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The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book: Uncommon Recipes from the Celebrated Brooklyn Pie Shop

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From the proprietors of the renowned Brooklyn shop and cafe comes the ultimate pie-baking book for a new generation of bakers. Melissa and Emily Elsen, the twenty-something sisters who are proprietors of the wildly popular Brooklyn pie shop and cafe Four & Twenty Blackbirds, have put together a pie-baking book that's anything but humble. This stunning collection features m From the proprietors of the renowned Brooklyn shop and cafe comes the ultimate pie-baking book for a new generation of bakers. Melissa and Emily Elsen, the twenty-something sisters who are proprietors of the wildly popular Brooklyn pie shop and cafe Four & Twenty Blackbirds, have put together a pie-baking book that's anything but humble. This stunning collection features more than 60 delectable pie recipes organized by season, with unique and mouthwatering creations such as Salted Caramel Apple, Green Chili Chocolate, Black Currant Lemon Chiffon, and Salty Honey. There is also a detailed and informative techniques section. Lavishly designed, Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book contains 90 full-color photographs by Gentl & Hyers, two of the most sought-after food photographers working today. With its new and creative recipes, this may not be you mother's cookbook, but it's sure to be one that every baker from novice to pro will turn to again and again.


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From the proprietors of the renowned Brooklyn shop and cafe comes the ultimate pie-baking book for a new generation of bakers. Melissa and Emily Elsen, the twenty-something sisters who are proprietors of the wildly popular Brooklyn pie shop and cafe Four & Twenty Blackbirds, have put together a pie-baking book that's anything but humble. This stunning collection features m From the proprietors of the renowned Brooklyn shop and cafe comes the ultimate pie-baking book for a new generation of bakers. Melissa and Emily Elsen, the twenty-something sisters who are proprietors of the wildly popular Brooklyn pie shop and cafe Four & Twenty Blackbirds, have put together a pie-baking book that's anything but humble. This stunning collection features more than 60 delectable pie recipes organized by season, with unique and mouthwatering creations such as Salted Caramel Apple, Green Chili Chocolate, Black Currant Lemon Chiffon, and Salty Honey. There is also a detailed and informative techniques section. Lavishly designed, Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book contains 90 full-color photographs by Gentl & Hyers, two of the most sought-after food photographers working today. With its new and creative recipes, this may not be you mother's cookbook, but it's sure to be one that every baker from novice to pro will turn to again and again.

30 review for The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book: Uncommon Recipes from the Celebrated Brooklyn Pie Shop

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia

    For years, pie was one of those things I was intimidated by. Why? It’s a marquee holiday dessert, easy to get wrong (the crust!), and the whole process is fairly long and labor-intensive. I got over that fear thanks to my best friend’s aunt – she took a day and demystified pie for us two aspiring bakers in her large, sunny kitchen. These days, Thanksgiving isn’t complete if I haven’t made three pies. That said, I wasn’t in a hurry to branch out from the exact technique Aunt Laura taught us. UNTI For years, pie was one of those things I was intimidated by. Why? It’s a marquee holiday dessert, easy to get wrong (the crust!), and the whole process is fairly long and labor-intensive. I got over that fear thanks to my best friend’s aunt – she took a day and demystified pie for us two aspiring bakers in her large, sunny kitchen. These days, Thanksgiving isn’t complete if I haven’t made three pies. That said, I wasn’t in a hurry to branch out from the exact technique Aunt Laura taught us. UNTIL. I asked my local library to order a copy of The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book: Uncommon Recipes from the Celebrated Brooklyn Pie Shop. I borrowed it, but only peeked inside once before returning it. When I found out that authors Emily and Melissa Elsen would be at the Baltimore Book Fest this past fall, I made it my mission to go to their presentation. Which was awesome. I was an instant convert (the Bourbon Pear Crumble pie slices they passed around didn’t hurt). Armed with this cookbook and my newly-acquired tools of the trade (thanks to the holidays!), I feel like an adventurous baker. Long live pie! This cookbook is as advertised: it’s a collection of pie recipes from the pie shop that South Dakota-raised sisters Emily and Melissa Elsen own and run in Brooklyn, New York. If you’re like me, the mention of Brooklyn + _____ [insert some trendy thing here] makes you a little wary. I always wonder, “Will this be for real? Or did it just get this far because NYC is the center of the world (at least according to New Yorkers and half of the East Coast).” Luckily, this pie book has solid roots – decades of baking and food service run along the Elsen girls’ maternal line. Though they’re self-taught, Emily and Melissa’s recipes and methods are reliable (and delicious). The cookbook is arranged seasonally, by what ingredients are available when. The pie crust recipes are at the back, and notes on sourcing ingredients and techniques (including step-by-step photos) for crust construction are at the front. I skipped over a lot of those notes at first in favor of staring at the stunning photos of individual pies (really, it’s enough to make you want to lick the pages!). One of the best bits about seeing Emily and Melissa in person was their reiteration of suggestions in the book – the little things that make the baking process easier. Most helpful to me were mentions of which tools are hardiest (they’re fans of OXO) and necessary (I HAD to have a pastry scraper!), versus others that they could take or leave. It’s also confidence boosting to just see someone else make a crust in front of you. You end up thinking, “If they can do that in front of a crowd, on a time schedule, in warm-to-hot weather under a pavilion, I can definitely do it in my kitchen!” And I have. So far I’ve made their Bourbon Pear Crumble, Lemon Chess, Salted Caramel Apple, and Browned Butter Pumpkin pies. All of them ‘turned out’ beautifully, but the most popular were the lemon chess and pumpkin. The pumpkin survived a flight to Syracuse at Thanksgiving! I’ve never before felt so many envious eyes on me as when I carried it through the security line at Reagan National Airport. *grin* Best part of the cookbook: uhhh… everything? I adore it. I take it off the shelf often, and I think I will continue to do so. It’s dead useful for anyone interested in pie, and it’s ridiculously pretty. It also hasn’t steered me wrong yet – the recipes, if you follow them to the letter, are kind of ridiculously reliable. My OCD-prone baking soul is content. Worst part: again, I don’t have anything to say here. You can skip over the intro if you want, but the rest is readable and useful. In conclusion: if pie matters to you, get this book. Buy/borrow/whatever-you-have-to-do. It’s worth a perusal for the photos alone, but I’ve found it extremely practical and inspiring, as well. A+. Recommended for: pie bakers (from aspiring to experienced), those interested in local/seasonal food preparation, and anyone with an eye for attractive cookbook design.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Bradshaw

    This is a WOW book for me, and one that I just might have to purchase, since I want to make every pie in the book! So why "only" 4 stars? Mostly just to caution readers that this is probably not a pie book for beginners. Yes, there are detailed instructions given, but I found them just a bit overly fussy. (Seriously? Chilling the pie crust dough at three different steps of construction?) Experienced bakers will know where they can take shortcuts. Also, many of the recipes call for some rather es This is a WOW book for me, and one that I just might have to purchase, since I want to make every pie in the book! So why "only" 4 stars? Mostly just to caution readers that this is probably not a pie book for beginners. Yes, there are detailed instructions given, but I found them just a bit overly fussy. (Seriously? Chilling the pie crust dough at three different steps of construction?) Experienced bakers will know where they can take shortcuts. Also, many of the recipes call for some rather esoteric ingredients. Like Angostura bitters (used in almost every recipe), vanilla paste, rose water, and wild ginger. Again - experienced bakers will know what can be left out, and or substituted for. That said, if you are looking for something beyond the ordinary, this might be the book for you (or me!) The illustrations alone will give you ideas for lattice and other decorative crust treatments. I like the seasonal arrangement of the book, and the emphasis on high-quality, fresh ingredients. They also provide online sources for some of the more hard-to-find ingredients. I decided to test one of the recipes for Pi Day (March 14.) Had to use what I had on hand without shopping for ingredients. To my mind, that is the mark of a good cookbook - or maybe it says more about the cook - can I use the recipes for ideas without sticking to it exactly... So I foraged in my freezer and came up with a bag still left of last year's rhubarb crop. Too early here in Minnesota for fresh! I also had a bag of storebought rhubarb to add to that. Then I looked at the several rhubarb pie recipes in the book and settled on the Rhuby Razz Square Pie. Perfect! I had a half a bag of frozen raspberries to use up. Still not enough fruit for the recipe, so I added a bag of frozen blueberries. There was a Bluebarb Slab Pie recipe in the book, but that called for double quantities, so I stuck with the square pie recipe. I could have made it in a regular pie dish, but I liked the novelty of trying it in a square pan. I liked the addition of cider vinegar to the crust recipe. That might just become my new go-to crust recipe. For the filling, I did not have any arrowroot. Substituted some egg replacer (potato/tapioca starch). Nor did I have any Angostura bitters. I substituted a little lemon juice. It turned out beautifully and tasted delicious! My biggest problem was what to call it. Razzy Bluebarb Pie? Blueby Razz Pie? Rhuby Razzblue Pie? Book Description: Melissa and Emily Elsen, the twenty-something sisters who are proprietors of the wildly popular Brooklyn pie shop and cafe Four & Twenty Blackbirds, have put together a pie-baking book that's anything but humble. This stunning collection features more than 60 delectable pie recipes organized by season, with unique and mouthwatering creations such as Salted Caramel Apple, Green Chili Chocolate, Black Currant Lemon Chiffon, and Salty Honey. There is also a detailed and informative techniques section. Lavishly designed, FOUR & TWENTY BLACKBIRDS PIE BOOK contains 90 full-color photographs by Gentl & Hyers, two of the most sought-after food photographers working today.

  3. 4 out of 5

    ItsAboutTheBook

    Review can be read at It's About The Book I fell in love with this book before I bought it. I came across the recipe for Salty Honey pie on a food blog and had ordered the book before the pie was fully baked and out of the oven. I am a very adventurous eater and love the recipes that push the boundaries of what we currently consider the usual dessert flavors. Whereas you will see cinnamon spicing up a fruit pie, you’re also likely to encounter paprika and white pepper. Custards are flavored w Review can be read at It's About The Book I fell in love with this book before I bought it. I came across the recipe for Salty Honey pie on a food blog and had ordered the book before the pie was fully baked and out of the oven. I am a very adventurous eater and love the recipes that push the boundaries of what we currently consider the usual dessert flavors. Whereas you will see cinnamon spicing up a fruit pie, you’re also likely to encounter paprika and white pepper. Custards are flavored with chamomile and lavender. These are flavors that could be referred to as esoteric, consequently, if you’re looking for Snickers pie or a basic Banana Cream, this is not the book for you. The recipes themselves are arranged by season, starting with spring. Seasonal produce is highlighted. The summer section is a bonanza of variations on berry and orchard fruit pies. The fall section has seasonal favorites such as Apple and Pumpkin, albeit they’ve got their own spin. If you’re a beginning baker or cook I would advise you to approach this book with respect and maybe a touch of caution. Many of the recipes require multiple steps that alone are not at all daunting, but can combine to be a little overwhelming. Also, as many beginner cooks have relatively thin pantries, be aware the ingredient lists can be quite long and possibly not what you’d expect from a typical baking book. I would recommend you opt for the inclusion of Angostura bitters, or any other variety of cocktail bitters, when it’s listed, but that does require purchasing a bottle if it’s not something you’ve already got on hand. I am totally the kind of person with Angostura on hand. At all times. In the large bottle. Crust is kind of the great sticking point with pies. Pies are an appreciable amount of work and can be expensive depending on ingredients. No one wants to go through all that effort to have a crust that tastes plain and feels like cardboard. I, personally, wasn’t really enamored with the basic pastry crust recipes in this book. I tend to make the same pastry crust, over and over, and the Pastry Police have not shown up at my home. The animal cookie crumb crust however, was totally awesome. Use the crust that makes you happy, because you’re the one that gets to eat it. The descriptions of how to roll out dough, create a basic lattice, and prebaking were all well thought out and easily understandable for a cook at any level of experience. I would like to add the book itself is absolutely gorgeous. This is truly top notch food photography that showcased these pies beautifully.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ditchface

    Although the inspiration and flavour ideas in this book are great, the instructions are pretty poor. I’ve been a home baker 10+ years, but following their recipes just didn’t yield good results on multiple occasions. The Elsen sisters enthusiasm for pie is wonderful to read, but their instinct for baking perhaps left the recipes I tried lacking the kind of helpful tips and explanation that really make a difference to someone who didn’t grow up making pies. Last grievance: cups are an infuriating Although the inspiration and flavour ideas in this book are great, the instructions are pretty poor. I’ve been a home baker 10+ years, but following their recipes just didn’t yield good results on multiple occasions. The Elsen sisters enthusiasm for pie is wonderful to read, but their instinct for baking perhaps left the recipes I tried lacking the kind of helpful tips and explanation that really make a difference to someone who didn’t grow up making pies. Last grievance: cups are an infuriating form of measurement - fiddly, harder to clean up and imprecise. Proper baking books measurements come in grams or at the very least, ounces.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Recipes tried: basic pastry (good), regular rhubarb pie (very good), rhubarb raspberry square pie (good flavor, don't get the point of it being square. Too hard to serve.) Planning to make grapefruit custard pie eventually.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    At least one crust that I think I can do gluten-free. Must try the peach pie and rhubarb custard pie.

  7. 4 out of 5

    emily

    This book just gifted me not only my new favorite pie, but my family's new must-have Thanksgiving pie, and my ultimate favorite pie crust recipe. I've wanted this book for a couple of years and I'm so glad I finally have it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Garner

    I love to bake and I love a really great story, so this cookbook was perfect for me. The layout of the instructions and the amount of detail these two women put into the book are astonishing. If you aren't a baker and would like to be, I would start with this book solely for the guides and resources it provides. The only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is because these recipes are truly "unusual". There are maybe three recipes in there that I would actually consider making and the rest ar I love to bake and I love a really great story, so this cookbook was perfect for me. The layout of the instructions and the amount of detail these two women put into the book are astonishing. If you aren't a baker and would like to be, I would start with this book solely for the guides and resources it provides. The only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is because these recipes are truly "unusual". There are maybe three recipes in there that I would actually consider making and the rest are just pretty to look at. Other than that the book is great.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I thought I'd never say this, but this book has converted me into a pie crust lover! Even other family members who hate pie crust were converted with me. I checked it out from the library and after baking four pies, bought it for myself to keep!

  10. 4 out of 5

    benquick

    A pie crust that I couldn't mess up. Fantastic.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jodi Geever

    I love pie. I *love* pie. I wanted to have peach pie in lieu of wedding cake. Get it? Okay. But I am terrified of making crust. And many store bought crusts use lard, and my husband is a vegetarian. So I picked this book up because it was recommended for folks who enjoyed Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home, which I did. When I read the reviews (yes, before I read the book) numerous home bakers admitted to being afraid of constructing crust too, until they learned the technique divulged in this b I love pie. I *love* pie. I wanted to have peach pie in lieu of wedding cake. Get it? Okay. But I am terrified of making crust. And many store bought crusts use lard, and my husband is a vegetarian. So I picked this book up because it was recommended for folks who enjoyed Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home, which I did. When I read the reviews (yes, before I read the book) numerous home bakers admitted to being afraid of constructing crust too, until they learned the technique divulged in this book. So here we are. The recipes look genuinely unique--farmer's cheese pie, black bottom lemon pie... There are numerous butter based crusts, and cookie based crusts. I'm still scared but let's hope I'll be okay.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Madigan Mirza

    Not for the neophyte pie-baker, this collection of upscale desserts is arranged seasonally, as the authors recommend cooking with fresh, local, in-season ingredients. Dripping with haughty pretension, the book includes many unusual flavor combinations. A dash of Angostura bitters seems to be the sisters' secret ingredient, featured in many recipes. Other ingredients seem plenty obscure (hand foraged wild ginger from Vermont, anyone?) but through "the miracle of cold storage" (huh, us plebes woul Not for the neophyte pie-baker, this collection of upscale desserts is arranged seasonally, as the authors recommend cooking with fresh, local, in-season ingredients. Dripping with haughty pretension, the book includes many unusual flavor combinations. A dash of Angostura bitters seems to be the sisters' secret ingredient, featured in many recipes. Other ingredients seem plenty obscure (hand foraged wild ginger from Vermont, anyone?) but through "the miracle of cold storage" (huh, us plebes would just call that "frozen") some ingredients at least, seem more readily available. Even if you don't attempt any of these bakes, the gorgeous full-color photographs of rustic, thick-crusted pies make this book well worth perusing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    This is my Holy Grail of pie cookbooks. Probably not for beginners and the spice profile tends to be similar from pie to pie, but just knocks it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. Special mention to the raspberry rhubarb pie and the oat crust recipe. Be aware that some of the recipes do omit sugar, which was an accident. I think they might have fixed it in new editions? Anyway, for those add 1/3 cup white sugar and you should be golden. Also, you're not going to need all the liquid specifi This is my Holy Grail of pie cookbooks. Probably not for beginners and the spice profile tends to be similar from pie to pie, but just knocks it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. Special mention to the raspberry rhubarb pie and the oat crust recipe. Be aware that some of the recipes do omit sugar, which was an accident. I think they might have fixed it in new editions? Anyway, for those add 1/3 cup white sugar and you should be golden. Also, you're not going to need all the liquid specified for the crust, just add it a bit at a time until it combines.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This is an excellent book for novelty and classic pies - there are step by step instructions for everything including what items you must have to be successful in the prep, how to for excellent pie crust - even how to roll it out. Honestly, I don't even like buying pies anymore because this book has taught me how to make pies that are better than anything I've ever tasted at the store. It's not a humble brag, I give all the credit to this book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Redmond

    Great pie book! Loved how it was set out in seasons! It was really easy to follow along and the recipes were well written.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    The pie crust alone is worth the price of admission. The sweet cherry struesel pie is heaven in a plate.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mairzi

    Interesting ideas in many of the recipes and beautiful illustrations but many of the recipes are lacking specificity which can caause confusion.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    Lots of yummy pie recipes. These ladies really know their stuff when it comes to making pies. There are pictures of each pie recipe.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kate W

    Outstanding and unusual pie recipes. Their pear-bourbon pie is a favorite. Highly recommended!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Netts

    Disappointing. There are major issues with the recipes. Example: the basic crust recipe calls for a cup and a quarter of liquid (water mixed with cider vinegar) PLUS one cup of ice (which will partially melt resulting in even more liquid). It does tell you to add it gradually but if you add anything near that amount to your pie crust you'll be making pie batter, not dough. Even 1/3 of the liquid was too much IMO. It's wasteful and very misleading for novice bakers. The dough is easy to work with Disappointing. There are major issues with the recipes. Example: the basic crust recipe calls for a cup and a quarter of liquid (water mixed with cider vinegar) PLUS one cup of ice (which will partially melt resulting in even more liquid). It does tell you to add it gradually but if you add anything near that amount to your pie crust you'll be making pie batter, not dough. Even 1/3 of the liquid was too much IMO. It's wasteful and very misleading for novice bakers. The dough is easy to work with but you DO end up tasting that vinegar, which I found off-putting. There are also problems with some of the filling recipes. In some cases all sugar and thickener are omitted from fruit pies, resulting in a runny and sour (rather than tangy) mess. Maybe the fruit they use is exceptional. But after waxing poetic about "sourcing" your ingredients (as opposed to just vulgar buying) recipes call for things like "plums" with no specification of what type might be best for baking and how to adjust between the 30+ varieties available. Some are more tart than others, even when fully ripe. A bit of sugar usually helps balance the flavours and activate the pectin. But they didn't forget the kosher salt. Why kosher? Because it's considered cool by hipsters? The large granules are ALL WRONG for baking, where they do not melt or incorporate evenly. Use fine ground sea salt and halve the amount in the recipes. The photography is mouthwatering and many of the tips useful (like starting the baking in the bottom half of the oven to set the bottom crust better) but overall this seems like a rushed book full of frustrating errors. Buy it for inspiration, as some of the combinations sound quite enticing, but keep a weary eye on recipe contents and amounts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Pie is probably my favorite desert, and this book is full of completely mouth-watering recipes. I wanted to try every single pie in this book! This book isn't for amateurs - the recipes are complicated, and most feature a pretty long list of ingredients - often including at least one item that isn't at most chain grocery stores. They do include a lot of helpful tips, and substitutions wherever possible. Most of these recipes are fairly time-consuming too - they'd be more special-occasion recipes Pie is probably my favorite desert, and this book is full of completely mouth-watering recipes. I wanted to try every single pie in this book! This book isn't for amateurs - the recipes are complicated, and most feature a pretty long list of ingredients - often including at least one item that isn't at most chain grocery stores. They do include a lot of helpful tips, and substitutions wherever possible. Most of these recipes are fairly time-consuming too - they'd be more special-occasion recipes for me, than for every day. I gave this three stars because I found some of the recipes to be fussy. You could probably streamline many of them, but only an experienced baker would know where to do that. Also, while I completely agree that local, seasonal ingredients are best, I found that they hit people over the head with that message. I've I'm making a pie with thirteen ingredients and dough that needs to be chilled at three points in the recipe, I probably know to buy the best fruit available. And the constant use of the term 'sourcing' was a little irritating. I get that they're artisans, but I purchase my ingredients, not 'source' them. The term was OK the first few times it was used, but after a while it sounds pretentious. There are some amazing recipes in here (salted caramel apple pie? several variations on rhubarb?), so if you're a serious baker this is probably worth keeping on your shelf. If not, get yourself to Brooklyn and buy some pie from the source. These recipes are well worth tasting. . . but the baking may be best left to the pros.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Gorgeous book. Dare I say coffee table worthy even. The recipes and intros are written really well and explain the intricacies of proper pie baking simply and directly. I loved the overall feel. The book definitely caters to a more refined, hipper palette (they are in Brooklyn after all), which meant that a lot of the more spiced or boozy recipes didn't work for me, as half my cooking audience is under 5. But the one pie I have made thus far was delicious and will definitely be made again. **Okay Gorgeous book. Dare I say coffee table worthy even. The recipes and intros are written really well and explain the intricacies of proper pie baking simply and directly. I loved the overall feel. The book definitely caters to a more refined, hipper palette (they are in Brooklyn after all), which meant that a lot of the more spiced or boozy recipes didn't work for me, as half my cooking audience is under 5. But the one pie I have made thus far was delicious and will definitely be made again. **Okay, I'm reducing my rating to 2 stars. I've made 2 subsequent pies, and they both have been flops. I will readily admit that it could be user error, but I consider myself on the more experienced side of the home baker, so I don't think many other at home cooks would have success with them either.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mugga

    It's been years since I bought Ken Haedrich's "Pie" and nothing will ever replace it. But I've lost a little pie mojo lately and I needed a little inspiration so with incredible restraint I put this book back on the shelf at the Booksmith and borrowed from the library. Could an old pie maker learn any new tricks? Yes. Yes, she could. The basic crust recipe, which is all butter, was extremely well behaved. It was the easiest and least frustrating lattice top I've ever made. I was also introduced It's been years since I bought Ken Haedrich's "Pie" and nothing will ever replace it. But I've lost a little pie mojo lately and I needed a little inspiration so with incredible restraint I put this book back on the shelf at the Booksmith and borrowed from the library. Could an old pie maker learn any new tricks? Yes. Yes, she could. The basic crust recipe, which is all butter, was extremely well behaved. It was the easiest and least frustrating lattice top I've ever made. I was also introduced to some alternative thickeners such as arrowroot and potato starch. That was a good start because I'm not so into shortening anymore and I never really liked corn starch as a thickener. There is little overlap in the recipes with Haedrich's book (which includes 300!) so I can justify buying it. Finally, my strawberry balsamic vinegar pie which sounds bizarre came out great.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    there were many of these pies that i will attempt to make. but i thought that many of them were too extensive and many of the ingredients were ones that would not be easy to find or readily available. i thought wow that sounds interesting but then i would see that the instructions were more than one page and then i thought uhhhh not that is too much work. i also did not like the fact that the crust recipes were in the back of the book i realize that it saves time and space in the book but it was there were many of these pies that i will attempt to make. but i thought that many of them were too extensive and many of the ingredients were ones that would not be easy to find or readily available. i thought wow that sounds interesting but then i would see that the instructions were more than one page and then i thought uhhhh not that is too much work. i also did not like the fact that the crust recipes were in the back of the book i realize that it saves time and space in the book but it was kind of complicated. but i really did like the flavor combos and the fact that it was divided into seasonal ingredients that are fresh and delicious in that time of the year. i would love to go to that bakery and eat all that pie yumm i am a fan of pie. way more than cake good job

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susanne

    Granted, so far I have only made two pies from this book - the Rhubarb Pie on page 76 and the Strawberry Balsamic Pie on page 80 - but both of those were very well received by my family. Frankly, they were super delicious and looked great. Furthermore, I would like to make almost every single pie recipe in this book, and since I borrowed it from the library and the time has come to return it, I think I will buy this one rather than just copy a few recipes. Although some of the recipes are not fo Granted, so far I have only made two pies from this book - the Rhubarb Pie on page 76 and the Strawberry Balsamic Pie on page 80 - but both of those were very well received by my family. Frankly, they were super delicious and looked great. Furthermore, I would like to make almost every single pie recipe in this book, and since I borrowed it from the library and the time has come to return it, I think I will buy this one rather than just copy a few recipes. Although some of the recipes are not for the absolute beginner, and some of the ingredients are not readily available in everyone's pantry I am recommending this book for all levels of pie bakers because the instructions are well written and illustrated. Well, my kids keep asking when I am baking the next pie ...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    this book filled an hour of my afternoon with visions of unusual pie flavor combinations made mostly from everyday ingredients. the layout and instructions are pleasantly simple, with pictures of almost every pie. several ideas for changing up the crust either by ingredient or appearance for fun finishing touches are included. i liked the seasonal order to the recipes, since it follows what our taste buds seem to want, and really really appreciated that the flavor twists were accomplished with i this book filled an hour of my afternoon with visions of unusual pie flavor combinations made mostly from everyday ingredients. the layout and instructions are pleasantly simple, with pictures of almost every pie. several ideas for changing up the crust either by ingredient or appearance for fun finishing touches are included. i liked the seasonal order to the recipes, since it follows what our taste buds seem to want, and really really appreciated that the flavor twists were accomplished with items normally on my shelves, and not super-exotic ingredients. a few recipes used alcohol, mostly in the winter section, though in small amounts which hopefully can be left out without negatively affecting the pie structure.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pat Buzby

    I love most cookbooks and this one did not disappoint. Any cookbook about Brooklyn is a good one, though I almost never get there I still feel that since my mother was born there and her mother came there from Ireland, its a part of me. This was a gift from another NJ girl who actually grew in the best NY borough and I enjoy it. The photos are very homey and the rustic pie I immediately made and enjoyed. This is my version of a coffee table book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Daigle

    Every recipe I tried from this book was delicious. If you're going to try them, though, be warned that you should have a watchful eye on your pie and not so much of a literal eye on the recipe instructions. Sure, the measurements for the pie ingredients turn out a lovely and tasty pie, but often the baking times/resting times are a bit off. As long as you're a remotely experienced home baker, you will get the hang of it, and it's well worth the effort!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This cookbook tells the story of how and why this Brooklyn pie shop came into existence. If you have never attempted making homemade pie crust they walk you through each and every step. And, there are recipes for other types of crusts. Their pies are a bit savory, I prefer the traditional flavors in pies, but this is a great book read on a cold winter's night. Oh, and the chapters are setup by season which is a terrific idea.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was skeptical at first; the authors use several ingredients I don't, like arrowroot and potato starch, and put bitters in everything... Flavors include 'plumble', salt pork apple and chocolate with green chili, and I just didn't know how to think about those. BUT-- then I made the lemon chess pie and now I am a believer. It was easy to put together and explained simply but thoroughly. And it was delicious, one of the best pies I've ever had. I can't wait to try more recipes.

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