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Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue (Benu Krimi)

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Die Fälle des Auguste C. Dupin Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue (The Murders in the Rue Morgue) war die erste von drei Kriminalgeschichten, die sich um die Figur des scharfsinnig ermittelnden Detektivs C. Auguste Dupin drehte. Diese erstmals im April 1841 in der Zeitschrift Graham's Magazine erschienene Detektivgeschichte war auch eine der ersten Kriminalgeschichten, die Die Fälle des Auguste C. Dupin »Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue« (The Murders in the Rue Morgue) war die erste von drei Kriminalgeschichten, die sich um die Figur des scharfsinnig ermittelnden Detektivs C. Auguste Dupin drehte. Diese erstmals im April 1841 in der Zeitschrift Graham's Magazine erschienene Detektivgeschichte war auch eine der ersten Kriminalgeschichten, die sich der Technik des »verschlossenen Raums« bediente. 1842 trat Dupin nochmals als Hauptfigur in der Kriminalerzählung »Das Geheimnis der Marie Rogêt« (The Mystery of Marie Rogêt) und schließlich 1844 in »Der entwendete Brief« (The Purloined Letter) auf. Der vorliegende Band gibt Poes drei berühmte Kriminalgeschichten um den Detektiv C. Auguste Dupin zusammen mit Poes kurzer Kriminalerzählung »Der Mann in der Menge« und seinem berühmten Gedicht »Der Rabe« in der Fassung der im Jahr 1922 von Theodor Etzel herausgegebenen Gesamtausgabe von Poes Erzählungen wieder.


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Die Fälle des Auguste C. Dupin Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue (The Murders in the Rue Morgue) war die erste von drei Kriminalgeschichten, die sich um die Figur des scharfsinnig ermittelnden Detektivs C. Auguste Dupin drehte. Diese erstmals im April 1841 in der Zeitschrift Graham's Magazine erschienene Detektivgeschichte war auch eine der ersten Kriminalgeschichten, die Die Fälle des Auguste C. Dupin »Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue« (The Murders in the Rue Morgue) war die erste von drei Kriminalgeschichten, die sich um die Figur des scharfsinnig ermittelnden Detektivs C. Auguste Dupin drehte. Diese erstmals im April 1841 in der Zeitschrift Graham's Magazine erschienene Detektivgeschichte war auch eine der ersten Kriminalgeschichten, die sich der Technik des »verschlossenen Raums« bediente. 1842 trat Dupin nochmals als Hauptfigur in der Kriminalerzählung »Das Geheimnis der Marie Rogêt« (The Mystery of Marie Rogêt) und schließlich 1844 in »Der entwendete Brief« (The Purloined Letter) auf. Der vorliegende Band gibt Poes drei berühmte Kriminalgeschichten um den Detektiv C. Auguste Dupin zusammen mit Poes kurzer Kriminalerzählung »Der Mann in der Menge« und seinem berühmten Gedicht »Der Rabe« in der Fassung der im Jahr 1922 von Theodor Etzel herausgegebenen Gesamtausgabe von Poes Erzählungen wieder.

30 review for Der Doppelmord in der Rue Morgue (Benu Krimi)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    In these first five stories about Poe's detective Auguste Dupin, he establishes many of the traditions or motifs we know from classic detective fiction. The eccentric but brilliant detective who solves the mystery merely by analysing the facts from his armchair, the mystery of how a murder was committed in a closed room, laying a false trail with false clues or "red herrings" for the reader to follow are just three of his original tropes, which are now so familiar that they are almost cliches. In these first five stories about Poe's detective Auguste Dupin, he establishes many of the traditions or motifs we know from classic detective fiction. The eccentric but brilliant detective who solves the mystery merely by analysing the facts from his armchair, the mystery of how a murder was committed in a closed room, laying a false trail with false clues or "red herrings" for the reader to follow are just three of his original tropes, which are now so familiar that they are almost cliches. On its publication, the first story, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, written in 1841, was highly praised for its inventiveness and new style of storytelling. A murder was committed on the fourth floor, the windows were closed from the inside, the chimney was too narrow for even a cat to get through, so how did the murderer escape? Such a clever conundrum had never before been presented to readers, implicitly inviting them to solve the mystery. Interestingly, Poe also establishes the convention of the "bumbling policeman", who is outwitted by Dupin, in this story. However Poe is sometimes criticised for the "twist" ending, which nobody could reasonably be expected to imagine. The ending of this story is a metaphor for brains against brawn. Perhaps Poe preferred to sacrifice the burgeoning rationality and method of analysis by his character Dupin, in order to make this metaphor more explicit, to make the reader aware that the intellect will always win over violence. The second story The Mystery of Marie Roget is a lesser story about Dupin. It is subtitled as its sequel, but is a bit of a disappointment after the brilliant conception of "The Murders in the Rue Morgue." Poe described his third story, The Purloined Letter, written in 1844, as "perhaps the best of my tales of ratiocination". In other words he was deliberately inventing a detective who used his powers of reasoning, who made conscious deliberate inferences in order to arrive at valid and rational conclusions. Dupin also recognises the importance of reading and the written word as evidence. By such descriptions in the narrative, the reader can follow Dupin's thoughts and reasoning and reach the conclusion for themselves. The answers to the mysteries are all there, but only a clever person can see them. The Gold Bug is yet another fascinating departure - an extremely readable story about the Secret Service involving the use of cyphers. In the fifth story Thou Art the Man red herrings abound, and the guilty party is perhaps the most least likely suspect. This is yet another literary device which is well used and popular in contemporary mystery fiction. It is worth remembering that the word "detective" did not exist at the time when Poe wrote The Murders in the Rue Morgue. He established the prototype of Dupin even before Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. It is easy to criticise a work in retrospect, but these early stories paved the way for a genre which is one of the most popular even today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adina

    2.5* A bit dry and moderately interesting. I definitely prefer Sherlock. Still, I gave it 3 stars for its historic value. It was probably the first detective story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review Edgar Allan Poe was a brilliant author, who died too early; I can only imagine what his macabre mind would have dreamed had he not perished. In The Murders in the Rue Morgue, a short story first published in 1841, Poe introduces a detective character, C. Auguste Dupin, who will show up in a few later stories. Many future writers, (Dame Agatha Christie, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) were influenced by this work in particular. It's quite possible the father of the detective story. A gory, Book Review Edgar Allan Poe was a brilliant author, who died too early; I can only imagine what his macabre mind would have dreamed had he not perished. In The Murders in the Rue Morgue, a short story first published in 1841, Poe introduces a detective character, C. Auguste Dupin, who will show up in a few later stories. Many future writers, (Dame Agatha Christie, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) were influenced by this work in particular. It's quite possible the father of the detective story. A gory, macabre story, it's not nearly as graphic as the things we read today, but it will still send the shivers up your spine. The most famous part of this work is how readers never suspect the culprit, given how well done the story is. It's a quick read, worth any mystery fan's attention... and a good sampling of the early genre for those interested in giving it a chance. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    Known as the first modern detective story, Edgar Allan Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue is a quick but fascinating read. What makes it interesting is that it is as much about Poe's detective, Dupin, and the workings of his mind as it is about the murders. Dupin's attitude (solving the gruesome murders as a form of amusement) both draws us in and repels us. I haven't read much from Poe for some time, but his work is definitely worth revisiting! 3.75 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I think this is one of the most brilliant detective stories ever written. Two ladies (mother and daughter L' Espanaye) are murdered in a house in Rue Morgue (Paris). But who did it? French Police arrests a suspect but did he really commit those heinous crimes? An independent gentleman named Dupin starts his investigations and draws stunning clues. Observation, facts and the combination of everything is his strength (he reminds me on a leaner version of Sherlock Holmes). Can he solve the horrible I think this is one of the most brilliant detective stories ever written. Two ladies (mother and daughter L' Espanaye) are murdered in a house in Rue Morgue (Paris). But who did it? French Police arrests a suspect but did he really commit those heinous crimes? An independent gentleman named Dupin starts his investigations and draws stunning clues. Observation, facts and the combination of everything is his strength (he reminds me on a leaner version of Sherlock Holmes). Can he solve the horrible mystery? What are his exact methods? The story is an absolute pageturner and intriguing from beginning to end. A perfect murder mystery. Absolutely recommended, a classic not to be missed!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This story has somewhat less emotional intensity than Poe's gothic horrors such as The Pit and the Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart. Yet that's perfectly appropriate, since this is a very different kind of story. In some ways it's the antithesis of the gothic, because here it is reason, not emotion, that's ascendant, that's the star of the show, so to speak. The trick for Poe is how to make it interesting nonetheless. He solves this conundrum by basically inventing the genre of detective This story has somewhat less emotional intensity than Poe's gothic horrors such as The Pit and the Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart. Yet that's perfectly appropriate, since this is a very different kind of story. In some ways it's the antithesis of the gothic, because here it is reason, not emotion, that's ascendant, that's the star of the show, so to speak. The trick for Poe is how to make it interesting nonetheless. He solves this conundrum by basically inventing the genre of detective fiction. Auguste Dupin is the progenitor of everyone from Sherlock Holmes to Hercule Poirot, using the same techniques of logic and deduction to solve a gruesome double murder. Dupin isn't as fully formed as Holmes or Poirot, and the story lacks some of the suspense-building elements of those later stories, but Poe continues to amaze me in this wonderful tale.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kaya

    It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic. I was pleasantly surprised with this short story. The writing style was engaging and plot was fast-paced. I was consumed by the story without forming any connection with the narrator nor other characters, which personalities were almost non-existent, truth be told. The main strength is the plot, of course, with it's suspense keeping the reader on his toes. This was the “It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.” I was pleasantly surprised with this short story. The writing style was engaging and plot was fast-paced. I was consumed by the story without forming any connection with the narrator nor other characters, which personalities were almost non-existent, truth be told. The main strength is the plot, of course, with it's suspense keeping the reader on his toes. This was the story about a puzzling double murder of Madame L'Espanaye and her daughter in the Rue Morgue. Mr. Dupin solved the mystery merely by analyzing the facts from his armchair. The mystery contained inexplicable facts like how the murder was committed in a closed room. Mr. Dupin used his observation to solve a murder case that even the police considered a lost cause. A murder was committed on the fourth floor, with the windows closed from the inside and the chimney was too narrow for even a cat to get through. The murderer turned out to be someone who the reader would never have guessed. The question is how did the murderer escape? „The sight of blood turned its anger into frenzy and it jumped on the body of the girl.“ Mr Po was way ahead of his time. The descriptions of committed violence were graphic and detailed. He did an excellent job in building tension and leading reader from wrong to right way. The story kept me on my toes from first to last page. The writing style is dynamic and vivid, and that helped a lot to my overall impression. Description of the story is stimulating and bloody. There's a lot of suspense due to the lack of motive for the murders as well as the strange evidence and witness reports. You won't like the ending, I was a bit disappointed myself. I would like it more if there was some bigger factor of human interest story. „In this kind of investigation we should not ask the question ’what has happened’ but ’what has happened that has never happened before?’“ I wish there was more inner thoughts of Mr. Dupin. "Truth is not always in a well. In fact, as regards the more important knowledge, I do believe that she is invariably superficial. The depth lies in the valleys where we seek her, and not upon the mountain-tops where she is found." Beautiful.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    The Murders in the Rue Morgue The story is told through an anonymous narrator. The narrator meets Monsieur Dupin in a bookstore and ends up becoming friends. Monsieur Dupin comes from an important and wealthy family, but he has almost nothing. The narrator, a man of wealth, rents a deserted mansion. He and the new friend agree to live together for as long as the narrator stays in Paris. Monsieur Dupin is a very intelligent man with a great analytical talent, able to know what someone is thinking The Murders in the Rue Morgue The story is told through an anonymous narrator. The narrator meets Monsieur Dupin in a bookstore and ends up becoming friends. Monsieur Dupin comes from an important and wealthy family, but he has almost nothing. The narrator, a man of wealth, rents a deserted mansion. He and the new friend agree to live together for as long as the narrator stays in Paris. Monsieur Dupin is a very intelligent man with a great analytical talent, able to know what someone is thinking based on what happened to him during the day. One day as they walk the streets, they see in the newspaper a front page story about a double murder, mother and daughter, on Rue Morgue, a deserted Paris alley. The murders are violently vicious and for no apparent reason, since nothing was stolen, even though the house was totally overturned. French police have no clue about the killer, but they arrest a bank clerk who helped the victim take money home the afternoon of the murder. Dupin believes he can free the man, his acquaintance, by finding the real killer. With the permission of the police chief, he investigates the scene of the crime and reaches a conclusion. He places an ad in the newspaper claiming to have captured an orangutan and the owner should pick it up. A sailor, responding to the announcement goes to the house where they are .. Monsieur Dupin says he knows the truth, that the orangutan is the murderer and that the man must tell this to the police so that an innocent man is released. What happened was the following: The sailor on his way home found the monkey in the bathroom with a tube of cream and a shaver, imitating something he always saw. The owner, seeing that, took his whip to put it back in his cage. Frightened, the monkey fled to Morgue Street, drawn by the lights coming from Madame L'Espanaye's room. He climbed the window and grabbed the woman in the attempt to shave. His daughter, seeing the scene, fainted. In desperation, the woman started screaming, which caused the monkey to become violent and cut its throat. Then he strangled his daughter. Realizing what he had done and afraid of being beaten by his owner, he began to turn the house by breaking things. Finally he hid Mademoiselle L'Esapanaye's body in the chimney and threw Madame's body out the window, running away soon after. That is, there was never a motive or a miraculous plan for crime, only an orangutan in fear of its owner. The mystery of Marie Rogêt The Mystery of Marie Roget, a book originally written in 1842 by the American writer Edgar Allan Poe (famous for his mystery tales), tells the story of the disappearance of Marie Cecilia Rogers. Marie was 22 years old and the daughter of a widowed lady who owns a pension in Paris. Marie started working at a local perfumery, and was famous in the city for being very nice to everyone and also for her beauty. Everyone in the town is surprised that the young woman disappears for a week, and comes back shortly afterwards, with the excuse that an aunt who lived a short distance away would visit. However, Marie disappears again after months. And this time forever: Marie's body is found floating in the river giving clear indications that a brutal murder had been committed there. There begins an investigation by Detective Dupin to unravel the mystery. Dupin did his investigations based on the local facts and newspapers of the city, without access to the body of the victim. At first the investigations fell on Marie's fiancé, but a few days later he committed suicide in a brush near the river where the girl's body was found. After the suspicions of several people, Dupin comes to the conclusion that whoever killed Marie Rogers was his lover, a sailor. However, this was only a guess, as Allan Poe ends the book leaving the reader disappointed, without reaching a definitive conclusion and speaking confused things. This book is based on a true episode, happened in century XIX, and that it awoke enormous commotion and repercussion.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Janete

    Audiobook in Portuguese. During my life, I tried several times to read this short story, but I never ended it. This time, I could listen to the audiobook until the end and I loved it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa J.

    I love mysteries, I really do, so of course I had to read this one. I mean, written by no other author than Poe and it is said Dupin was part of the inspiration of this man here: How could I resist, then? Part of why I love mysteries so much is because I get to have a role in the story. Obviously I cannot interfere in what the characters are doing, but I can be invested in what they're doing - by trying to find the answers, I mean. Unfortunately for this story, I never really could play that part. I love mysteries, I really do, so of course I had to read this one. I mean, written by no other author than Poe and it is said Dupin was part of the inspiration of this man here: How could I resist, then? Part of why I love mysteries so much is because I get to have a role in the story. Obviously I cannot interfere in what the characters are doing, but I can be invested in what they're doing - by trying to find the answers, I mean. Unfortunately for this story, I never really could play that part. Why? Because we are never given clues or suspects. I want to think this is because it's a short story, but there are more than 50 Sherlock Holmes short stories, and even in the predictable ones you get the chance of solving the mystery before the answer is given. The problem was that when Dupin appeared in the scene, he started saying all he thought happened, which in fact was what really happened, and so I never could wonder who was the murderer. But of course, it was a delight to meet Dupin. You can certainly see the similarities between himself and Holmes. Again, I prefer the latter one. Dupin was still great, though. Anyway, knowing Poe's stories, I can say this is not one of his best, yet it is nonetheless worth reading. Now, can we bless Conan Doyle for bringing life to Holmes even though he hated it? (Sorry for that)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    This is one of the original detective stories, eventually inspiring the likes of Sherlock Holmes. It was not a bad story, and the murderer in the end was one that I didn't see coming however the beginning, the prologue, was way too long. It was describing the way one might analyse a person but it took like 11 pages to do it! Once it got into the actual story, it was quicker to get through, although the sentence structure and certain words are not like what we use today and that made it slightly This is one of the original detective stories, eventually inspiring the likes of Sherlock Holmes. It was not a bad story, and the murderer in the end was one that I didn't see coming however the beginning, the prologue, was way too long. It was describing the way one might analyse a person but it took like 11 pages to do it! Once it got into the actual story, it was quicker to get through, although the sentence structure and certain words are not like what we use today and that made it slightly hard to fully understand everything that was happening.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cláudia

    Very good, and easily read. A true classic, this little mystery is considered to be the first ever 'detective story', and you can definitely tell. It's very analytical, with the story element lacking a bit in substance, instead consisting mostly of a torrent of theories and guesses. It's the author trying something new and different, something that was later perfected by Arthur Conan Doyle, by Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, and others from the 20s - the 'Golden Age' of crime fiction -, all the Very good, and easily read. A true classic, this little mystery is considered to be the first ever 'detective story', and you can definitely tell. It's very analytical, with the story element lacking a bit in substance, instead consisting mostly of a torrent of theories and guesses. It's the author trying something new and different, something that was later perfected by Arthur Conan Doyle, by Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, and others from the 20s - the 'Golden Age' of crime fiction -, all the way to the hardboiled detective stories, predominant between the 30s and the 50s, and to the contemporary crime/thriller/'whodunit' novels we have today. If you enjoy mysteries, not only does this have more than enough merit by itself, it also is a great read since it's at the base of all crime stories that came since.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    Poe's story has one of the first "detective" in literature. M. Dupin looks at the situation, follows the clues, and comes up with the true murderer. Today, detectives supported their suppositions with fingerprints, DNA, and complicated lab procedures. It was interesting to see the murder solved by deduction.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    We can all thank Edgar Allen Poe for publishing the granddaddy of mysteries... Poe and Agatha Christie instilled a love for mysteries that continues to this day.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    2nd read, 6/2017. Superb. Poe gives birth to the detective story. -------- This being only the fourth or fifth of Poe I've read, I confess I found it a difficult piece. I can't see modern readers liking this, only because summary abounds and dialogue commands. Much of the beginning went over my head, but I got the point- this detective talks and thinks like a genius. I loved the writing. Poe claims fame even in elementary schools and I start to learn why. His skills excel. The man had a unique and 2nd read, 6/2017. Superb. Poe gives birth to the detective story. -------- This being only the fourth or fifth of Poe I've read, I confess I found it a difficult piece. I can't see modern readers liking this, only because summary abounds and dialogue commands. Much of the beginning went over my head, but I got the point- this detective talks and thinks like a genius. I loved the writing. Poe claims fame even in elementary schools and I start to learn why. His skills excel. The man had a unique and powerful brain. Two mutilated bodies lay in a room. Witnesses abound but police can't understand the situation. This genius detective figures it out. The story reads like a math proof, which I found pleasurable. I can't say many modern readers would agree. I've heard from editors readers today understand on an average of a third grade reading level and summary loses them. They want to see a movie in a book. However, the story brought me peace and transferred my mind elsewhere, but it doesn't read like a movie.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Connie G

    C. Auguste Dupin solves a double murder in Poe's first detective story. An unnamed narrator is amazed by Dupin's analytic skills (similar to the later Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot). The story is far-fetched, but entertaining. I would never have guessed the identity of the shrill-voiced perpetrator.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Once you know who done it (that is, upon re-reading after 40+ years), I regretfully find that the story falls flat and Dupin is a smug fella. Ook! Once you know who done it (that is, upon re-reading after 40+ years), I regretfully find that the story falls flat – and Dupin is a smug fella. Ook!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sue K H

    3.5 stars I loved the beginning of this book with the argument of how draughts (checkers) requires more reflective intellect than chess. I adore this type of out of the box thinking and Poe makes a good case! I also enjoyed the murder story all the way up to when it was solved. I didn't care for the ending otherwise this would have been 4 stars for me. It's definitely worth a read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Not something I would recommend for casual mystery readers, but if you're a serious fan of the genre, you should enjoy one of the first murder mysteries written. The plot might be a bit cliche, but this is absolutely a fine example of one of the first stories of its genre and it's also a short story, so it makes for a fun read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    "We existed within ourselves alone."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Simon Taylor

    The much-hyped, greatly-revered The Murders in the Rue Morgue were a bitter disappointment. The first and titular of the five short stories began with a long discussion of everything you never wanted to know about chess, simply to allow Poe to make clear the difference between observing and analysing. The case is outlined in the past tense, and solved immediately. There is no investigation, and none of the characters referred to actually appear. In fact, the long, repetitive and frankly The much-hyped, greatly-revered “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” were a bitter disappointment. The first and titular of the five short stories began with a long discussion of everything you never wanted to know about chess, simply to allow Poe to make clear the difference between observing and analysing. The case is outlined in the past tense, and solved immediately. There is no investigation, and none of the characters referred to actually appear. In fact, the long, repetitive and frankly monotonous character summaries are all but useless when it comes to the solution, which is bad play on Poe’s part and humiliating to the modern writer. His next story begins with a spiel on calculus before using a similar style to recount the case. Poe’s writing style is difficult to follow. He censors names, places and dates for no real reason, and in the second story is at great pains to explain the fiction is based on a true story. Thus, he jumps in and out of character, telling the tale in first-person as the detective’s friend, and as an omniponent narrator, and seems confused about his role in the whole escapade. Long newspaper “clippings” are written in the same flowery prose, or staccato; annotations pop up to explain the parallels to real cases to the reader akin to watching a DVD commentary while watching the feature film; and the author tells the reader that he declines to pass on information because he feels like it. That being said, one must recognise and praise Poe for inventing the gengre of detective fiction and a great deal of literary devices – locked room murder, ‘detective and friend’ narration, and more. Having the first ever murder mystery on your shelf is a coup. Reading it, however, is more like a punishment.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jonnie

    He impaired his vision by holding the object too close. He might see, perhaps, one or two points with unusual clearness, but in so doing he, necessarily, lost sight of the matter as a whole. Thus there is such a thing as being too profound." The story opens with two ways of solving a problem. There's the chess player, who looks at all the pieces on the board and decides what to do next. Then there's the whist player, whose objective is to deduce what cards the other players are holding through He impaired his vision by holding the object too close. He might see, perhaps, one or two points with unusual clearness, but in so doing he, necessarily, lost sight of the matter as a whole. Thus there is such a thing as being too profound." The story opens with two ways of solving a problem. There's the chess player, who looks at all the pieces on the board and decides what to do next. Then there's the whist player, whose objective is to deduce what cards the other players are holding through observation. It was at this point that I realized how incredibly intelligent the story was going to be. Poe's first work of detective fiction is the story of a baffling double murder of Madame L'Espanaye and her daughter in the Rue Morgue (Morgue street, so fitting right?). Dupin, a Parisian gentlemen and his unnamed friend, who is also the narrator of the story, offer their services to "G--", prefect of police, in assisting the murders which are deemed unsolvable. By using a whist-player-style analytical approach, Dupin begins to unravel the crime in a way that's pure genius. Another perfect read by Edgar Allan Poe.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chaunceton Bird

    One thing's for sure, I did not see that coming.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Em*bedded-in-books*

    Perhaps after reading complete Sherlock Holmes more than twice in childhood , and being exposed to crisper thrillers later on, found this one very insipid and Dupin didn't impress much, perhaps because I don't like gas bag detectives.. can just tolerate Poirot, but not Holmes. The ending was not upto my expectations too. Have tried and failed at Poe horrors, and Poe murder mystery seems the same. So adieu, Poe.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    I can't think of anything written by Edgar Allan Poe that I didn't love.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    Actual rating is 3.5 stars. This is basically your locked room murder mystery and is considered the first modern detective story. After reading this short story, one can easily see the influence on authors like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle or Agatha Christie. I was pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed this short story. I am not the biggest fan of short stories as I would like to connect with the characters and that is difficult in a limited amount of time. This story isn't about the connection to the Actual rating is 3.5 stars. This is basically your locked room murder mystery and is considered the first modern detective story. After reading this short story, one can easily see the influence on authors like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle or Agatha Christie. I was pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed this short story. I am not the biggest fan of short stories as I would like to connect with the characters and that is difficult in a limited amount of time. This story isn't about the connection to the characters. It is about the mystery and how Dupin solves the mystery with his keen observation of the murder scene. As I said this is considered to be the first detective story and one can see the tropes that will used by detective stories for the rest of time. There is the locked room with the unexplained mystery, the smart and observant detective that explains the mystery to his companion, and the trap to capture the protagonist. It was really enjoyable to read the origins of these tropes. And the creepy nature of the crime just added to the atmosphere. I have only one other experience with reading Poe and that was way back in high school. I did not enjoy him way back then (I probably didn't get the symbolism and I wasn't really a reader at the time). After reading this short story I believe I will check out more of his stories and see why he is considered one of the greats.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    Incredible. Astounding. Phenomenal.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    I had to read this one for uni and I really enjoyed it! I had to fight the long paragraphs, yes. But I liked the criminalistic elements in this one! The reveal was exciting and I liked the characters!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Hmm. I pretty much thought this one was stupid. The pretentiousness of the language actually made me laugh a few times and while I realize the historical significance of the work itself, it still failed for me on just about every level.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Arthur Conan Doyle repeatedly cited Poe as a creative inspiration in his writing - particularly Poe's detective stories which are widely considered to be the first ever detective stories (Wilkie Collins is also attributed this honor with his book The Moonstone, but that was published several years later). Though I had read a few of Poe's short stories for school while growing up, I had not read his detective stories and was surprised to think of him as writing such stories as I had always Arthur Conan Doyle repeatedly cited Poe as a creative inspiration in his writing - particularly Poe's detective stories which are widely considered to be the first ever detective stories (Wilkie Collins is also attributed this honor with his book The Moonstone, but that was published several years later). Though I had read a few of Poe's short stories for school while growing up, I had not read his detective stories and was surprised to think of him as writing such stories as I had always consigned him to the realms of the fantastical and the macabre. This story is the first of his 3 detective stories featuring his amateur detective Monsieur Auguste Dupin. The story is a decidedly more gruesome sort of murder mystery than Doyle wrote as it is of course Poe. I was surprised however by the logical turns in which he wrote and just how many parallels there are between Doyle's characters and Poe's. Though Sherlock Holmes ridicules Dupin in one of his stories, Dupin, like Holmes, is solitary, taciturn and given to moodiness. Like Holmes, the stories are told from a narrator who lives with Dupin and whose thoughts Dupin enjoys predicting/reading to the astonishment of the narrator. There is even a quote that smacks of a very well known Holmes quote which is: "Now brought to this conclusion in so unequivocal a manner as we are, it is not our part, as reasoners, to reject it on account of apparent impossibilities. It is only for us to prove that these apparent 'impossibilities' are, in reality, not such." This later came out of the mouth of Sherlock Holmes (much more cleverly phrased) as: "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." - The Sign of Four. As a study then of Poe's influence on the work of Arthur Conan Doyle, this mystery is fascinating. On its own however, it is easy to see why it is not as well known as Doyle's work as Poe has a tendency to become overly verbose when describing his ideas of analysis. He takes fully 2 pages to basically say that he feels those who can analyze well tend to be imaginative and ingenious, but not necessarily vice versa (a simple syllogism of all A are B, but not all B are A). The story aside from the excessive narration however is interesting and provides amusement in some unusual views due to lack of familiarity with other regions. I will not say more as it would spoil the ending. Overall an interesting read, but more so when considered with Doyle's writings.

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