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The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization: How to Taste and See the Abundance of Life

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In a world gone crazy one might wonder if simple acts of civility are worth the trouble. Dressing with dignity, writing letters, and innocent courtship are just some of the lost arts of kindness and integrity that Dr. Michael Kalpakgian tries to dig up and dust off, imploring us to regain the honor and worth our society once had. These noble habits of living fill common In a world gone crazy one might wonder if simple acts of civility are worth the trouble. Dressing with dignity, writing letters, and innocent courtship are just some of the lost arts of kindness and integrity that Dr. Michael Kalpakgian tries to dig up and dust off, imploring us to regain the honor and worth our society once had. These noble habits of living fill common life with an abundance of simple pleasures that adorn day to day existence.   The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization will inspire you to seek out and nourish the simple joys that lift the spirit, rejoice the heart, and enliven the mind.        


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In a world gone crazy one might wonder if simple acts of civility are worth the trouble. Dressing with dignity, writing letters, and innocent courtship are just some of the lost arts of kindness and integrity that Dr. Michael Kalpakgian tries to dig up and dust off, imploring us to regain the honor and worth our society once had. These noble habits of living fill common In a world gone crazy one might wonder if simple acts of civility are worth the trouble. Dressing with dignity, writing letters, and innocent courtship are just some of the lost arts of kindness and integrity that Dr. Michael Kalpakgian tries to dig up and dust off, imploring us to regain the honor and worth our society once had. These noble habits of living fill common life with an abundance of simple pleasures that adorn day to day existence.   The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization will inspire you to seek out and nourish the simple joys that lift the spirit, rejoice the heart, and enliven the mind.        

38 review for The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization: How to Taste and See the Abundance of Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    If you're looking for a guide on how to revive the lost art of writing letters, hospitality, and other "old fashioned" ideas, this book isn't for you. It's more of a collection of essays arguing why the we should revive these old practices. The content in each section was solid but the fact that each section repeated the same ideas at least twice using the same examples greatly bothered me (perhaps more than it should have). Halfway -- and sometimes three times -- per essay I would say, "Wait, If you're looking for a guide on how to revive the lost art of writing letters, hospitality, and other "old fashioned" ideas, this book isn't for you. It's more of a collection of essays arguing why the we should revive these old practices. The content in each section was solid but the fact that each section repeated the same ideas at least twice using the same examples greatly bothered me (perhaps more than it should have). Halfway -- and sometimes three times -- per essay I would say, "Wait, didn't I just read this?" Like I said, solid content but poorly edited and a bit misleading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Ard

    DNF 71%. I was drawn to this title because of the Dr. Kalpakgian's interview with Brett McKay on The Art of Manliness Podcast. The conversation they shared was illuminating and interesting, and I walked away both interested in reading the book that inspired such a meeting of minds. However, in comparison with the interview, The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization is a disappointment. The main reason for my low rating, as well as the reason I did not finish the book, is the lack of clear DNF 71%. I was drawn to this title because of the Dr. Kalpakgian's interview with Brett McKay on The Art of Manliness Podcast. The conversation they shared was illuminating and interesting, and I walked away both interested in reading the book that inspired such a meeting of minds. However, in comparison with the interview, The Lost Arts of Modern Civilization is a disappointment. The main reason for my low rating, as well as the reason I did not finish the book, is the lack of clear organization. The author jumps from one topic to another within chapters with no real transition, and the book starts out cold with no introduction to speak of. We are given no real reason for why Dr. Kalpakgian claims these arts of modern civilization are lost, or indeed why we should trust his judgment. Another huge turn-off is the broad sweeping statements he makes about the modern generation, which come across like curmudgeonly fist-shaking. He cites no sources when he makes claims about contemporary behavior, and he offers no suggestions as to how we can adopt these lost arts into a modern lifestyle. I am left to believe that he expects everyone to chuck their computers, phones, and televisions into the dumpster and resume life as if it's 1920, rather than come up with a solution to integrate letter-writing, hospitality, courtship, etc.--arts that I actually agree should make a comeback--into our modern life. I also found his analyses of some of the literary works--particularly King Lear--to be just dead wrong. He paints King Lear as the victim of Regan and Goneril, completely absolving the king of his own role in the tragedy. Had he not held a court so fixated on flattery, perhaps his two eldest daughters would not have turned into backstabbing sycophants. Does this excuse their behavior? Absolutely not. However, based on the brief reading provided by Dr. Kalpakgian, we are expected to believe King Lear is an innocent, doddering old man who was done nothing to deserve the ill treatment he receives. That is just incorrect. Perhaps if he had expanded each chapter and talked more about the works and people he quoted this book would have made more sense. Instead, he assumes that everyone who picks this book up will be familiar with every single person and work referenced and finds no need to recap or summarize anything. If anyone has been thinking about reading this book, I really recommend you look up and listen to the episode of the Art of Manliness Podcast instead. The information given there is more helpful and applicable than what you'll find here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt Astin

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate Fox

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  8. 5 out of 5

    Johann Caauwe

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Dunn

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bob Zelle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Leo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  15. 4 out of 5

    SBF

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cody Sexton

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christian Fischer

  21. 4 out of 5

    A

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emil Loya

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mikko Tervahauta

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fr David

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dag Ryland

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Trent

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shereen

  31. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Jarrel

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  33. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Larson

  34. 4 out of 5

    Rev. David

  35. 4 out of 5

    Feargal

  36. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kolodzy

  37. 4 out of 5

    Tom Owen

  38. 4 out of 5

    Drew

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