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Little Knife

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In this third Ravkan folk tale from Leigh Bardugo, a beautiful girl finds that what her father wants for her and what she wants for herself are two different things. It is a companion story to the third book of the Grisha Trilogy, Ruin and Rising, and the stories “The Witch of Duva” and “The Too-Clever Fox.”


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In this third Ravkan folk tale from Leigh Bardugo, a beautiful girl finds that what her father wants for her and what she wants for herself are two different things. It is a companion story to the third book of the Grisha Trilogy, Ruin and Rising, and the stories “The Witch of Duva” and “The Too-Clever Fox.”

30 review for Little Knife

  1. 5 out of 5

    ~Poppy~

    "Will you remain here with the father who tried to sell you, or the Prince who hoped to buy you, or the man too weak to solve his riddles for himself? Or will you come with me and be bride to nothing but the shore?” Wow, I loved it!! I loved "Little Knife" aka the river!! "She lived in happy solitude, and grew old, and never worried when her beauty faded, for in her reflection she always saw a free woman." "Will you remain here with the father who tried to sell you, or the Prince who hoped to buy you, or the man too weak to solve his riddles for himself? Or will you come with me and be bride to nothing but the shore?” Wow, I loved it!! I loved "Little Knife" aka the river!! "She lived in happy solitude, and grew old, and never worried when her beauty faded, for in her reflection she always saw a free woman."

  2. 5 out of 5

    karen

    so, yeah - bardugo is three for three in these tor shorts. i have always loved fairy tales, since i was a little sprout, and the darker they were, the better i liked them. and when i discovered, as a slightly larger seedling, the phenomenon of taking fairytales and retelling or modernizing them, it was a wonderful thing indeed, because the authors retained the spirit of the original works, but made them slightly less didactic and simplistic and therefore a little more ambiguous. they tended to be so, yeah - bardugo is three for three in these tor shorts. i have always loved fairy tales, since i was a little sprout, and the darker they were, the better i liked them. and when i discovered, as a slightly larger seedling, the phenomenon of taking fairytales and retelling or modernizing them, it was a wonderful thing indeed, because the authors retained the spirit of the original works, but made them slightly less didactic and simplistic and therefore a little more ambiguous. they tended to be less facile in their moral distinctions, which was more appealing to me, because it seemed truer and more sophisticated; they demanded more from the reader in processing the stories. bardugo kicks ass at this. this one has the shape and all the elements of a classic, traditional fairy tale. the daughter of the duke, whose beauty was beyond reckoning: There is some debate over what Yeva Luchova actually looked like, whether her hair was burnished gold or lustrous black, whether her eyes were blue as sapphires or green as new grass. It is not the particulars of her beauty but the power of it that concerns us, and we need only know that Yeva was lovely from the moment of her birth. She was so beautiful, in fact, that the midwife attending her mother snatched up the wailing infant and locked herself in a linen closet, begging for just another moment to gaze upon Yeva’s face and refusing to relinquish the baby until the Duke called for an axe to break down the door. The Duke had the midwife whipped, but that didn’t stop several of Yeva’s nursemaids from trying to steal the child away. Finally, her father hired a blind old woman to care for his daughter, and there was peace in his home. Of course, that peace did not last, for Yeva only grew more beautiful as she aged. and her beauty also becomes more dangerous as she ages. she is drugged and (temporarily) kidnapped by an artist smitten with her, men fight to the death for the honor of becoming her suitor, and When Yeva stopped to remove a stone from her shoe and unwittingly gave the crowd a glimpse of her perfect ankle, a riot broke out, and her father decided she must be confined to the palace. also true to the genre is the strategic manipulation on the part of her father in the arrangement of her marriage when yeva comes of age. like all good fairytales, the duke sets out three increasingly-difficult challenges for her prospective suitors, making sure he will personally benefit from the end-products of these challenges, and also arranging it so the prince has the advantage over all other suitors. yeva questions her father's every decision, understanding that arbitrary contests are no way to determine the worth of a man, or his suitability as a life-partner, but not understanding the extent of her father's greed or that her unconditional love for her father is not reciprocated, because a daughter is a commodity, and only as valuable as the highest bidder for her hand. but there's aways a dark horse. and this is where bardugo really shines. she continues to structure the story pretty closely to the expectations of the fairy tale genre: unlikely candidate for the hand of the lovely young thing, magical/supernatural assistance, challenges handily won by the underdog, but then she subverts these expectations with a blammo ending that gives yeva the agency so few female characters in fairytales ever enjoy. i have loved all three of these stories, and i just bought the last book in her trilogy, which i will be marathoning as soon as i possibly can. if they are anything like this, i am going to melt into the happiest reader-puddle ever. read it for yourself here: http://www.tor.com/stories/2014/06/li... come to my blog!

  3. 5 out of 5

    P

    “And should you ever take a bride, listen closely to her questions. In them you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea.” Leigh Bardugo is a talented author. When she tells a story, the dark twists are prominent and very successful to shock me. As for Little Knife, a very short story based on the Grisha world, I found out that this novella was enjoyable even though it was more like a tale for me. Something unreal and impossible happens and takes do “And should you ever take a bride, listen closely to her questions. In them you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea.” Leigh Bardugo is a talented author. When she tells a story, the dark twists are prominent and very successful to shock me. As for Little Knife, a very short story based on the Grisha world, I found out that this novella was enjoyable even though it was more like a tale for me. Something unreal and impossible happens and takes down everything I want to see at the end. I was perplexed by the conclusion of it. Dark and insidious.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    "Little Knife" is one of Leigh Bardugo's excellent short stories set in her Grisha universe. This one used to be up on Tor.com but apparently Bardugo or her publisher got them to pull it and The Too-Clever Fox when she was putting together The Language of Thorns collection. Now that I'm (finally) reading that collection, it was great to see my old friend "Little Knife" again. It's fascinating to see Bardugo subverting so many traditional fairy tale tropes here. The duke's daughter Yeva is surpas "Little Knife" is one of Leigh Bardugo's excellent short stories set in her Grisha universe. This one used to be up on Tor.com but apparently Bardugo or her publisher got them to pull it and The Too-Clever Fox when she was putting together The Language of Thorns collection. Now that I'm (finally) reading that collection, it was great to see my old friend "Little Knife" again. It's fascinating to see Bardugo subverting so many traditional fairy tale tropes here. The duke's daughter Yeva is surpassingly beautiful ... so beautiful that it makes people crazy: nurses and midwives fight over her and try to kidnap her as a baby (her father the duke ends up hiring a blind nurse for her), reasonable men come to blows over her, and she can't ever go outside. So Yeva's father decides when she's about 16 that he needs to marry her off, and holds a contest with challenges because that's what prideful dukes get to do in these tales. It's clearly not as much fun as it might sound for the girl.When her father returned to the palace and Yeva heard what he had done, she said, "Papa, forgive me, but what way is this to find a husband? Soon I will have a fine mirror, but will I have a good man?" Nor for her father, in this case. He figures that his favored suitor, the prince, will be able to use his wealth and servants to win all the challenges, but there's a Grisha Tidemaker (with magical power over water) who comes into town just as the first challenge is getting rolling. It ... doesn't work out the way you might guess. Now, if you have been foolish enough to wander from the path, it is up to you to make your way back to the road... If you are lucky, you will find your friends again. They will pat you on the back and soothe you with their laughter. But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kainat 《HUFFLEPUFF & PROUD》

    “I am no blunt knife to cut your sorry bread,” it said. “I feed the fields and drown the harvest. I am bounty and destruction.” Even though I am not a big fan of the Grisha series, I absolutely love these short stories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wren (fablesandwren)

    WrensReads Review: THIS IS JUST LIKE A GRIMM FAIRYTALE BUT BETTER. "But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it." This was absolutely beautiful. You have everything you need. ☑ Unbelievably pretty girl thrown into hiding by her father ☑ Greedy Duke who only wants to profit from his daughter's beauty ☑ A prince fighting for her hand ☑ A poor man who is friend's with the river fighting for her hand ☑ Three task set the faith of the pretty girl It is li WrensReads Review: THIS IS JUST LIKE A GRIMM FAIRYTALE BUT BETTER. "But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it." This was absolutely beautiful. You have everything you need. ☑ Unbelievably pretty girl thrown into hiding by her father ☑ Greedy Duke who only wants to profit from his daughter's beauty ☑ A prince fighting for her hand ☑ A poor man who is friend's with the river fighting for her hand ☑ Three task set the faith of the pretty girl It is literally just like a fairytale and it made me so happpppy! WrensReads | Goodreads | Twitter | Instagram

  7. 4 out of 5

    ♥ℂĦℝΪՖƬΪℕÅ

    “She was terrifying in her beauty, bright like a devouring star.” This novella was wonderfully good :) It was very captivating and I was hooked! This was about an absolutely breathtakingly stunning girl named Yeva. She is the duke's daughter. He is desperately trying to find the perfect suitor and therefore he sets out all these different challenges. Yeva's beauty makes men lose their minds at the sight of her and all want to clam her as their own. The ending message was powerful and lovely♥. And “She was terrifying in her beauty, bright like a devouring star.” This novella was wonderfully good :) It was very captivating and I was hooked! This was about an absolutely breathtakingly stunning girl named Yeva. She is the duke's daughter. He is desperately trying to find the perfect suitor and therefore he sets out all these different challenges. Yeva's beauty makes men lose their minds at the sight of her and all want to clam her as their own. The ending message was powerful and lovely♥. And that twist at the end I did not see coming! It was PERFECT. Honestly, this was so worth the read and I recommend Y'all taking the time to read it :) “But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it. And should you ever take a bride, listen closely to her questions. In them, you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Thanks to the lovely karen I found this little gem. Leigh Bardugo can write! I love this type of story. At first I didn't think I was going to like Little Knife much because we had the perfect girl. Yeva-her beauty was enough to make men lose their senses, cause fights, yada yada. Then her father the duke decided it was time for her to marry and figured was for himself to prosper. Life has a way of not working out like you figure. Thanks to the lovely karen I found this little gem. Leigh Bardugo can write! I love this type of story. At first I didn't think I was going to like Little Knife much because we had the perfect girl. Yeva-her beauty was enough to make men lose their senses, cause fights, yada yada. Then her father the duke decided it was time for her to marry and figured was for himself to prosper. Life has a way of not working out like you figure.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Now there's an ending I didn't see coming. I like it. :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣

    Little Knife is the third and final folk tale accompanying the Grisha trilogy. As with The Witch of Duva and The Too-Clever Fox, this one can be read apart from the trilogy. This is a story about greed and how it can ruin everything. And it is beautiful. All Revka folk tales are beautiful. You should read them all, whether you wish to read the trilogy or not. Little Knife is the third and final folk tale accompanying the Grisha trilogy. As with The Witch of Duva and The Too-Clever Fox, this one can be read apart from the trilogy. This is a story about greed and how it can ruin everything. And it is beautiful. All Revka folk tales are beautiful. You should read them all, whether you wish to read the trilogy or not.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This can be found online here: http://www.tor.com/2014/06/26/little-... This is an accompanying short story to the Grisha series but can be read as a stand-alone piece. Another mesmerising tale, inspired by classic folk lore. The subversion in this story was unprecedented and the ending was especially lovely. The moralistic conclusion provided a wry final commentary that stretched further than the confines of this actual tale. I am enjoying these later accompanying tales even more than the original This can be found online here: http://www.tor.com/2014/06/26/little-... This is an accompanying short story to the Grisha series but can be read as a stand-alone piece. Another mesmerising tale, inspired by classic folk lore. The subversion in this story was unprecedented and the ending was especially lovely. The moralistic conclusion provided a wry final commentary that stretched further than the confines of this actual tale. I am enjoying these later accompanying tales even more than the original trilogy and would love for a whole collection of these to be created. Lyrical and enchanting, this is a beautiful and bewitching piece of prose.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~

    "Remember that to use a thing is not to own it..." Oh my gosh! This one was BY FAR my favorite of the Grisha Tales. It's not that it's incredibly original per say, but it's so neat that Bardugo thought up these little stories that fit into her world. I think it really helps the world come alive, even if it doesn't directly involve the characters from The Grisha Trilogy. All three of these are an absolute delight.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marnie (Enchanted Bibliophile)

    "She was terrifying in her beauty, bright like a devouring star." It’s the little things that make Bardugo the master storyteller that she is. Like how after I’ve read this story; and realized it was one that Mal told Alina in the Prolog of Ruin and Rising. And Sergei getting posted at a way-station near Duva. This is the type of things that makes me feel part of the Grishaverse. Like I’m living in there world. The other thing I enjoy is that the stories never go where I expect them to go. The twis "She was terrifying in her beauty, bright like a devouring star." It’s the little things that make Bardugo the master storyteller that she is. Like how after I’ve read this story; and realized it was one that Mal told Alina in the Prolog of Ruin and Rising. And Sergei getting posted at a way-station near Duva. This is the type of things that makes me feel part of the Grishaverse. Like I’m living in there world. The other thing I enjoy is that the stories never go where I expect them to go. The twist leaves me in awe every time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Len Evans Jr

    "remember to use a thing is not to own it." I think this story is my favorite of the book thus far. The imagery is lush, the story is enthralling and the people populating it flawed. The author has once again created something to rival those fairy tales of old! A fun, tale of caution as well as an awesome read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    "Remember that to use a thing is not to own it." It's not a secret that I will read anything Leigh Bardugo writes. And every time I have the same question. How is it possible? How is it possible that her novellas and books are so good? I'm not sure I blinked while reading. "Little Knife" is a nicely written story with a moral and it gripped me from start to finish. And. And I want moooore fairy tales from Bardugo :((

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erica Ravenclaw

    ☆ ☆☆ ☆ No spoilers and colorful language abound! The Witch of Duva The Too-Clever Fox I was a little "meh" until the very end, and BOOM. Do it. You are welcome. ☆ ☆☆ ☆ No spoilers and colorful language abound! The Witch of Duva The Too-Clever Fox I was a little "meh" until the very end, and BOOM. Do it. You are welcome.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Denisse

    Forget about novels, Leigh Bardugo, I can see myself in the future buying a book with only your short stories/tales. I'm not kidding. This woman has talent for short stories. Hagan a un lado la trilogía de Los Grisha, las historias cortas que ha escrito en el mismo mundo son mil veces mejores. Ojala se aventurara en hacer un libro con puras historias cortas como esta. Un mensaje sencillo y una escritura impecable. ...remember that to use a thing is not to own it...,listen closely to her questi Forget about novels, Leigh Bardugo, I can see myself in the future buying a book with only your short stories/tales. I'm not kidding. This woman has talent for short stories. Hagan a un lado la trilogía de Los Grisha, las historias cortas que ha escrito en el mismo mundo son mil veces mejores. Ojala se aventurara en hacer un libro con puras historias cortas como esta. Un mensaje sencillo y una escritura impecable. ...remember that to use a thing is not to own it...,listen closely to her questions. In them you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea. PD: Se me ha ocurrido un shelf nuevo, gracias Bardugo!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Dude. I would gladly read a whole book filled with such short stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow)

    the river is a gay icon saving the girl from those men

  20. 4 out of 5

    Exitgirl05

    Little Knife resembles the most to Russian folk tales. That’s probably the reason why I liked it. A beautiful noble girl, a poor boy longing for fortune and a good life and a moral at the end of the story. Good job by Leigh Bardugo!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karlyflower *The Vampire Ninja, Luminescent Monster & Wendigo Nerd Goddess of Canada (according to The Hulk)*

    Okay, that's it..... I'm in love with a woman!! This has never happened to me before..... but Leigh Bardugo, you win my fairytale loving heart.... hands-down my favourite tor-short thus far

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mairéad (is roaming the Undying Lands)

    {December 11th, 2014} MINI-REVIEW 4 stars. A very spooky fairytale that truly paints an important moral (or morals). Truly something to read to keep the Grishaverse alive for you. Wish I could say more but kind of hard without spoiling anything. x:

  23. 4 out of 5

    isabelle

    Leigh Bardugo is a wizard with words and dark tales.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anya (~on a semi-hiatus~)

    "To use a thing is not to own it." I'm positively reeling. Rtc.

  25. 5 out of 5

    daisy

    Okay, but when is Leigh Bardugo going to write a book of fairytales? I need that in my life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

    Little Knife is the third Ravkan folktale accompanying the Grisha novels and probably the one I liked the least. It was not bad, Bardugo has a real talent for writing fairytales that’s undeniable, it's just that it was not as good as the previous two. That being said, I must admit that this story has so many incredible sentences that make fantastic quotes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈

    But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it. And should you ever take a bride, listen closely to her questions. In them you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea. I admit that I have been in a bit of a funk lately. I'm not quite sure when it started, but I'm not sure of the cause of it or whether I can even pinpoint one exact cause in the first place. Reading used to get me out of these funks, But as you leave that dark gap in the trees behind, remember that to use a thing is not to own it. And should you ever take a bride, listen closely to her questions. In them you may hear her true name like the thunder of a lost river, like the sighing of the sea. I admit that I have been in a bit of a funk lately. I'm not quite sure when it started, but I'm not sure of the cause of it or whether I can even pinpoint one exact cause in the first place. Reading used to get me out of these funks, used to transport me to a whole other world and books were my escape from life when the funks of my life got a little outta control. Only, for whatever reason, this time its different. Reading books is just not doing it for me right now, and this is the first time ever that this has happened to me. I'm not sure whether its lack of time, or nothing has really blown me away as of late, or whether my life in general is telling me that book-escape really doesn't solve all my problems. However, these tor shorts have kinda been my lifeline the past few months. They are short, and therefore allow me time to complete them without seasons changing, and they are mostly fantasy or paranormal and therefore NOT AT ALL REAL which is exactly what my all-too-real-life needs right now. I began this one because I read The Witch of Duva and The Too-Clever Fox and absolutely loved the dark and escapist tone, the fairytale elements, the twisty endings that I don't see coming. Also several of my friends rated this one quite high. I wasn't disappointed. I enjoyed Little Knife very much. But. I didn't enjoy it as much as Bardugo's other two. In fact, this was actually teetering on a 3.5, but rounded up because I really love her style of writing, and good writing always gets kudos. I took a couple days on this review because I wanted this short to stew inside my head, and I wanted some time to think about why I didn't enjoy this one as much, when several friends enjoyed it more. I think that if I had read this one first, it would have gotten higher marks. Now I have not read Bardugo's Grisha trilogy (though it is on my ever-increasing pile) so I can only compare this one to her other shorts, and I thought it may have been just a little too similar to the other two. It is the only story of hers in which the ending was not as much of a shock, and I thought it was by far the least dark of the three fables (I am the weirdo who likes the dark). Anywhoo, this fable is about a beautiful girl whose beauty is actually more of a curse than a blessing. Men try to kidnap her, maids try to steal her away, fights break out all over the kindgom....we've seen this before. A beautiful girl makes a very happy daddy because then daddy gets a very very large bargaining chip when it comes time for her to marry. He sets up tasks for her suitors to see who can win her hand, all the time trying to manipulate the outcome so that the prince will win her. The girl (named Yeva), always the dutiful and respectful daughter, tries to speak up to ask her father what is the point of these meaningless tasks and how they will prove a man's worth as a husband. Daddy dearest, with dollar signs behind his eyeballs, just shooshes her and kisses her cheek with one of those "daddy's handling it sweetie, go look pretty some more" dismissal waves. Out of the woodwork comes Semyon, a poor man also in love with Yeva, who at first just seems like the poor man with a heart of gold that will triumph due to his virtue. But as we have learned with all of Bardugo's stories, things are not always as they appear to be. I enjoyed the overall message of this story, and I really enjoy Bardugo's characterization and how she strives to break down stereotypes and typecasts that are strewn throughout not only folktales, but a lot of YA literature. On the surface, we have the doting beautiful girl with a head full of sawdust, who knows of nothing except to be dutiful and virtuous and beautiful to the subjects who love her. The power-hungry father who sacrifices parental devotion for manipulation and greed, and the troubled hero, poor but true who ultimately will win the day and the fair lady's heart. And at the heart of it all, we have the servant, the friend, the one who lives in the shadows, the background, who does all the work but receives none of the credit. Forget what you know. It will all go to shit by the end of this story. Highly recommended. Read it for FREE here: http://www.tor.com/stories/2014/06/li...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Felicia [Felicia's Ink(t)]

    "There is some debate over what Yeva Luchova actually looked like, whether her hair was burnished gold or lustrous black, whether her eyes were blue as sapphires or green as new grass. It is not the particulars of her beauty but the power of it that concerns us, and we need only know that Yeva was lovely from the moment of her birth. She was so beautiful, in fact, that the midwife attending her mother snatched up the wailing infant and locked herself in a linen closet, begging for just another mo "There is some debate over what Yeva Luchova actually looked like, whether her hair was burnished gold or lustrous black, whether her eyes were blue as sapphires or green as new grass. It is not the particulars of her beauty but the power of it that concerns us, and we need only know that Yeva was lovely from the moment of her birth. She was so beautiful, in fact, that the midwife attending her mother snatched up the wailing infant and locked herself in a linen closet, begging for just another moment to gaze upon Yeva’s face and refusing to relinquish the baby until the Duke called for an axe to break down the door. The Duke had the midwife whipped, but that didn’t stop several of Yeva’s nursemaids from trying to steal the child away. Finally, her father hired a blind old woman to care for his daughter, and there was peace in his home. Of course, that peace did not last, for Yeva only grew more beautiful as she aged." I loved this folk tale!! Leigh outdid herself again. This novella can be found here on Tor free to read. It is a real short story I know, that's why I reread it today because it was too long ago for me to write a good review. This little story may seem like just a cute story. But I see it as a wise lesson too. You can't force a woman into marriage without knowing what she wants. Your tries are useless if they come from a heart full of greed. And it doesn't matter if you're the one 'giving' her away or wanting her. Greed is not how you get things - see the irony in that!! This story shows us why greed doesn't work. And that the tools [living or not] are not yours to always fully rely on without question. One day it will run free, question you or break. These are the lessons Leigh left us, I believe. I won't tell anything else about this cute - yes, it still remains a cute story - short story, because I would spoil it. And I don't like to spoil a complete book, but spoiling a 32-page story is even worse I think!! |Blog|Twitter|Facebook|Bloglovin’|Instagram|Tumblr|Google+|Pinterest|Niume|

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katerina Kondrenko

    8 out of 10 Ревью в моем блоге/This review on my blog Living A Thousand Lives (please use Chrome/Yandex browser or Android/IOS to see the page; otherwise, spoiler-tags I use to make my post compact may not work) This fairytale is about a super-beautiful girl and a commoner with power over river. You're up mission-impossible-like tasks, smart tricks and an unexpected ending. Quote-Core: "Remember that to use a thing is not to own it. The Grishaverse (Вселенная Гриши): The Grisha (Гриша): — The D 8 out of 10 Ревью в моем блоге/This review on my blog Living A Thousand Lives (please use Chrome/Yandex browser or Android/IOS to see the page; otherwise, spoiler-tags I use to make my post compact may not work) This fairytale is about a super-beautiful girl and a commoner with power over river. You're up mission-impossible-like tasks, smart tricks and an unexpected ending. Quote-Core: "Remember that to use a thing is not to own it. The Grishaverse (Вселенная Гриши): The Grisha (Гриша): — The Demon in the Wood (Демон в лесу) #0.1/3 — The Witch of Duva (Ведьма Дувы) #0.5/3 — Shadow and Bone (Тень и Кость ) #1/3 — The Tailor (Портниха) #1.5/3 — Siege and Storm (Осада и Штурм) #2/3 — The Too-Clever Fox (Уж очень умный лис) #2.5/3 — Little Knife (Ножичек) #2.6/3 — Ruin and Rising (Крах и Восход) #3/3 Six of Crows (Шестерка Воронов): — Six of Crows (Шестерка воронов) #1/2 — Crooked Kingdom (Продажное царство) #2/2

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    1st read - August 2014 2nd read - June 2020 (listened to the free audiobook via Audible Stories https://stories.audible.com/) Little Knife is the third free short story that Leigh Bardugo has written for the Tor website (you can find it here) and it's just as good as the others. These stories don't feature characters from the Grisha series but are in fact Ravkan fairytales that would be told to young children by their parents. This is the story of a young girl who is so beautiful that everyone who 1st read - August 2014 2nd read - June 2020 (listened to the free audiobook via Audible Stories https://stories.audible.com/) Little Knife is the third free short story that Leigh Bardugo has written for the Tor website (you can find it here) and it's just as good as the others. These stories don't feature characters from the Grisha series but are in fact Ravkan fairytales that would be told to young children by their parents. This is the story of a young girl who is so beautiful that everyone who looks at her face falls madly in love with her. Even when she was a baby servants tried to steal her but now she is a teenager men are willing to fight to the death for the chance of winning her heart. I'm not going to say much more but the story has great themes and remind readers to be careful what they wish for! These little freebies are a great way of testing out the author's writing style and for fans of the series they just add even more depth to the world building in the main books. This is one of my favourite series and I can't recommend it highly enough but you can read the short stories (The Witch of Duva, The Too-Clever Fox and Little Knife) in any order whether you've read any of the full length novels or not.

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