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Passage

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Fawn and necromancer-patroller husband Dag seek solutions to the perilous split between their peoples, joined by her brother Whit, two novice patrollers, a flatboat captain searching for her vanished father and fiancé, a shrewd backwoods hunter, and a farmer boy unintentionally beguiled by Dag's growing magery.


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Fawn and necromancer-patroller husband Dag seek solutions to the perilous split between their peoples, joined by her brother Whit, two novice patrollers, a flatboat captain searching for her vanished father and fiancé, a shrewd backwoods hunter, and a farmer boy unintentionally beguiled by Dag's growing magery.

30 review for Passage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    This is the third book in Bujold's SHARING KNIFE western frontier-flavored fantasy series. We're finally getting away from relationship drama here, as the plot takes our main characters, Dag and his wife Fawn, along with Fawn's sometimes callow brother Whit, down the Mississippi Grace River to the sea, experiencing life on a flatboat with a few adventures along the way. There are some interesting hints that this is an alternate version, or perhaps a post-apocalyptic version, of our world. Dag is This is the third book in Bujold's SHARING KNIFE western frontier-flavored fantasy series. We're finally getting away from relationship drama here, as the plot takes our main characters, Dag and his wife Fawn, along with Fawn's sometimes callow brother Whit, down the Mississippi Grace River to the sea, experiencing life on a flatboat with a few adventures along the way. There are some interesting hints that this is an alternate version, or perhaps a post-apocalyptic version, of our world. Dag is still trying to figure out his magical powers and how to bridge the gap of suspicion and misunderstanding between his people, the Lakewalkers, and Fawn's, the non-magical farmers. It's a rather leisurely trip down the river, with a few sandbars and shoals but not much in the way of rapids, both physically and metaphorically speaking. The pace doesn't really pick up until the last quarter of the book, about a hundred pages from the end(view spoiler)[, when our characters need to try to take out some river bandits, and Dag finds a rather alarming new way to use his powers (hide spoiler)] . But Bujold writes well, and the river journey storyline and characters kept my interest. I'm not big on May-December romances, and this is a major one, but I can forgive a lot where the issue isn't glossed over and the book actually deals with the difficulties that their relationship creates ... although here the biggest stumbling block isn't the age difference between Dag and Fawn (which is substantial -- she's about 19 and he's in his 40s, I believe) but the problems inherent in a mixed marriage between a farmer and a Lakewalker. Also, I think the overall story has been improved by not having their romance be the focus of the novel: their relationship is a very minor subplot here. The main focus is on their relationships with the people around them, the mistrust between the Lakewalker people and the farmers, and Dag's developing magical skills. I'll read the last book in the series, though unless the overall pace picks up I'm liable to do a little skimming. ETA: The last book was actually excellent, so if you've made it this far with the series, it's definitely worth finishing up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    It is not easy fighting magical evil monsters but it is harder when the monster is a sheep in wolves clothing, your fellow person; creeps in like a friend and pounces when you least expect it. Dag and Fawn’s story continues in the 3rd book in this series. Against all odds, they sought out harmony between centuries long divided people, only to find out that the monster in plain sight is just as hard to overcome as one that lurks in the dark. As expected, love beats hate, good defeats evil, and th It is not easy fighting magical evil monsters but it is harder when the monster is a sheep in wolves clothing, your fellow person; creeps in like a friend and pounces when you least expect it. Dag and Fawn’s story continues in the 3rd book in this series. Against all odds, they sought out harmony between centuries long divided people, only to find out that the monster in plain sight is just as hard to overcome as one that lurks in the dark. As expected, love beats hate, good defeats evil, and they lived to fight another day. Best of all, they have their own little gang of renegades fighting their cause. I’m still enjoying this series👌...going on to the last book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lightreads

    Book three in this romance-fantasy quartet with the cross-cultural marriage. Okay, maybe . . . maybe there's a reason you don't see much midwestern-influenced fantasy out there? Wait, no, I'm being cheap. See, here's the thing: Dag said more slowly, "He was just an ordinary patroller, before his knife got broken. But if ordinary folks can't fix the world, it's not going to get fixed. There are no lords here. The gods are absent." Putting aside that this is an incredibly disingenuous thing for Dag t Book three in this romance-fantasy quartet with the cross-cultural marriage. Okay, maybe . . . maybe there's a reason you don't see much midwestern-influenced fantasy out there? Wait, no, I'm being cheap. See, here's the thing: Dag said more slowly, "He was just an ordinary patroller, before his knife got broken. But if ordinary folks can't fix the world, it's not going to get fixed. There are no lords here. The gods are absent." Putting aside that this is an incredibly disingenuous thing for Dag to say, considering he's spent the series developing his unexpected magic powers. She's written books about lords and books about gods, and in theory I'm all on board for a universe that changes up those power discourses. It just turns out, I don't particularly want it to be this universe, where the solution to the world's troubles appears to be a thought just a few notches above 'can't we all just get along.' And also a universe where Dag calls Fawn "child" when they're in bed, argh argh argh! Where was I? Oh, right. There's homespun wisdom, sure, but mostly these are truths so simplified, they've lost all their density for me. I suspect someone raised in this dialect, in the region that inspired these landscapes and this river, would find more here. I . . . didn't.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marijan

    In all of the three books I've managed to read so far, Louis has managed to add something new to the story, some new twist, new protagonists, new surroundings. The only downside I could find for this one was that the heroes had it a bit to easy. And that Fawn is a little too clever for her age. But it was still interesting and captivating reading

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Dagger Knife and Baby Deer and the Continued Adventures with THE GHOST HAND I do love me these Grey Jedi stories I love everyone on this boat

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grillables

    I generally love Bujold, but this series just isn't for me. In this third book of the series, the pacing is slow, the protagonist can do no wrong, and the lovey-dovey bits make me wince. On the other hand, the characterizations are generally very fine (as always with Bujold). One more in the series to go, and then hopefully she'll be on to things that I find more appealing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn F.

    Audiobook I keep forgetting how young Fawn is. I like how the Lakewalkers aren't shown as completely good and the farmers mostly bad. Sad middle imagining what happened to the father and the rest of the crew. Enjoyable book/series. I'm planning on reading more of the series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Jo Walton had an interesting post on Tor.com a couple of weeks ago, about types of series, which helped crystallize some of my thoughts on why this series didn't quite work for me. It seems as though it's meant to be a series like The Lord of the Rings, which is essentially one book broken up into separate parts for publishing; in fact, if I recall correctly, the first two books of The Sharing Knife were presented as one book broken up. However, the overall feel of the series is more like what W Jo Walton had an interesting post on Tor.com a couple of weeks ago, about types of series, which helped crystallize some of my thoughts on why this series didn't quite work for me. It seems as though it's meant to be a series like The Lord of the Rings, which is essentially one book broken up into separate parts for publishing; in fact, if I recall correctly, the first two books of The Sharing Knife were presented as one book broken up. However, the overall feel of the series is more like what Walton calls "style two", in which there is an overarching story arc to the series, but each volume has its own story arc and closure. The problem I had is that each volume doesn't have quite enough story arc and closure; there's all too much journeying and too little action. My other major problem were the characters, especially Dag and Fawn, the two main characters. They're from two different cultures, and essentially the books are about how they first fall in love and become a couple, and then how they start to reconcile their separate cultures. But I found both of them too perfect to be truly interesting after the initial romance part: Dag is too noble, Fawn is too cleverly intuitive, always coming up with exactly the right suggestion. I felt as though they needed some balancing imperfections to make them more real (as Miles Vorkosigan feels real: brilliant, but with serious challenges). There's insufficient cost for the resolution to feel satisfying; nobody really loses much, and I never felt as though anyone was in real danger (again unlike the Vorkosigan books). What I did love was the worldbuilding, which is always one of Bujold's strengths. Here she gives us a frontier setting, like the American Wild West, where Dag's people are those who live with the land while Fawn's people are farmers. The magic is nature magic, the enemies (the malices) are like primeval, malevolent forces of nature. Interestingly, there are hints that the world itself developed from a more classically fantasy world, with kings and nobility. I don't want to be too negative here, because I did enjoy the books, or I wouldn't have read all four of them, and I really loved the world. I just don't think they're Bujold's best work, though I'd love to see her return to the world and do something else there.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    THis is the third book in Bujold's Dag and Fawn series and to my mind the best. Bujold is a fine writer and she has created a very interesting world. Dag is a Lakewalker exile and Fawn is his farmer wife. In earlier volumes in this series we learned that Lakewalkers, are hunters of evil Malices. The Malices are demons/aliens who kill and enslave people and grow and grow eating people's souls. The Malices cannot be killed by ordinary humans. The Lakewalkers discovered that if you stab a Malice wi THis is the third book in Bujold's Dag and Fawn series and to my mind the best. Bujold is a fine writer and she has created a very interesting world. Dag is a Lakewalker exile and Fawn is his farmer wife. In earlier volumes in this series we learned that Lakewalkers, are hunters of evil Malices. The Malices are demons/aliens who kill and enslave people and grow and grow eating people's souls. The Malices cannot be killed by ordinary humans. The Lakewalkers discovered that if you stab a Malice with a knife that contains the soul of dead Lakewalker, itcan kill the beast. The Lakewalkers use their ground sense to hunt Malices down and to heal their own folk, but the do not want to share their knowledge with others because it is a sacred trust. But their separation has allowed evil rumors to spread abou them and they are profoundly misunderstood and mistrusted by the farmers and other non Lakewalkers. On the otherhand the Lakewalkers look down on the farmers and others with some contempt. Dag who is married to Fawn has left his home camp and seeks a way to bridge the gap between the farmers and the Lakewalkers. Dag is also learning how to use his ground sense, which is very powerful and makes him a powerful healer. In this volume, he and Fawn and Fawn's brother Whit join together with Boss Berry, a captain of a river boat and her remaining family for a trip down a river for trade and adventure and so Dag can seek to help the farmers he encounters to better understand Lakewalkers. The trip is very eventful and Dag will have to use all of his resources to learn how his ground works. Moreover, various people from both Lakewalkers and non will join together on the boat. As others have said, you cannot read this book without having read the prior books, but this is definitely the best.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brownbetty

    I keep on reading Bujold's Sharing Knife books, because I keep on expecting Bujold to suddenly stop sucking and go back to being awesome. This is not the book in which she does that, and yet... To be honest, the problem with these books is not that they're bad, but rather that they're by Bujold, and they're not very good. I described them to Karen H. as a good book to take along on a long bus ride if you wanted to get your knitting done. However, I think if you took this book on a long bus ride, y I keep on reading Bujold's Sharing Knife books, because I keep on expecting Bujold to suddenly stop sucking and go back to being awesome. This is not the book in which she does that, and yet... To be honest, the problem with these books is not that they're bad, but rather that they're by Bujold, and they're not very good. I described them to Karen H. as a good book to take along on a long bus ride if you wanted to get your knitting done. However, I think if you took this book on a long bus ride, your knitting would not get done. This is not precisely high praise, and yet I did find this entry in the series more compelling than the previous two. It has all the problems of its predecessors, of course: Fawn remains too wise for her years, and the action in the book sort of drags. But, in this one, I think Bujold has finally gotten to the part of the story she was looking forward to, and it does actually become interesting in a purely "what happens next?" sort of way. I'm not saying anyone should go out and read the first two to get to this one, it's certainly not worth it, but if you've read the first two and were wondering if you ought to inflict this one on yourselves, I would cautiously recommend it. It may make you feel that the effort in reading the first two was not entirely wasted.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This books continues the story of Dag and Fawn; they're married and have essentially been kicked out of Dag's home, and are heading into the great wild world to see the sea, and maybe to find something to do with their lives. The focus of this book changes a bit... Dag and Fawn are still at the center of it, but rather than telling their story, this book starts to show how they can change the world around them. Over the course of the story, they start to build something new; a nomadic group of m This books continues the story of Dag and Fawn; they're married and have essentially been kicked out of Dag's home, and are heading into the great wild world to see the sea, and maybe to find something to do with their lives. The focus of this book changes a bit... Dag and Fawn are still at the center of it, but rather than telling their story, this book starts to show how they can change the world around them. Over the course of the story, they start to build something new; a nomadic group of mixed Lakewalkers and Farmers, who understand each other and play to each other's strengths. I really like this series. It's very slow and calm, and not very convoluted, so a big departure from Bujold's other books, which overflow with frenetic energy for the most part. The story is somewhat predictable, but not so much that it's annoying to read -- you know what they're going to do, but not exactly how, and the whole series is making the point that it's not the destination, but the journey, that's interesting. She's already written the fourth one, and I'm looking forward to reading that one too. But I want another Miles book, darnit!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    This was better than the second one, I felt the characters and background were more interesting. The research that went into the river boats was fascinating, and I enjoyed the author's note on her sources.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    I really enjoyed this series! Great story and nice character development and interactions. A lot to be learned about prejudices and trying to overcome them for the good of the whole.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elar

    This book is good example that you can write a good adventure story with no particular goal in sight. This book is like startup. Main character is highly qualified professional in its field - patrolling and eradicating malices. He sees opportunity to disrupt market to bring new and more effective measures into being, freeing resources and cutting costs (mainly count of dead people). But of course market does not want to change. So he does some R&D to get workable MVP ready to deploy everywhere. This book is good example that you can write a good adventure story with no particular goal in sight. This book is like startup. Main character is highly qualified professional in its field - patrolling and eradicating malices. He sees opportunity to disrupt market to bring new and more effective measures into being, freeing resources and cutting costs (mainly count of dead people). But of course market does not want to change. So he does some R&D to get workable MVP ready to deploy everywhere. He has some success and of course he also makes some mistakes, but as a good leader he tries to learn and innovate. With a ease he gathers team of capable people to help on his quest to make a world better place. Main character is not out for profit and in some cases helps on Pro Bono basis, but when needed more aggressive methods are deployed with a hostile takeover and dismantling of competing ventures.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Soo

    Mini-Review: Change is not comfortable. The story may have started off with a love story but it has evolved into a journey for understanding. The malices can cause immeasurable harm but there are not enough Lakewalkers to keep guard against them. There are more people who live in towns and cities. They have little knowledge about the malices. Dag has set himself on a path to bridge people together with knowledge. Will it work? There's only one more book in the series. I have my fingers crossed. O Mini-Review: Change is not comfortable. The story may have started off with a love story but it has evolved into a journey for understanding. The malices can cause immeasurable harm but there are not enough Lakewalkers to keep guard against them. There are more people who live in towns and cities. They have little knowledge about the malices. Dag has set himself on a path to bridge people together with knowledge. Will it work? There's only one more book in the series. I have my fingers crossed. Obviously it will not be an ultimate ending because lives go on beyond the pages of the tale, but I do hope the main topics will be tied up nice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Scudiero

    Part of a series of 4.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Frith

    This was so CHARMING.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    I was disappointed with Lois McMaster Bujold's previous book in this series, The Sharing Knife: Legacy. While an okay read, it didn't come anywhere near what I know Bujold is capable of producing and, as much as it felt like blasphemy to say it, I found significant portions of it just plain boring. (My review is here.) Because of that I had decided to get this new book from the library rather than buy a hardcover. Then it came out and got good reviews on blogs I trust - and I remembered how much I was disappointed with Lois McMaster Bujold's previous book in this series, The Sharing Knife: Legacy. While an okay read, it didn't come anywhere near what I know Bujold is capable of producing and, as much as it felt like blasphemy to say it, I found significant portions of it just plain boring. (My review is here.) Because of that I had decided to get this new book from the library rather than buy a hardcover. Then it came out and got good reviews on blogs I trust - and I remembered how much it annoys me to have Paladin of Souls in paperback tucked in among all my other Bujold hardcovers. So I weakened and bought it. I'm very glad I did. Bujold is back to form here and tells a lovely tale of a new marriage and how the partners in it complement each other as they find their way in the world. Of course, this is Dag and Fawn, so a bevy of extra complications ensue, from fitting in (or not) with Lakewalkers and farmers to defeating an evil that, this time, isn't a malice. Dag is also trying to figure out for himself how to be both a healer and a maker without any guidance or instruction. Again it is the Lakewalkers, in their arrogant superiority, who come off worst here as people in new camps again refuse to believe in Dag's marriage to Fawn or to be willing to help them. The farmers they meet are more accomodating and even begin to gain some understanding of Lakewalker practices as Dag begins letting a lot of secret cats out of bags. But his haphazard methods seem to work and as the two young Lakewalkers with the group also begin to learn new ways the book shows that you can't change a society (or in this case, two) all at once but you can change people one at a time. Bujold has said that, for the first two books in the series at least, she was trying to tell a story that was an equal balance of romance and fantasy. I've seen other authors try to do the same and I have to say that I am beginning to suspect that this simply isn't possible. Nothing is going to balance perfectly and when you try to bring in people who read in two different genres, aspects of the story are likely to annoy one of them - or possibly both of them. Even for someone like me - I enjoy both genres - I find that all the "mixed" books I've read still fall more to one side of the divide or the other. You still get a romance with strong fantasy elements or you get a fantasy with strong romantic elements. Trying for an equal balance really doesn't seem to work. Going for a 60-40 mix rather than a 50-50 seems to me to produce a better book. Of course that's just my opinion and possibly not even relevant to this book - which is definitely a fantasy with romantic elements and an exploration of a new marriage and partnership. But reading this book got me thinking about the topic and that's my conclusion. Dag's growing abilities with his groundsense are an important part of this book and he's discovering that there is a lot of information certain members of the Lakewalker community must have that the general population knows nothing about. He's making it all up as he goes along and while he's finding solutions, he's aware they may not be the most efficent or elegant ones. Of course, the questions he's asking may not have been asked before either, so whether or not a willing Lakewalker mentor could even help him is unknown. Of course, he doesn't have one of those, so the point is moot. But it becomes clear as the series progresses that one of its themes is that while some secrets are necessary, on the whole they tend to cause more harm than good. If, like me, you were disappointed by the previous book, don't let it stop you reading this one. It is a very pleasant return to form for the author. The Sharing Knife: Passage Lois McMaster Bujold The Sharing Knife, Book 3 9/10

  19. 4 out of 5

    Khari

    This was the best book of the series so far.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott Marlowe (Out of this World Reviews)

    Rating Review *** This review originally appeared on Out of this World Reviews. *** Passage is the third book in Bujold's Sharing Knife series. It is a continuation of the story begun in Beguilement and Legacy. In Legacy, Dag and Fawn come face-to-face with the bigotry of Dag's Lakewalker clan. Near driven out, Dag chooses to leave instead. But he does so with a mission in mind: to heal the rift between Lakewalker and farmer. On one level this mission of Dag's is a personal one: acceptance of each o Rating Review *** This review originally appeared on Out of this World Reviews. *** Passage is the third book in Bujold's Sharing Knife series. It is a continuation of the story begun in Beguilement and Legacy. In Legacy, Dag and Fawn come face-to-face with the bigotry of Dag's Lakewalker clan. Near driven out, Dag chooses to leave instead. But he does so with a mission in mind: to heal the rift between Lakewalker and farmer. On one level this mission of Dag's is a personal one: acceptance of each of the peoples amongst the other would grant his marriage a greater acceptance. On another level it is a matter of long term survival for all. Because there is little communication between Lakewalker and farmer, the scourge of their land, called malices, could potentially run rampant someday because farmers remain ignorant of the early warning signs. It is with the intention of educating farmers of the malice danger that Dag sets out from his home with his wife, Fawn. They hire themselves out to a flatboat boss, Berry, and Dag begins his journey of farmer healing and enlightenment. They are joined by two other Lakewalkers and a motley lot of farmers/riverboat-types who are drawn to Dag and Fawn's mission in their own individual ways. Much of the story focuses on this personal quest of Dag's and how, in the process, he also develops his 'ground' (magic) to a level not hereto seen in the world. That bears some explanation: in Lakewalker society an individual is chosen early on for a specific vocation based upon the promise of their ground. Such vocations include patroller, medicine-maker, ground-setter. The principal responsibility of the Lakewalkers is patrolling the lands in search of malice; most Lakewalkers are selected as patrollers. But some others who demonstrate a greater degree of 'groundsense' may become medicine-makers or, even further, ground-setters, able to manipulate almost any material. Dag has already spent most of his life as a patroller by the time we meet him in Beguilement. In Passage, he begins to experiment with his groundsense and, aided by Fawn's knack for seeing things from her own unique perspective, finds that he has the ability to bridge the gap between patroller, medicine-maker, and ground-setter. Passage is a good book. It's well-written, flows evenly, and possesses a myriad of interesting yet believable characters. But it also stumbles a bit in its singular purpose. Dag's quest is fun to follow, but it becomes too much of the story or, really, the entire story. Not until the end, when Dag must face a renegade Lakewalker and the mayhem he's caused, does the storyline break away into new territory. In short, I felt Passage would have benefited from a bit more going on. There is some mystery in the form of Boatboss Berry, whose family has disappeared somewhere downriver, but it's not enough. In summary, Bujold doesn't disappoint in once again delivering a folksy tale with plenty of interesting and intriguing characters and magic. In the end, though, Passage could have used an injection of something more. Regardless, I'm looking forward to the conclusion of Dag and Fawn's journey in book four, Horizon.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    I’m not really sure what to say about this book. It was so. . . flat. No character seems to read like they should. Dag does not read like he is mature and upwards of 50 years old (or whatever ridiculously age he was given when Bujold wanted to write about a Pedophile. And all I can think of is Dag yelling at his friends “She was 18 dude it was all LEGAL!”) while Fawn doesn’t read like she has much of a personality beyond supporting Dag. Maybe I just don’t like her very much but whenever Fawn star I’m not really sure what to say about this book. It was so. . . flat. No character seems to read like they should. Dag does not read like he is mature and upwards of 50 years old (or whatever ridiculously age he was given when Bujold wanted to write about a Pedophile. And all I can think of is Dag yelling at his friends “She was 18 dude it was all LEGAL!”) while Fawn doesn’t read like she has much of a personality beyond supporting Dag. Maybe I just don’t like her very much but whenever Fawn starts to talk I find my eyes have rolled across the living room floor and I get a break from reading this mess to go pick them up again. It’s like she’s there just to remind readers of facts they forgot: “But Dag didn’t you say _________.” “Oh that’s right Spark!” -Problem Solved- And oops my eyes rolled away on me again. I don’t feel driven by the main save-the-whole-world-with-love-and-understanding plot because it’s just not that interesting. It’s an old man whining “why can’t we all just be friends?”. I found the other characters more interesting but even they fell flat along the way. I’m not sure what it is but I found the only good part of this book started way too late. Not only that, but the book drags on at the end. It wasn’t as bad as some of the books I’ve read this year but it won’t be anything I’ll remember either. I wish I had’ve picked up a different book by Bujold first because reading these ones have sort of turned me off her. It’s sad because when the series first started and Fawn was pregnant two options opened up to me: “Wow” I thought. “It’s not normal someone gives their main character a handicap like this at the beginning of a book. Hmm. . . Most people don’t do this. Ok there are two ways this will turn out, 1. She’ll actually be a pregnant main character. Or… 2. She’ll lose the baby.” I read through more of the book. “And of course she loses the baby. How tragic, a thing I wasn’t attached to and neither was the main character, is gone and no longer a burden. Ho hum… all that potential gone.” And those thoughts, the ones I had at the very beginning of the book about Fawn’s baby, those apply to this entire series. Ho Hum so much wasted potential.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Baum

    Second read 5/12/16 The thing that struck me the most on my reread (listen) of this book is just how complex Dag is. He's learning to deal with his past, learning about himself as he slowly changes into a new Dag (yet is still somehow himself), and learning both about and how to deal with others in ways he never needed before. I'm not so much sucked into the plot as I am sucked into Dag's progression. Even the tiniest things, like him ground-ripping oats, seem fascinating and intense. Once again, Second read 5/12/16 The thing that struck me the most on my reread (listen) of this book is just how complex Dag is. He's learning to deal with his past, learning about himself as he slowly changes into a new Dag (yet is still somehow himself), and learning both about and how to deal with others in ways he never needed before. I'm not so much sucked into the plot as I am sucked into Dag's progression. Even the tiniest things, like him ground-ripping oats, seem fascinating and intense. Once again, the audio narration is fabulous. Mental note: need to seek out other books read by Bernadette Dunne. First read 6/19/13 This was a really enjoyable installment of the series, possibly my favorite so far--though they're all pretty equal, so it's hard to say that for sure. The new characters who were introduced were vibrant and enjoyable, the familiar characters grew and learned from new experiences, and the challenges they all faced made for a good read. I really enjoy the progression of these books, and how they all tell a complete tale (or at least a relatively complete one--book one did feel a bit chopped off) and yet take place one after another. It's like getting a nice breaking spot before starting on the next chapter. I've already bought book 4 (sadly, the last). I can't remember the last time I went straight through a series like this. Good stuff.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hirondelle

    This is so slow it took me 2 years to finish it. But still it was worth it and interesting (to me), and so far my favorite of this series. What I did not like: - it is slow. Seriously. - The dystopia. And small (though getting larger in this book) universe just gives me claustrophobia. - main characters are so lovey-dovey in love, impossibly wise and unnaturally powerful. - and seriously, I want to know what happens to baby raccoon. It disappeared from narrative, and yes, I do want to know. What I l This is so slow it took me 2 years to finish it. But still it was worth it and interesting (to me), and so far my favorite of this series. What I did not like: - it is slow. Seriously. - The dystopia. And small (though getting larger in this book) universe just gives me claustrophobia. - main characters are so lovey-dovey in love, impossibly wise and unnaturally powerful. - and seriously, I want to know what happens to baby raccoon. It disappeared from narrative, and yes, I do want to know. What I liked: - the midwest american feeling of this fantasy setting. I am not, but have a fondness and this reminded me a bit of Tom Sawyer and Little House on the Prairie. And it is more believable than some european-esque medieval settins which make no sense to me at all (but then I am european, so maybe it is just the unfamiliar seeming more likely). - the writing is nice, characters well developed (Apart from extra perfection sometimes). - and best of all, I liked that this is a book in which the rules of the universe are explored and tested, in which characters try actively to change their universe for the best, and test their (magical) powers to the limit. Reminded me of Discworld a bit, in that it is also a book about trying to transform for the better a universe.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brie

    Passage was a great follow up to both Beguilement and Legacy. Dag and Fawn's journey is entertaining and eye opening. The world building is nothing short of awesome. The Lakewalker mythology, while very intricate, is completely understandable and the writing is simply enchanting. The relationship between Dag and Fawn continues to evolve as they settle into married life, though much of the romance is put on the backburner in this story and it focuses more on Farmer/Lakewalker relations. Prejudice Passage was a great follow up to both Beguilement and Legacy. Dag and Fawn's journey is entertaining and eye opening. The world building is nothing short of awesome. The Lakewalker mythology, while very intricate, is completely understandable and the writing is simply enchanting. The relationship between Dag and Fawn continues to evolve as they settle into married life, though much of the romance is put on the backburner in this story and it focuses more on Farmer/Lakewalker relations. Prejudices and superstitions are addressed as Dag tries to find a way to unite the two peoples. Overall, Passage was a thought provoking book. Like the first two in the series, it moves at a moderate pace, paying close attention to the characters and their interactions and struggles. The Sharing Knife series has fast become one of my favorite Fantasy series to date. I've written before about how I like my fantasy to have strong female protagonists, understandable mythology, a little romance, some action, and a good writing. I find all that and more in this series. I'm looking forward to reading the conclusion of Dag and Fawn's story in the final book, Horizon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samrat

    Yeah. I'm digging it. It's like fluffy romance with magic and homesteading and a riverboat full of fairly fleshed-out fellows (and one plucky captain fixing to find her family). Pretty much like those Amish books probably but without the regressive gender roles and with more realistic world-building. Fast and compelling like everything my gal Bujold writes. I'm increasingly suspicious of these Lakewalkers as stand-ins for Native people and the kind of magical primitivism trope but eh we'll see ho Yeah. I'm digging it. It's like fluffy romance with magic and homesteading and a riverboat full of fairly fleshed-out fellows (and one plucky captain fixing to find her family). Pretty much like those Amish books probably but without the regressive gender roles and with more realistic world-building. Fast and compelling like everything my gal Bujold writes. I'm increasingly suspicious of these Lakewalkers as stand-ins for Native people and the kind of magical primitivism trope but eh we'll see how it pans out. There's a good enough exchange of honoring each other's knowledge that makes it a little less the colonialism/vengeance dynamic and some worthwhile maybe it seems magic or barbaric cause you haven't bothered to understand them themes, the message being slightly undercut by Lakewalkers basically being actual magicians-by-another-name. Also, jeez, this cheesy cover art where somehow Dag's repeatedly described as copper skin -- and with kin named as caramel, honey, brown -- means idk... at least he's a slightly tanner white guy than book two. (Pasty-faced on the theoretically concluding book four, I see.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janine

    I just couldn't do it anymore. I quit. I have never quit this far into a series and rarely give up on books I've read this much of. I'd already had enough of Fawn's bouncing and curl tossing. And I've managed to get this far in the series despite my strong dislike for a love story between a 55 year old and an 18 year old. But, for some reason Fawn's dismay at not being able to fathom how to fit a large fish into a pan was just too much for me: "How do you fit it in a pan?" Fawn nearly wailed. Sh I just couldn't do it anymore. I quit. I have never quit this far into a series and rarely give up on books I've read this much of. I'd already had enough of Fawn's bouncing and curl tossing. And I've managed to get this far in the series despite my strong dislike for a love story between a 55 year old and an 18 year old. But, for some reason Fawn's dismay at not being able to fathom how to fit a large fish into a pan was just too much for me: "How do you fit it in a pan?" Fawn nearly wailed. She pictured it draped across her skillet with an arm's length hanging over each side. She wouldn't be able to lift it. Could it be cooked on a turnspit, like a roasting pig? You cut it! You cut the fish you stupid bit- calm. Breathe. It's just a character in a book. A character that is so smart she can figure things out no one else can, but can't figure out that you can cut a fucking fish before cooking it. There are too many books I want to read to bother any more with this series. Time to create a did-not-finish shelf.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Trin

    A much more engaging and fulfilling installment than the last book in the series, Legacy. I enjoyed seeing Dag and Fawn’s quest to better integrate the Lakewalker and Farmer societies take shape; I liked the reintroduction of Fawn’s brother, Whit; and I loved when the story became a river narrative, a kind of Huckleberry Finn with magic. I hope there’s another volume; I’m still not convinced that Dag isn’t getting into something dark and dangerous and way over his head, and that Fawn’s going to A much more engaging and fulfilling installment than the last book in the series, Legacy. I enjoyed seeing Dag and Fawn’s quest to better integrate the Lakewalker and Farmer societies take shape; I liked the reintroduction of Fawn’s brother, Whit; and I loved when the story became a river narrative, a kind of Huckleberry Finn with magic. I hope there’s another volume; I’m still not convinced that Dag isn’t getting into something dark and dangerous and way over his head, and that Fawn’s going to need to pull him back. I like how Bujold writes her—so unassumingly clever and sensible, yet believable, where in a lesser writer’s hands I think she would easily become an utter blank or a Mary Sue—but I feel like she hasn’t reached her full potential yet, and I’d like to see that—a little forced self-reliance, separate from Dag, before the two of them have their final happily ever after. So…next book soon, plz?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Preacher

    This was actually a little more fantasy than romance, although it's still much more character development than action. (Apparently the first two volumes were intended as one book, which explains some of their pacing issues, and this was written from the start as a single volume.) It hung together for me much better than the previous two, although it's still a leisurely book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katey

    This one did not move nearly as fast as the other two I've read thus far. It's still not *bad* but there were more times when I found my mind wandering as she was describing something. The first two books were more compelling, and I read them much faster. On the plus side, I didn't stay up late reading the end of this one, so it was better for my sleep. :)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Jones

    OMG! This book is a wonderful addition to the series. Off to book 4 to finish it off. The characters are what make this. If you read this, be prepared to spend hours reading and not wanting it to end.

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