would’ve rather have seen what Jiro did next following his victory over the warring chef clans of LA with preferably Langdon Foss returning as the main artist. I was so looking forward to this one too. Oh well. Sometimes you try a restaurant and pleasantly discover great cooking; then when you go back again you get slop and realise, oh, that good meal was a one-off. So it goes with Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Once I was finally able to stomach watching my unwatched episodes of Parts Unknown, I decided to try Tony's genre fiction, starting with his graphic novels. Get Jiro! and Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi are the only two graphic novels in this series, and between the two the world building seems to have changed or flipped or ceased to matter. I really noticed it because I accidentally read the other volume first. So apparently this one is an "origin story" of sorts, where Jiro is the son of a mob boss Once I was finally able to stomach watching my unwatched episodes of Parts Unknown, I decided to try Tony's genre fiction, starting with his graphic novels. Get Jiro! and Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi are the only two graphic novels in this series, and between the two the world building seems to have changed or flipped or ceased to matter. I really noticed it because I accidentally read the other volume first. So apparently this one is an "origin story" of sorts, where Jiro is the son of a mob boss but really wants to be a sushi chef instead. This one feels like it takes place in NYC or Tokyo, somewhere big, but the regular Get Jiro! is in a dystopian Los Angeles and feels like a completely different universe than this. Ah well. His half (?) brother who never takes his sunglasses off wants to take over his father's dynasty but his father wants to leave it to Hiro, so he now has a new enemy, etc. I think this one really illuminates the differences between a foodie story and a mob story. The best writing happens around the descriptions of rice and fish but I'm not sure they really need to be here. Still I'm not going to rag on Tony very much. I imagine this was a fun side project and I would have rather he were still writing imperfect comics about sushi and mobsters if it meant he could still be with us. *shrug*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    More than fish heads go flying when Quentin Tanrantino meets Iron Chef. A furious and compelling read, but ultimately the plot seems too familiar to be truly satisfying.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    How did the son of one of Japan's most powerful gangster become the deadly sushi chef who took down the LA food mafia in "Get Jiro!" (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...)? I loved the idea of a kid who only dreams of making the world's best sushi, but who's father expects him to take up the life of crime that has been the family business for all these years. However, the very bloody Yakuza drama strikes a much darker tone than the first volume; a lot of the tongue-in-cheek humor has been How did the son of one of Japan's most powerful gangster become the deadly sushi chef who took down the LA food mafia in "Get Jiro!" (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...)? I loved the idea of a kid who only dreams of making the world's best sushi, but who's father expects him to take up the life of crime that has been the family business for all these years. However, the very bloody Yakuza drama strikes a much darker tone than the first volume; a lot of the tongue-in-cheek humor has been replaced by a few old-school mafia tropes: psychopathic brother, sweet and mostly passive girlfriend, her hopelessly dumb and big-mouthed roommate... I suppose "Get Jiro!" had set the bar pretty high: I preferred the artwork and the kooky story. This prequel is a bit predictable, and could have been fleshed out a bit more. I think the real difference between volume one and this prequel is that "Get Jiro!" was really about food and food culture: you could see Bourdain's love for the good stuff shine through, his irreverent humor was all over the story, as where food is hardly mentioned at all in "Blood and sushi". We see Jiro at work, and his half-Italian girlfriend makes him sample some Italian food, but that's pretty much it. I didn't feel Bourdain's touch in this one - not as much as in volume one. Still fun, just not quite as fun as the first book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angus McKeogh

    Just a quick diversion with a graphic novel. Quirky and fun. Bourdain’s fiction is really very good, and I love that he’s a part of this comic book series. Certainly it’s open for a third.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aloke

    What Sam Quixote said!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    It's nice to revisit the world of Get Jiro. Blood and Sushi is a prequel to the original tale. Set in Japan, the story shows us a younger Jiro, heir to a Yakuza family, but who secretly wants to be a sushi chef. He tries to keep the worlds of crime and culinary training seperate, but, inevitably, they conflict, and Jiro must choose whether to inherit the life his father wishes for him or to follow his dreams. While I enjoyed this story, it felt like a lesser effort compared to the original. It's It's nice to revisit the world of Get Jiro. Blood and Sushi is a prequel to the original tale. Set in Japan, the story shows us a younger Jiro, heir to a Yakuza family, but who secretly wants to be a sushi chef. He tries to keep the worlds of crime and culinary training seperate, but, inevitably, they conflict, and Jiro must choose whether to inherit the life his father wishes for him or to follow his dreams. While I enjoyed this story, it felt like a lesser effort compared to the original. It's not quite as gonzo over the top. There is no satire involving current culinary trends--just a food joke or two, and that's it. It's a pretty straight forward, reasonably predictable story. Alé Garza's art is probably the best thing about this project. It's stylish, quirky, action-packed. Lovely stuff! The story is decent enough. It just didn't wow me as much as the original Get Jiro.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    (Received from Netgalley for review.) This is Jiro's origin story, and it reads more like a straight action movie than the previous book. I think I liked the first one a bit more, though. It had more focus on the food, which is what really interested me. This one has a lot more truly senseless violence, and Jiro's brother is so over the top as a character that he was more annoying than fun after awhile. And even with the back story, Jiro still isn't terribly interesting as a character. But as an (Received from Netgalley for review.) This is Jiro's origin story, and it reads more like a straight action movie than the previous book. I think I liked the first one a bit more, though. It had more focus on the food, which is what really interested me. This one has a lot more truly senseless violence, and Jiro's brother is so over the top as a character that he was more annoying than fun after awhile. And even with the back story, Jiro still isn't terribly interesting as a character. But as an action film, it's pretty solid, just not the sort of thing that I would usually love.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    This trade paperback is the prequel to the original Get Jiro! The book is reasonably entertaining, but does not measure up to Bourdain’s other endeavors. I have enjoyed the TV shows and the first memoir, so maybe my expectations were too high. I just was not impressed. Although I did like this a little, mostly the artwork, it was nothing special. A fairly familiar gangster narrative that leans too heavy on the sensibilities of Kill Bill.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Giuliano

    While I think volume 1 has more ass-kicking and culinary exploration (which I like even more than ass-kicking), this volume definitely has more pathos, and shows a lot more of who Jiro is/was as a person before the events of the first book. If you liked the first, then you'll like this one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    The prologue story to Get Jiro! of his life in Japan.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Brickthrower

    Pretty good and entertaining read but I still prefer the 1st one; also really enjoyed Ale Garza's art and Dave Johnson's cover.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amar Pai

    I didn't like the art style in this one. Way different from Get Jiro #1. This time around all the gratuitous sex and violence just seemed stupid. I just wanted to see food preparation

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    A prequel that only Anthony Bourdain can write and Ale Garza can draw. A beautiful heartbreaking tale which could have been 5 stars if I love food that much. Cool.

  16. 5 out of 5

    cynthia ✨

    Is this based off a real-life event?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rana

    Delightfully bloody and full of little moments of snark.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline O.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi is the prequel to the Get Jiro series by Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose. It does read like a prequel because it's all set-up. That isn't to say it's bad - I'm intrigued, and I expect the story will be even more enjoyable once I get a chance to purchase and read volume 1. The story is somewhat simple, though it is well-told. Jiro has one desire in life - and it's not to go into the family business. Jiro wants nothing more than to become a sushi chef. To that end, he's Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi is the prequel to the Get Jiro series by Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose. It does read like a prequel because it's all set-up. That isn't to say it's bad - I'm intrigued, and I expect the story will be even more enjoyable once I get a chance to purchase and read volume 1. The story is somewhat simple, though it is well-told. Jiro has one desire in life - and it's not to go into the family business. Jiro wants nothing more than to become a sushi chef. To that end, he's been mentoring with a top sushi chef for three years. Jiro's girlfriend, who is half Japanese and half Italian and who owns an Italian restaurant, supports him in this. His father, on the other hand, is only concerned about the family business. And, unfortunately, the family business is the mob, namely Yakuza. Jiro's brother, Ichigo, is really into the family business. Their father's enforcer for years, he enjoys violence and killing. You'd think this would work out - Jiro could become a chef and Ichigo take over the business? Right? Yep, we all know mob stories never end happily. Jiro's father discovers his secret sushi lessons, and brings him in for a meeting. He tells Jiro that not only as the eldest, but as a better and more stable businessman, he must take over the business when he, the father, is gone. But before Jiro can really process this - Ichigo gets wind of his father's decision. Ichigo kills their father, frames his brother, and takes over the Yakuza business. Jiro boards a plane for Los Angeles. Get Jiro is all about the art and less about the dialogue or even characterization. There are pages of frames with no dialogue at all. And the art is stark and dark. This book has a film noir look and feel, despite being set in Japan. And Bourdain's dark underbelly of Japan is a fascinating place, though the story is familiar. Seriously, how many "boy doesn't want to go into the family business and strikes out on his own" stories of some sort have you read? But the story also has a strong sense of set-up, which also gives it a sense of "it will improve, this is only the first chapter". I fully intend to pick up the "next" volume (which was published first, this one was published second, and my local comics guy recommended reading starting with the prequel). Overall, it was a good read, and I'm eager to pick-up volume 1. Recommended for mature readers (violence, implied sexuality).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    This is the prequel to Get Jiro! , Anthony Bourdain's debut comic. Here we get a small glimpse of Jiro's origins, how he lived in Japan and how he came to live in America. Interestingly, Get Jiro! depicted L.A. as a sort of foodie dystopia, a wasteland essentially ruled by Food Network chefs turned mob bosses, where all forms of traditional entertainment disappeared, but this comic has a very different tone. There's no attempt at a creative setting in this. What we see of Japanese society seems This is the prequel to Get Jiro! , Anthony Bourdain's debut comic. Here we get a small glimpse of Jiro's origins, how he lived in Japan and how he came to live in America. Interestingly, Get Jiro! depicted L.A. as a sort of foodie dystopia, a wasteland essentially ruled by Food Network chefs turned mob bosses, where all forms of traditional entertainment disappeared, but this comic has a very different tone. There's no attempt at a creative setting in this. What we see of Japanese society seems to be fairly normal, with some Yakuza violence thrown in. The plot is less silly and outlandish than the first book, but it's also a lot more predictable. If you asked me what Jiro did in Japan after I'd read the first comic, my guess probably would have come quite close. Food is a theme throughout this comic, occasionally coming to the forefront. Jiro is secretly apprenticing under a master sushi chef when he's not on Yakuza business. We get to see him struggling with still only being allowed to work on rice after two years, and there's a scene with him discussing the similarities between Italian and Japanese food with his girlfriend over a meal, but mainly it's just in the background - chapter headings being named after Japanese dishes or people eating yakitori, that sort of thing. I guess I was hoping for something closer to the Oishinbo manga series, essentially a story about someone learning how to cook, but that would be a major departure from the first book. This comic does well with the unique balance of gruesome violence and food culture that Bourdain and Rose have created. Even though this felt a bit by the numbers, it was still a fun read. I preferred the illustrations in this one as well. From what I've seen, most people enjoyed the first comic more, and even though I liked that he took more chances with that story, I think I enjoyed this one more in the end. Book Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jillyn

    What a bummer. I really enjoyed the first book in this graphic novel series. What's not to love? It involves Anthony Bourdain, violence, and food. Sign me up! I was happy to see that there was a new book.... But I was left disappointed. This second novel is a backstory. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Honestly? I found it boring. I don't know how that's possible. It's chock full of violence and sex and crime and the Yakuza and still, I was left with a "meh" feeling. Maybe it's because it's What a bummer. I really enjoyed the first book in this graphic novel series. What's not to love? It involves Anthony Bourdain, violence, and food. Sign me up! I was happy to see that there was a new book.... But I was left disappointed. This second novel is a backstory. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Honestly? I found it boring. I don't know how that's possible. It's chock full of violence and sex and crime and the Yakuza and still, I was left with a "meh" feeling. Maybe it's because it's a predictable plot? I'm not sure. There's also way less focus on the food, which was disappointing for me. That was a good part of the reason why I enjoyed the first one. I also didn't care for the art in this volume. It's completely different, and for me the change wasn't for the better. It's kind of dark and not really anything memorable. I think this added to the overall "ho hum" of the story for me. I don't think I'll read any other books in the Get Jiro line if they continue. I think people who enjoy formulaic action movies (like the Fast and the Furious franchise) might like it. But if you loved the first one, maybe reconsider reading this one. I received a copy in exchange for my honest review. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  21. 4 out of 5

    BookishBat

    I originally picked this one up because I'm a fan of Anthony Bourdain, a chef well-known for his bad boy personality and his great food travels around the world (check out his TV shows and books). I also noticed that Vertigo published it, which meant it had to be good. I have to admit that I haven't read the first volume of this series yet, but Blood and Sushi serves as a prequel anyway so that's okay. The artwork was good. I liked the bold lines. I admired the protagonist Jiro, who was a I originally picked this one up because I'm a fan of Anthony Bourdain, a chef well-known for his bad boy personality and his great food travels around the world (check out his TV shows and books). I also noticed that Vertigo published it, which meant it had to be good. I have to admit that I haven't read the first volume of this series yet, but Blood and Sushi serves as a prequel anyway so that's okay. The artwork was good. I liked the bold lines. I admired the protagonist Jiro, who was a gangster with honor that just wanted to become a sushi chef. I have to say though that I was way more interested in his sushi training and the cool women (one who knows her way around Italian cuisine, the other an obvious anime/manga fan) he hung around after hours. The gang stuff isn't really my thing and the dialogue was a little too vulgar even for me. I liked the ending involving the sushi chef master though and I see fun things happening with Jiro's story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Skyler

    What little was intriguing about the first Get Jiro! was all abandoned for the sequel. An origins story with little, if no, interesting elements. Story full of cliches that make me wonder if it's an homage from Bourdain to old Japanese Yakuza movies, or merely an unimaginative story. The art is well done, but nothing too over the top and striking. Again, nothing memorable. The only parts I really enjoyed were the food related parts--the describing of dishes, foods, the etymology behind them, but What little was intriguing about the first Get Jiro! was all abandoned for the sequel. An origins story with little, if no, interesting elements. Story full of cliches that make me wonder if it's an homage from Bourdain to old Japanese Yakuza movies, or merely an unimaginative story. The art is well done, but nothing too over the top and striking. Again, nothing memorable. The only parts I really enjoyed were the food related parts--the describing of dishes, foods, the etymology behind them, but those were few and far between in this sequel. Also, I feel like it would've been a better storytelling method to incorporate Jiro's origins story into the original, spliced in through cutaways or flashbacks, instead of sacrificing the interesting for the boringly cliche.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Becki Iverson

    I enjoyed this graphic novel, just as I enjoyed the first one in the series, but I really struggled with the violence. I know that the violence is part and parcel of Get Jiro in the first place, but this book focused far more on the Yakuza/Jiro's pre-story, and it was much, much darker. I was able to handle the first book better since it lived in this fantasy world of a battle between kind of cuisines; this one lives in the far more real, far more terrifying world of the Yakuza. The art is I enjoyed this graphic novel, just as I enjoyed the first one in the series, but I really struggled with the violence. I know that the violence is part and parcel of Get Jiro in the first place, but this book focused far more on the Yakuza/Jiro's pre-story, and it was much, much darker. I was able to handle the first book better since it lived in this fantasy world of a battle between kind of cuisines; this one lives in the far more real, far more terrifying world of the Yakuza. The art is gorgeous as always and the story does explain Jiro's pre-story, so those things are important. I still enjoyed it, was just a little gory. Most fans won't care, but if you are someone who struggles with this as well, take note.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stanley

    This was the interesting, but bizarre tale of Jiro being part of a gang family where he dispurses mob justice with his lunatic brother in the evening and then late night he trains as a sushi chef from an old man with a lifetime of experience. Having eaten sushi for the first time after the Jiro documentary, I figured I would see what this was about. What I got was not what I expected in sometimes good and sometimes bad ways. The relationship with his girlfriend was good, but overall, I had a hard This was the interesting, but bizarre tale of Jiro being part of a gang family where he dispurses mob justice with his lunatic brother in the evening and then late night he trains as a sushi chef from an old man with a lifetime of experience. Having eaten sushi for the first time after the Jiro documentary, I figured I would see what this was about. What I got was not what I expected in sometimes good and sometimes bad ways. The relationship with his girlfriend was good, but overall, I had a hard time connecting with the characters. The art was pretty good, though, and the story was often fun. So, if you think you might like it, absolutely give it a read. I with I would have tempered my expectations for it, though.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I was happy to get early access to an ebook of Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi through NetGalley. I've always been a fan of Anthony Bourdain's writing. I'm not a huge manga fan though, so my review reflects that. I read it in about an hour while my baby slept in the stroller, so it's a very quick read. I found some of the humor to be a bit immature and geared towards high school boys, but then other parts were very sophisticated and would totally go over the head of most teenagers. The graphics were I was happy to get early access to an ebook of Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi through NetGalley. I've always been a fan of Anthony Bourdain's writing. I'm not a huge manga fan though, so my review reflects that. I read it in about an hour while my baby slept in the stroller, so it's a very quick read. I found some of the humor to be a bit immature and geared towards high school boys, but then other parts were very sophisticated and would totally go over the head of most teenagers. The graphics were just average. I wasn't blown away by the images. I would of liked to see more emphasis on the food and the sushi chef, rather than on the mobsters and the criminals. Overall, it was a fun and fast paced read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Maluck

    What use is a prequel if it reflects nearly nothing onto its partner story? "Jiro used to be involved with a gang and cared about food preparation even before he was a chef," okay. What use is artwork that continuously obscures faces, figures, and backgrounds in service to padding out a featherweight script? I had this marked as 2-star for a while, but when asked what this book had going for it, I had nothing to say. The colors aren't bad? That's not even a compliment, just an acknowledgement What use is a prequel if it reflects nearly nothing onto its partner story? "Jiro used to be involved with a gang and cared about food preparation even before he was a chef," okay. What use is artwork that continuously obscures faces, figures, and backgrounds in service to padding out a featherweight script? I had this marked as 2-star for a while, but when asked what this book had going for it, I had nothing to say. The colors aren't bad? That's not even a compliment, just an acknowledgement that, yes, the book is in color. Appreciate the unique dish that was "Get Jiro" and forget this California Roll cash-in.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I have not read the first Get Jiro! comic, though since this is a prequel I figured that it would stand pretty much on its own. It does, but I think that I would have appreciated the story more if I had known what it was building towards. While the plot is a little thin, the atmosphere is fantastic. The illustrations are deeply saturated, the use of color building mood and flavor so effectively that you can almost taste the food on the page (which is lovingly rendered in both description and I have not read the first Get Jiro! comic, though since this is a prequel I figured that it would stand pretty much on its own. It does, but I think that I would have appreciated the story more if I had known what it was building towards. While the plot is a little thin, the atmosphere is fantastic. The illustrations are deeply saturated, the use of color building mood and flavor so effectively that you can almost taste the food on the page (which is lovingly rendered in both description and illustration; I would expect no less in an offering from Anthony Bourdain). *According to FTC regulations I disclose that I received this book through Goodreads First-Reads*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Decent artwork, but formulaic and extremely predictable story. The first book was interesting in that it set a scene that had never been done before. Post-apocalyptic, yes, that has been done, endlessly. But a world ruled by gangs of foodies and vegans? Now that's original. This book, however, has no original world-it's basically set in a caricature of Japanese culture. The Jiro back story unfolds exactly as you would predict it to. And the rest of the content consists of pubescent boy fantasy. Decent artwork, but formulaic and extremely predictable story. The first book was interesting in that it set a scene that had never been done before. Post-apocalyptic, yes, that has been done, endlessly. But a world ruled by gangs of foodies and vegans? Now that's original. This book, however, has no original world-it's basically set in a caricature of Japanese culture. The Jiro back story unfolds exactly as you would predict it to. And the rest of the content consists of pubescent boy fantasy. I'm only bumping this up to 3 stars because I did enjoy the artwork.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Glennis

    If you have read Get Jiro and wondered how Jiro got to where he was in LA, then this is the story for you. This graphic novel is slim on dialogue but the images perfectly convey the feelings that Jiro has about not fitting into the yakuza lifestyle and hiding his lessons in becoming a sushi chef. The Japan in this book isn’t nearly as crazy feeling as the LA was in the previous book. I liked the look and story of this collection and hopefully at some point in the future there might be more Jiro If you have read Get Jiro and wondered how Jiro got to where he was in LA, then this is the story for you. This graphic novel is slim on dialogue but the images perfectly convey the feelings that Jiro has about not fitting into the yakuza lifestyle and hiding his lessons in becoming a sushi chef. The Japan in this book isn’t nearly as crazy feeling as the LA was in the previous book. I liked the look and story of this collection and hopefully at some point in the future there might be more Jiro stories. Digital review copy provided by the publisher through Edelweiss

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I like the first half of this book a lot! I like the middle part of this book a lot. The End of This Book wrapped up way too quick. As much detailed storytelling is in the first act and the second act, the third act felt abbreviated. I very much would have liked to have seen more of the conflict between Ichigo and Jiro. I very much would have liked to have seen the sushi master or hints of the sushi master prior to his appearance in the Final Act

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