Hot Best Seller

Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Availability: Ready to download

For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way. Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitive For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way. Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds--Buddhism and Western psychotherapy--Epstein shows how "the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego's need to do with our inherent capacity to be." He encourages us to relax the ever-vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control. Drawing on events in his own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces  Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a more peaceful and spiritually satisfying life. About The Author: Mark Epstein, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice and the author of Thoughts Without a Thinker . He is a contributing editor to Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and clinical assistant professor of psychology at New York University. He lives in New York City.


Compare

For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way. Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitive For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way. Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds--Buddhism and Western psychotherapy--Epstein shows how "the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego's need to do with our inherent capacity to be." He encourages us to relax the ever-vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control. Drawing on events in his own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces  Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a more peaceful and spiritually satisfying life. About The Author: Mark Epstein, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice and the author of Thoughts Without a Thinker . He is a contributing editor to Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and clinical assistant professor of psychology at New York University. He lives in New York City.

30 review for Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Harris

    It's not an exaggeration to say this book changed my life. It got me to consider meditation, something I'd always considered uniquely odious, but now believe has made me 10% happier. Also, I've become friends with Mark, and he's a gem.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    This book was not what I was expecting it to be. Dan Harris, of Good Morning America, said this book literally changed his life. While I didn't find it life changing in any way, nor what I was looking for - a book about how to quiet the mind in this crazy world we are living in and live with less stress - it was a good book about incorporating mindfulness into psychotherapy...if one is interested in that. :) There are far better books out there on mindfulness and meditation, in my opinion.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bell

    “If we are not our thoughts, then what are we?” Dr. Epstein explores the productiveness of coming to terms with ourselves and our defenses/pain through psychotherapy and/or through Buddhist meditation practice. He goes into the ways both practices complement each other and how being stuck in one method can lead to a breakthrough in the other. He also mentions several types of meditation – from sitting still and staring at a blank wall to sexual meditations, indicating that orgasms [in respectfu “If we are not our thoughts, then what are we?” Dr. Epstein explores the productiveness of coming to terms with ourselves and our defenses/pain through psychotherapy and/or through Buddhist meditation practice. He goes into the ways both practices complement each other and how being stuck in one method can lead to a breakthrough in the other. He also mentions several types of meditation – from sitting still and staring at a blank wall to sexual meditations, indicating that orgasms [in respectful relationships] are both liberating, spiritual and one of the least respected ways we have of letting go of our egos and the incessant thoughts that can plague our observation of ourselves. By reading this book, I now realize that my problem with “The Secret” is that it speaks of the tip of the iceberg and its end result. In other words, thinking good thoughts will therefore bring good results. I whole-heartedly agree with this, but what’s missing in this thought or theory as it was presented is that it lacks the crucial middle part of cultivating self-awareness. Self-cultivation is what brings into account why we think such negative thoughts in the first place-thoughts that block our access to creativity and growth. For most people, “The Secret” is a good start, but there’s a lot we don’t pay attention to in our everyday lives. Epstein presents a few ways to pay attention. “Going to Pieces” goes a step further than thought processes and speaks of the benefit of quieting or stilling the mind, as is often done when meditating, going to sleep, or in having orgasms. All are activities where thinking too much can impede our enjoyment so we have to become vulnerable to the process and “let go.” I enjoyed reading Epstein’s co-creative East-West ideas so much that I almost ran out of post-its. I ended up cutting my regular post-its into 1/3rds and 1/4ths just so they would last me longer and I wouldn’t have to run out to the store. Hopefully, my copy wasn’t too outdated from his more recent edition. I learned a lot about Tibetan Buddhism that I never knew even though I dabbled in it for a few years. I predominantly studied Chinese Zen so a lot of the content was new for me. I don’t know how to rate this yet. I have another of his books ready to be read. I’ll hold off for a while so that I can absorb this book a little more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Good grief. This was the book I needed to read. If nothing else, it's given me a little bit of peace with the whole meditation process--this is the first book that has mentioned how difficult it can be to finally face all the mental chatter. I've been meditating daily for about a month and a half, and in some ways I feel better...but let's just say that taming my mind (and dealing with the emotions that have surfaced) has proven to be difficult, yikes. But I really love the main message of this Good grief. This was the book I needed to read. If nothing else, it's given me a little bit of peace with the whole meditation process--this is the first book that has mentioned how difficult it can be to finally face all the mental chatter. I've been meditating daily for about a month and a half, and in some ways I feel better...but let's just say that taming my mind (and dealing with the emotions that have surfaced) has proven to be difficult, yikes. But I really love the main message of this book which is to just feel what you feel. Don't analyze and don't attach meaning. The goal is to accept the feelings when they come and then watch them move on through. You don't have to be afraid, since "emotions, no matter how powerful, are not overwhelming if given room to breathe." I don't know, the book is just comforting, plain and simple. Epstein has such a straightforward, relatable, and nonjudgmental attitude. I really enjoyed reading this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    This book was PROFOUNDLY insightful to me. It is a case-by-case look at how a Buddhist perspective can aid in psychological healing. It's been a while, but I did read it twice. I'd have to look at my notes in the margins to give a better, more in depth review of this book. However, I can offer some clue by telling you what I got most out of this book and what I will ultimately take from it. Dr. Epstein did a marvelous job of putting Buddhist principles and concepts in context, making the religio This book was PROFOUNDLY insightful to me. It is a case-by-case look at how a Buddhist perspective can aid in psychological healing. It's been a while, but I did read it twice. I'd have to look at my notes in the margins to give a better, more in depth review of this book. However, I can offer some clue by telling you what I got most out of this book and what I will ultimately take from it. Dr. Epstein did a marvelous job of putting Buddhist principles and concepts in context, making the religion far less abstract, by citing specific situations where specific principles were able to change a person's attitude. For example, the first time I read this book I was experiencing something of a depression, which a person always fights against because depression is "bad". Dr. Epstein helped to illustrate how Buddhist teachings can aid us in the ebb and flow of our emotions by realizing that we don't need to judge feelings that way; we should merely let them flow through us and take whatever positivity and learning we are able from all experiences. The Buddhist emptiness concept, which was once so elusive and abstract for me, was illustrated brilliantly in this book. Emptiness and letting go of the ego allow experiences to pass through our lives unjudged, and thus we learn rather than fight and fear.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Read this after reading Dan Harris' "10% Happier" and while I do think there is a lot of good stuff in Mark Epstein's book, reading it right after Harris's may have been overkill. For one, "10% Happier" is written in a much more accessible style. Epstein's book is very much a psychology book and a Buddhist book, and if you don't have a good grounding in both, you may get a little lost or lose interest. Plus, a lot of the same ideas are hit upon, but Mark describes them a little more abstractly. Read this after reading Dan Harris' "10% Happier" and while I do think there is a lot of good stuff in Mark Epstein's book, reading it right after Harris's may have been overkill. For one, "10% Happier" is written in a much more accessible style. Epstein's book is very much a psychology book and a Buddhist book, and if you don't have a good grounding in both, you may get a little lost or lose interest. Plus, a lot of the same ideas are hit upon, but Mark describes them a little more abstractly. A little more practical advice would have been nice, but the book is what it is, and overall I did enjoy it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    Good concepts. I'm no longer that impressed by books on Buddhism written by well-off,white, abled-bodied, males.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    My favorite part of this book came before page 1. In the introduction, Dr. Epstein cites a Buddhist story of a university professor who goes to a Zen master eager to learn. The master offers him tea and then pours the tea into the cup until it overflows, and when the professor complains, the Zen master continues to pour and explains, "A mind that is already full cannot take in anything new." The snippits of Zen tradition, Buddhist koans, and other pieces of Eastern philosophy that make their way My favorite part of this book came before page 1. In the introduction, Dr. Epstein cites a Buddhist story of a university professor who goes to a Zen master eager to learn. The master offers him tea and then pours the tea into the cup until it overflows, and when the professor complains, the Zen master continues to pour and explains, "A mind that is already full cannot take in anything new." The snippits of Zen tradition, Buddhist koans, and other pieces of Eastern philosophy that make their way into this slim volume stand on their own and sparked a desire in me to learn more about Buddhism, but the attempts to integrate his meditative practice with his psychological practice often verged on trite, like he wanted his patients' stories to be as significant as the parables of monks on mountaintops. And when they weren't (how could they be?) he padded them with unnecessary interpretation that, for the most part, felt condescending to the reader. I felt like an eighth grade English teacher saddled with grading 50 two-page essays on "What Religion Means to Me," complete with its requisite Real World Examples and all. Snarky comments aside, I can't wholly dismiss a book that makes me want to learn more about something. So in accord with Epstein's teachings I'd suggest you read it, and then let it go.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nikmaack

    Something is wrong with this book. While there are the occasional insights, the author comes across as too worshipful of others & not respectful of himself. There are odd moments where he defers to the wisdom of others at times when it's not at all necessary. The book is very dry, cerebral, detached. That seems to be something Buddhists strive for and it makes me want to punch them. "I don't have feelings, I merely observe them. They don't control me." Don't feel this! POW! Something about this ob Something is wrong with this book. While there are the occasional insights, the author comes across as too worshipful of others & not respectful of himself. There are odd moments where he defers to the wisdom of others at times when it's not at all necessary. The book is very dry, cerebral, detached. That seems to be something Buddhists strive for and it makes me want to punch them. "I don't have feelings, I merely observe them. They don't control me." Don't feel this! POW! Something about this observing detachment is very depressing. Not to mention false. Almost Vulcan. Epstein definitely lives in his head. The book reveals some of his struggles, but there's never a sense that he explores his real problems. An interesting book, but I wouldn't recommend it to others.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    This review can also be found on my blog! My mom got this book for me a very long time ago because she thought it would be helpful for me since I’m planning on being in a helping profession. I don’t know if I want to do psychotherapy, but there are still methods you can piece out while working with clients. So, I had a very rough end of February. Lots of stress. I decided to pick it up and read it to see if it could bring me any kind of peace. I agree with the heard of Epstein’s message. To truly h This review can also be found on my blog! My mom got this book for me a very long time ago because she thought it would be helpful for me since I’m planning on being in a helping profession. I don’t know if I want to do psychotherapy, but there are still methods you can piece out while working with clients. So, I had a very rough end of February. Lots of stress. I decided to pick it up and read it to see if it could bring me any kind of peace. I agree with the heard of Epstein’s message. To truly heal from trauma or stress or whatever has gone on in your life that has left a mark on your mind, you have to face it. You have to look at it, acknowledge it, and learn that it is a part of you. I definitely think that’s how you have to do it and there are various ways to do that. It’s a very individualized process. As a social worker, we operate on the strength’s perspective. At my school, the entire program is based on that, so I’m very familiar with it. But, the strength’s perspective is focusing on the strengths that the person has. Acknowledge the deficits and what they might want to build on, but do it in a way that highlights the resources, internal or external, that they have. It’s very positive because positivity is the best way to empower someone. So, I know that I could easily work this into time with people I see because it operates around that same principle. You find something that is a strength and find a way to use it to help them work through the reason they’re there. Really, it’s a lot like solution-focused brief therapy, which is a therapy that focuses on solutions rather than problems and resource building that keep being built upon. (I just wrote a 10 page paper on this therapy so I’m very familiar.) However, I don’t really agree with a lot of Epstein’s conclusions. His therapy is very Freudian based. Now, don’t get me wrong, I appreciate Freud and the current interpretations of his work in psychodynamic theories. I agree that childhood is important and that it severely impacts people. However, he’s just so Freudian at times. It’s just frustrating because that’s not my theoretical model of the world. And, it’s Freud coupled with Buddhism. I like Buddhism and agree with lots of it, but, again, I don’t love it all. So, it just really was frustrating since I’d be totally with Epstein on stuff while I was reading, then he’d say something and I was lost. It was a damn shame for me as a reader. Totally a good book, but not one I’d go and tell everyone to read to help them work through things. For that, I’d go with my beloved Pema Chodron.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    * * Although small in size, Epstein's book presents quite a powerful synthesis of Buddhism and psychotherapy. Amazingly, he brings clarity to the paradoxical concepts of: feeling whole by accepting emptiness; finding happiness by letting go; feeling more at peace by tolerating uncertainty; and being able to go to pieces in order to avoid falling apart. I've already read this book twice, and I have no doubt that each successive read will uncover more gems hidden inside. The writing is superb, the * * Although small in size, Epstein's book presents quite a powerful synthesis of Buddhism and psychotherapy. Amazingly, he brings clarity to the paradoxical concepts of: feeling whole by accepting emptiness; finding happiness by letting go; feeling more at peace by tolerating uncertainty; and being able to go to pieces in order to avoid falling apart. I've already read this book twice, and I have no doubt that each successive read will uncover more gems hidden inside. The writing is superb, the presentation is compelling and lucid, and the way Epstein is able to distill and integrate key concepts of Buddhism and psychotherapy is beyond impressive. Epstein concludes the book by reflecting on how his being able to incorporate the Buddhist principles into his life has "allowed my awareness to be stronger than my neurosis" (p. 181). May we all achieve such a state. :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I struggled through this book. I read a book a while back where someone was a Buddhist and he talked about meditation. So I picked this up thinking I could learn something. But the author clearly has a vocabulary far different from mine. It was hard to follow along. If you are familiar with Buddhism (and are an MD) and have the vocab down, then this book might mean something to you and you might be able to extract some useful information. I, unfortunately, lacked the key to unlock this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    This is a reflection on how Buddhism and traditional psychotherapy conflict in some ways, but compliment each other as well. Epstein is not writing a self-help book, although there is much in the work that is edifying. Instead, he is weaving together strands of meditation and therapy to address issues of wholeness and emptiness. As a result, the work is somewhat dense --- although Epstein is very good at using stories to make his points, there's a lot of psychiatric theory and Buddhist history t This is a reflection on how Buddhism and traditional psychotherapy conflict in some ways, but compliment each other as well. Epstein is not writing a self-help book, although there is much in the work that is edifying. Instead, he is weaving together strands of meditation and therapy to address issues of wholeness and emptiness. As a result, the work is somewhat dense --- although Epstein is very good at using stories to make his points, there's a lot of psychiatric theory and Buddhist history to work through. I think it might take me a few reads (if I was inclined) to absorb it all. What worked best for me was Epstein's contrast between Western psychotherapy and Buddhism. In a traditional talk therapy setting, you might expect a diagnosis and then work on moving from a disintegrated self to an integrated self --- it's a Western model of find the problem and fix it. But Epstein argues that the unintegrated self may be important --- that who we are when we are lost (either in joy or sorrow) may be crucial. It's the Buddhist emphasis on acceptance of emptiness transformed to a psychological setting. I also found his explanation of mindfulness extremely well done; Epstein clearly showed how the "Four Foundations" (mindfulness of body, feelings, thoughts, and mind) build on each other. If you are interested in the topics raised and willing to do a bit of heavy reading, I think this is worth a look. Finally, an interesting connection: one of Epstein's influences, the psychoanalyst D. W. Winnicott, is the analyst profiled in sections of Alison Bechdel's Are You My Mother?.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    I enjoyed this book because it made me think critically about the concepts of self and happiness in modern-day psychology... at first. But then I realized-- a lot of the examples of where Buddhism succeeds and psychology fails are really just examples of either bad psychology or dated philosophy. I'm biased because I study psychology, but I really didn't find anything in the principles of Buddhism mentioned that were strikingly different from therapies I've learned about. Acceptance- & mindfulne I enjoyed this book because it made me think critically about the concepts of self and happiness in modern-day psychology... at first. But then I realized-- a lot of the examples of where Buddhism succeeds and psychology fails are really just examples of either bad psychology or dated philosophy. I'm biased because I study psychology, but I really didn't find anything in the principles of Buddhism mentioned that were strikingly different from therapies I've learned about. Acceptance- & mindfulness-based therapies do exist, so I just don't find this to be really ground-breaking or insightful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Orth

    Love, love, love this author! I am totally enamored with his marrying emotional health from a psychiatric perspective with Buddhist principles. Now I have to read everything he has written. Highly recommend.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Howard Mansfield

    Going to Pieces is very much in the self-help mode. Epstein mixes case histories from his psychiatry practice, his own stories, psychotherapy theories and Buddhist texts. His other books are more fluid and go deeper. But this is still an insightful guide to bringing Buddhists practices to bear on your daily life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    I wish I had a bigger understanding of some of the psychology terms and people he mentions in the book so I could get more out of it. Regardless of some small episodes of language that I didn't know what to do with, I still enjoyed the book and had much to be learned and appreciated. I'll have to read it again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I listened to this book because of "10% Happier." I don't think I got enough out of it to care, and I certainly didn't pay enough attention to be able to write a proper review. Maybe next time...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I read this book because Dan Harris had recommended it. Dan Harris wrote a much better book! I was pretty bored during this and did not find it helpful.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yassir Islam

    I first read this book when it came out, and just finished rereading it 15 years later. It is still an insightful and relevant book today as it was then. This is not a practitioners guide to Buddhism, nor is it an introduction. Epstein grapples with the concept of emptiness as examined through the lens of western contemporary psychotherapy and Buddhism. What follows is his attempt to inform the more limited concept of emptiness in the western tradition with its more expansive and freeing interpr I first read this book when it came out, and just finished rereading it 15 years later. It is still an insightful and relevant book today as it was then. This is not a practitioners guide to Buddhism, nor is it an introduction. Epstein grapples with the concept of emptiness as examined through the lens of western contemporary psychotherapy and Buddhism. What follows is his attempt to inform the more limited concept of emptiness in the western tradition with its more expansive and freeing interpretation from the eastern tradition. The self, he explains, is not something to be shored up to keep emptiness at bay. In fact, embracing emptiness in the Buddhist sense, paradoxically, is the path to liberation and knowing of true self.This books draws heavily from the discourse of western psychotherapy, and will probably be best appreciated by those looking for a more intellectual approach to the subject. More advanced readers or practitioners of Buddhism, also stand to benefit enormously from Epstein's enquiry into emptiness. He also uses examples from his own life to illustrate the points he is making. This may at time seem like an annoying scrutiny of the minutiae of one's one life, but it is only by doing so that we can begin to see that Buddhism is not about grand concepts, but about full awareness and attention, moment by moment, to our own lives. The trick is to get the analytical mind out of the way. What Epstein does is to bring his considerable analytical prowess to derive teachings from his personal and work experience and share them with us in a cogent, engaging manner.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Valentina Năstăşel

    "Like Freud’s friends, who shrunk back from the terrifying transitoriness of the flower’s bloom, and like Joe, we recoil from the revelation of our lover’s freedom. We insist on holding on, or we withdraw prematurely, rather than trusting in love’s ability to constantly reassert itself. Yet this is precisely what makes a relationship as much of a spiritual teaching as a classical meditation. Both confront us with our refusal to let go, with our expectations for how things are supposed to be. Bot "Like Freud’s friends, who shrunk back from the terrifying transitoriness of the flower’s bloom, and like Joe, we recoil from the revelation of our lover’s freedom. We insist on holding on, or we withdraw prematurely, rather than trusting in love’s ability to constantly reassert itself. Yet this is precisely what makes a relationship as much of a spiritual teaching as a classical meditation. Both confront us with our refusal to let go, with our expectations for how things are supposed to be. Both demand faith that we will survive our own worst impulses. Both reveal the essential unknowability of self and other while at the same time providing a means of revelling in it"

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve Woods

    This book was one of the few sources that put the idea that what was happening to me at a very difficult time was not the end but a beginning. How true that has turned out to be, very populist in its approach and style but accessible to anyone. It was from the starting point that was established at the time I read this book that the journey has progressed, in fits and starts maybe but it did lead to serious consideration of another way of living that is central to my being now. This book was a s This book was one of the few sources that put the idea that what was happening to me at a very difficult time was not the end but a beginning. How true that has turned out to be, very populist in its approach and style but accessible to anyone. It was from the starting point that was established at the time I read this book that the journey has progressed, in fits and starts maybe but it did lead to serious consideration of another way of living that is central to my being now. This book was a small brick inthe path that has led a long way and has a long way still to run.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mandi

    With Thoughts Without a Thinker I needed to break up the reading because the ideas were so intense. However, in Going to Pieces I would have preferred to have read it through in just a sitting or two. It is an easier read with easier concepts, so it would have been enjoyable to have really immersed myself into the material. It is a book to re-read several times, so next time I'll probably read it without the outside interruptions I had this time. Mark Epstein definitely didn’t disappoint and rea With Thoughts Without a Thinker I needed to break up the reading because the ideas were so intense. However, in Going to Pieces I would have preferred to have read it through in just a sitting or two. It is an easier read with easier concepts, so it would have been enjoyable to have really immersed myself into the material. It is a book to re-read several times, so next time I'll probably read it without the outside interruptions I had this time. Mark Epstein definitely didn’t disappoint and reading this book has only made me a greater fan.

  24. 5 out of 5

    MizzSandie

    One of the (few) books I gave up on. I just wasn't connecting with it. In spite of it connecting therapy and Buddhism, two very interesting and fascinating subjects. Maybe it was because I just didn't feel like it brought me any new insights, because it didn't move me, emotionally or mentally. And because I have a stack of other books waiting for me, so I chose not to waste any more time, but to just move on.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Renate Eveline

    Ok-ish. I was looking for a good perspective on buddhist psychology, but didn't find much insight here. Concerning the Buddhist part, Epstein just covers the basics as so many books do. Regarding the psychological part, a broader perspecive would have been nive, Epstein leans too much on Winnicot for my liking. It became harder and harder to finish this book, which looked so promising at first.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Not overly dense or overly simplistic this books walks a fine line of being insightful and accessible. Those looking for a scientific approach may be disappointed by the lack of studies or brain imaging references but if you are happy to learn from the wisdom and analytic skill of someone with years of experience in the contemplative fields of Buddhism and psychotherapy you are in for a treat.

  27. 4 out of 5

    eHawk

    I spent a lot of time identifying with what Epstein had to say here, and I think it's interesting to see how contemplative practices can offer insights and peace that can round out what we're looking for in therapy... it's a good amt of pulling the wool away and looking at how westerners have been socially indoctrinated.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    There are some gems in this book that make it worth reading, some 'aha' moments I could relate back to my own life, but I would have preferred a condensed version containing only these gems (by my definition). Is asking an author to write the book for me asking too much? :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    I first bought this book over 10 years ago and I re-read it every couple of years. It has gotten me through a lot of difficult times - I highly recommend.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is great to read again and again when dealing with tough stuff.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.