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Der Zauberer von Oz (Marvel's Oz Comics series, #1)

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Die traumhafte Comic-Adaption des Klassikers von L. Frank Baum. Als ein Wirbelsturm die kleine Dorothy ins magische Land Oz verschlägt, macht sie versehentlich eine böse Hexe platt, befreit eine lebende Vogelscheuche und wird von den Munchkins als große Zauberin gepriesen... aber eigentlich will sie nur eins wissen: Wie kommt sie wieder nach Hause?


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Die traumhafte Comic-Adaption des Klassikers von L. Frank Baum. Als ein Wirbelsturm die kleine Dorothy ins magische Land Oz verschlägt, macht sie versehentlich eine böse Hexe platt, befreit eine lebende Vogelscheuche und wird von den Munchkins als große Zauberin gepriesen... aber eigentlich will sie nur eins wissen: Wie kommt sie wieder nach Hause?

30 review for Der Zauberer von Oz (Marvel's Oz Comics series, #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tally

    I'm not a fan of comic books or graphic novels, never have been. I've been a fan of The Wizard of Oz for as long as I can remember, and still, I had no intention of purchasing a graphic version of it when I found one at the bookshop. And then I made the mistake of leafing through it, and it was love of first sight. I don’t even know where to begin with this one. I was reading it in awe of the illustrator's skills which brought the story of Oz to life in a new, different, refreshing way. The I'm not a fan of comic books or graphic novels, never have been. I've been a fan of The Wizard of Oz for as long as I can remember, and still, I had no intention of purchasing a graphic version of it when I found one at the bookshop. And then I made the mistake of leafing through it, and it was love of first sight. I don’t even know where to begin with this one. I was reading it in awe of the illustrator's skills which brought the story of Oz to life in a new, different, refreshing way. The illustrations are absolutely breathtaking. I found myself wanting to read slowly to really appreciate the drawings, but at the same time I couldn’t help rushing through it in expectation to find out what was coming next. As I was reading, I couldn’t help falling into Baum's tale yet again. I wanted to forget any academic analysis I've ever read about this book, and just pretended it was nothing but an innocent fairytale. Easily done, in this case. Almost too easily. And what do you know? I just might start reading graphic novels more often now. Everyone should read this book. It's simply, well, wonderful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Unless you count the many Garfield and Calvin and Hobbes collections I've read, this is my first graphic novel. I can already tell that graphic novels will never be my favorite way to read a story. I considered rating this three stars because it's so faithful to the book: It's uses mainly the original text, and Dorothy's shoes are even silver! Then I remembered that I didn't like the book itself. Why would I commend the graphic novel adaption for being faithful to a book I disliked? This graphic Unless you count the many Garfield and Calvin and Hobbes collections I've read, this is my first graphic novel. I can already tell that graphic novels will never be my favorite way to read a story. I considered rating this three stars because it's so faithful to the book: It's uses mainly the original text, and Dorothy's shoes are even silver! Then I remembered that I didn't like the book itself. Why would I commend the graphic novel adaption for being faithful to a book I disliked? This graphic novel is great for a person who has no desire to read the book, but would like to learn how the original tale differs from the popluar adaptions (is there anyone like that?🤔). Also, if you love the original book, you might enjoy reading a graphic novel so faithful to the original text.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Astrid Paramita

    I have to start off by saying I don't usually read graphic novels. But I do like this book, mostly because of the wonderful illustrations of the character (especially LOVED the Cowardly Lion!). Unfortunately it's been a long while since I've read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz book so I couldn't really say anything about how true it was with the original, etc. All I know, this is a wonderful retelling of the story, with wonderful interpretation of the characters. I also really enjoy the afterword, I have to start off by saying I don't usually read graphic novels. But I do like this book, mostly because of the wonderful illustrations of the character (especially LOVED the Cowardly Lion!). Unfortunately it's been a long while since I've read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz book so I couldn't really say anything about how true it was with the original, etc. All I know, this is a wonderful retelling of the story, with wonderful interpretation of the characters. I also really enjoy the afterword, where the author and illustrator wrote about their process in making this adaptation. It makes me appreciate the story and the process even more. Overall I would recommend this book if you're an Oz fan, or you would enjoy a graphic novel from a classic story with wonderful, uplifting, and modern take on the characters :).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Don't know anything about the OZ world, but this was excellent. Way better and way different than the movie... And judging from writer Shanower's introduction (who seems to be an OZ-nut) this is a pretty legit adaptation from the original books. Looking forward to reading more.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Marie

    Pretty Juvenvile - but the artwork is amazing. I want to read the original text now.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Shanower and Young were directly responsible for drafting me back into Oz, and getting me to read the complete Baum series a few years back, but I didn't start with their first adaptation, so that makes this the first time I've read it. Their Oz should by all rights take its place alongside Baum's and, I reluctantly add, the famous Judy Garland musical. For most people, Judy Garland's movie is Oz. I get that. I also appreciate its remarkable artistic achievement, as much evident now as it was in Shanower and Young were directly responsible for drafting me back into Oz, and getting me to read the complete Baum series a few years back, but I didn't start with their first adaptation, so that makes this the first time I've read it. Their Oz should by all rights take its place alongside Baum's and, I reluctantly add, the famous Judy Garland musical. For most people, Judy Garland's movie is Oz. I get that. I also appreciate its remarkable artistic achievement, as much evident now as it was in 1939, but as I grow older I suspect more and more that it's an experience best appreciated by children. It's not just that I know a lot more about Garland's real world problems now, but that her performance, outside of her remarkable singing and iconic "Somewhere Over the Rainbow," is more and more difficult to watch, and that's a huge hurdle to leap over. It's just not good acting, a one-note warble that comes very close to canceling out the considerable charms around it. And also because I have the original book, with its original character. I'd read a little of Baum's material when I was younger, and so I had an inkling before Shanower and Young as to what it was like without Garland, without the songs. I know it's popular to say movie adaptations can never really do justice to the literary source material, but Wizard of Oz always seemed to be an exception, as with many children's books (Mary Poppins, Winnie-the-Pooh, Pinocchio) and assorted others (Planet of the Apes, M*A*S*H) that have been virtually forgotten thanks to their screen versions. Baum's material has often been difficult to find in stores, but not as difficult as some of that other material I mentioned, so it's been easier to keep in vague cultural memory. What Shanower and Young did was explode it back into the popular consciousness. With all due respect to Shanower, it was really Young's art that did the trick. Skottie Young actually later seemed to bitterly resent his time adapting Oz books (the first six, anyway), writing and drawing a vicious satire called I Hate Fairyland that was a demented hackjob of everything he'd come to be known for. But his work in the Oz comics will hopefully endure that punishment with aplomb, because it perfectly encapsulates, as previous generations were entranced by Disney movies, the childlike wonder of the source material. But astonishingly, in Wonderful Wizard of Oz, he actually seems to have considered a more subdued approach. Dorothy Gale looks cartoonish, but not as much lunatic as Young's later overall style tended to be. The trademark curlicues are there, and the Tin Woodman and Scarecrow are certainly fashioned in whimsy, but it quickly becomes apparent that Young didn't start out in the mode he would later lampoon, and that was its own discovery. The fact that this happened at all is thanks to a period in which Marvel comics gave, for its line, unprecedented creative leniency to its publishing line. This was also the period where Marvel was producing its Dark Tower comics, based on the Stephen King novels, and even the superheroes had considerable free rein. Marvel fans these days complain about the company's apparent lack of imagination, but it was in taking all that freedom as far as it could go that resulted in fans ultimately rejecting the idea that Marvel could really deviate from its famously insular approach, which had served it so well for decades, and eventually produced hugely popular Avengers movies, which themselves have begun to wobble off the axes, with probably the same eventual results (the fans who now profess a great love of Thor: Ragnarok, for example, will likely be howling with further examples of such results). Bottom line is, if you think you know Oz because you've seen Garland's movie dozens of times, or read any of the many, many later Oz books, seen and/or read Wicked, you don't know Jack (Pumpkinhead; he shows up in Marvelous Land of Oz, the second book, which when I came across it in comics form was fairly convinced Marvel had taken some liberties, but it really is the second book's title). Do yourself a favor. If you don't want to read Baum's book, read this. And then you'll be right and properly hooked...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dee Robb

    Artwork was fun.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becki

    THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ by L. Fank Baum in this edition has been adapted by Eric Shanower and illustrated by Skottie Young. It tells a recognisable story to those familiar with the film The Wizard of Oz (1939) but remains true to Baum’s original work, with Shanower and Young still managing to add their own touch to the story. The story follows the story of a girl called Dorothy who lives in the middle of the great Kansas prairies with her aunt and uncle, and her dog Toto. A tornado hits her THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ by L. Fank Baum in this edition has been adapted by Eric Shanower and illustrated by Skottie Young. It tells a recognisable story to those familiar with the film The Wizard of Oz (1939) but remains true to Baum’s original work, with Shanower and Young still managing to add their own touch to the story. The story follows the story of a girl called Dorothy who lives in the middle of the great Kansas prairies with her aunt and uncle, and her dog Toto. A tornado hits her uncle’s farm and Dorothy gets caught in the house with Toto, which gets blown away and ends up in a fantastical place called Oz. As soon as I saw Young’s gorgeous illustration on the front cover of this book I knew I wanted to read it. I’ve never read Baum’s original work, but I have seen several films based on his novels and I was curious about what was inside. I was not disappointed. THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ is everything I hoped for. The story is interesting and compelling, and the illustrations just blow me away. Whether you’re a fan of Baum’s original work, the 1939 film, or just like comics I highly recommend that you give this book a try. The storyline of THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ was pretty much what I was expecting based on the film. There are some changes like Dorothy doesn’t have the ruby slippers from the film; Shanower and Young chose to go with how (I believe) they were described in the book. I can’t comment on how similar this book is to the original, but from my perspective of just watching the film there were plenty of interesting additions to the storyline, which I thoroughly enjoyed. It was nice to explore a bit more of Oz, though the bones of the story remained the same. Skottie Young’s illustrations were absolutely magnificent. I really enjoyed his style, and think they add another dimension to the story. They really brought the story to life for me. I really enjoyed how he imagined the characters and the places – they all have a distinct feel to them. I particularly love how he’s shown the main characters. The colours are really vivid and glorious, and really help to set the atmosphere. I was sold on Young’s cover, and I think his artwork really stands up to that promise. The illustrations made the whole story – the world – more magical for me. This edition of THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ adapted by Eric Shanower and illustrated by Skottie Young is truly magical. Originally posted on The Flutterby Room.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    L. Frank Baum's masterpiece, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, must be written so well that it leads itself to visual imagery. With the popularity of the movie, and this incredible adaptation, by Eric Shanower, it is truly enjoyable to read/look at/watch. This story is about a young girl from Kansas named Dorothy, who gets caught up in a twister. When she, dog Toto, and her house land in a strange a colorful land, she finds out that she has killed the Wicked Witch of the East, and is now a hero in L. Frank Baum's masterpiece, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, must be written so well that it leads itself to visual imagery. With the popularity of the movie, and this incredible adaptation, by Eric Shanower, it is truly enjoyable to read/look at/watch. This story is about a young girl from Kansas named Dorothy, who gets caught up in a twister. When she, dog Toto, and her house land in a strange a colorful land, she finds out that she has killed the Wicked Witch of the East, and is now a hero in this new land. She still wants to find her way home, and asks a good witch for some help. The Witch tells her to go to Oz to ask the wonderful wizard who lives there. On the way, she meets up with a scarecrow, a tin woodsman, and a cowardly lion, who all have something they would also like from the Wizard of Oz. It is not an easy trip, for they keep running into different difficulties, but one of the biggest difficulties is actually getting to see the Wonderful Wizard of Oz. When they finally do, he orders them to Kill the Wicked Witch of the West. They again have a difficult road ahead of them. But they finally succeed. Will Oz live up to his end of the deal? Is he all he is really cracked up to be? Eventually, they have go to find Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, but will she have what it takes to get Dorothy home? I feel the graphics, done by Skottie Young, are a little bit Gothic, but they are very detailed. One can almost read the story without reading the words. He does an excellent job of showing the sadness in Dorothy's face as she longs for her home and her aunt and uncle. It also does a great job of showing the courage of the cowardly lion. On the other hand, I do find the scarecrow and the tin woodsman are a little harder to read, that could be on purpose because they are a scarecrow and a tin woodsman. I would recommend this book to 3-7th graders. I feel that the text is not very difficult to read, and the pictures are rather easy to follow, so I believe this age group would be able to read it. I would also recommend it as a compare and contrast between the graphic novel and the movie. I think this would be great because they are both visual adaptations, and have very similar stories, but there are many details that are very different. You could even have some students read the actual novel and compare and contrast that with the graphic novel also. Overall, I think this was a great graphic novel and I would recommend it to many people.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Graphic Novel, Copyright 2014 Genre: Fantasy. This make-believe story includes talking animals and magic. Target Audience: Intermediate, 3rd through 6th grade. Students in this age range will not only enjoy the illustrations but also the story. They may already be familiar with the story, and they will enjoy comparing the enhancements that Shanower adds to the original story. Making Connections Text to Self: I have loved this story ever since I watched it as a young girl. My great-grandmother Graphic Novel, Copyright 2014 Genre: Fantasy. This make-believe story includes talking animals and magic. Target Audience: Intermediate, 3rd through 6th grade. Students in this age range will not only enjoy the illustrations but also the story. They may already be familiar with the story, and they will enjoy comparing the enhancements that Shanower adds to the original story. Making Connections Text to Self: I have loved this story ever since I watched it as a young girl. My great-grandmother loved it too, she shared with me her memories of seeing the movie in theaters for the first time. It was the first color movie she ever saw, which was always a wonderful memory for me. I'm also a fan of every version of this story. I love the Broadway musical "Wicked" and have also read the book "Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" by Gregory Maguire. Text to Text: The most obvious connection would be to the original "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" by Frank L. Baum. Shanower's version takes some liberties and creates diversions from the original story. Students would like the creativity that Shanower adds to the story. Text to World: Students in Nebraska can make the connection to rural life in Kansas. The lifestyle between the two states at the time was very similar and students would be able to research the way Midwestern farms ran and then create their own fantasy worlds that they could connect to the farm characters.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    Well, I dragged this with me for weeks before actually sitting down and read it. Fool me! That was extremely pleasant. I've never read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz before. I've watched the Judy Garland movie some ten years ago but I didn't really like it. It was OK but... I don't know... Maybe it didn't age well: I was pretty disappointed. Then I found this adaptation on GR and the cover was really beautiful. I mean, I know I shouldn't trust an American comics from his cover but this look Well, I dragged this with me for weeks before actually sitting down and read it. Fool me! That was extremely pleasant. I've never read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz before. I've watched the Judy Garland movie some ten years ago but I didn't really like it. It was OK but... I don't know... Maybe it didn't age well: I was pretty disappointed. Then I found this adaptation on GR and the cover was really beautiful. I mean, I know I shouldn't trust an American comics from his cover but this look promising. So I bought and - surprise! - the art inside matched the cover. So, I absolutely loved the art, which is kind of me when it comes to US comics. I loved the colors and the way the artist had chosen to represent the different characters. They were all brilliant. My feelings for the plot are a bit different, though. I think the author exaggerated a litte and the story drags to much. We're East; we need to go to the Emerald City, then we need to go to the West to kill the witch; then back to the Emerald City; then North to talk with the good witch... Jeez... The story also repeats itself every now and then. When it comes to the four main characters, I mean. When they have to explain why they're traveling with Dorothy, for instance. I know children likes repetitions but for me it was sort of boring. Well, I think this book deserves at least 3,5 stars and I'll read the next one, as well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie Richardson

    For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle I actually ended up liking this book more than the original novel. I have never been a huge fan of the Oz series. I've always had kind of a weird relationship with them; I'm intrigued by the ideas and characters, but I just don't like them (and I can't stand Dorothy). But I do enjoy various retellings. I really liked this book. It perfectly combines Baum's original text with all-new, fabulous artwork. I loved the revamp of the characters. I For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle I actually ended up liking this book more than the original novel. I have never been a huge fan of the Oz series. I've always had kind of a weird relationship with them; I'm intrigued by the ideas and characters, but I just don't like them (and I can't stand Dorothy). But I do enjoy various retellings. I really liked this book. It perfectly combines Baum's original text with all-new, fabulous artwork. I loved the revamp of the characters. I especially enjoyed the artwork. I really like Young's interesting, slightly grotesque style. Very well done. The text does stick to the original story (and all it's gruesome details). This means that the book can get a little violent at times such as the Tin Man killing a cat with his ax to rescue a mouse, the Tin Man decapitating wolves (the Tin Man is surprisingly violent), and the Scarecrow wringing the necks of birds. These things happen in the original so they happen here. Young's artwork is not overly bloody or gory, but there is only so much one can do when illustrating such a story. This is not a criticism of the book, but a warning to parents who may want to give this book to their kids too soon. Overall, a very good adaptation of the original Oz story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    I reviewed the brilliant audiobook version narrated by Anne Hathaway earlier this year but this has been on my to read list for the last year. Thanks library. Shanower has created a remarkably faithful adaptation for this Marvel collection but the real applause should go to Skottie Young. He truly has created a gorgeous comic to look at with stunning and wonderfully stylised character (and world) design. There's not a single bad page and he manages to bring the light while not hiding the dark I reviewed the brilliant audiobook version narrated by Anne Hathaway earlier this year but this has been on my to read list for the last year. Thanks library. Shanower has created a remarkably faithful adaptation for this Marvel collection but the real applause should go to Skottie Young. He truly has created a gorgeous comic to look at with stunning and wonderfully stylised character (and world) design. There's not a single bad page and he manages to bring the light while not hiding the dark from the pages of L. Frank Baum's source novel. I love his Cowardly Lion and flying monkeys in particular. To be fair, equal praise should also go to Jean-Francois Beaulieu whose wonderful colours set the tone and scene; his name should really be on the front too. The combination is unique and utterly different from any other version out there and it makes it a pleasure to read, even for those well used to the story. From this, I will definitely be digging out the other Oz adaptations they've worked on.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This was really refreshing to read this adaptation of The Wizard of Oz. I've never read the book which I should but I've seen every movie, tv show, musicals when it comes to the world of Oz. When I was at the library I saw that marvel had adapted this book and I am in the mood for graphic novels so I checked this out. Many people have only watched the 1939's MGM adaptation with Judy Garland and haven't realized that the movie lacks on so many characters and their backstory when it comes to the This was really refreshing to read this adaptation of The Wizard of Oz. I've never read the book which I should but I've seen every movie, tv show, musicals when it comes to the world of Oz. When I was at the library I saw that marvel had adapted this book and I am in the mood for graphic novels so I checked this out. Many people have only watched the 1939's MGM adaptation with Judy Garland and haven't realized that the movie lacks on so many characters and their backstory when it comes to the Wizard of Oz. Eric Shanower wanted to recapture that magic that L. Frank Baum bestowed upon children when this book originally came out and wanted to incorporate it with his passion of comics. What fascinated me the most about this graphic novel is the beautiful illustrations of Skottie Young. The way he drew the characters and Oz, I was totally absorb in the magical of storytelling and gave me a brand new perspective about he Wizard of Oz. I highly recommend this book to those who read the Wizard of Oz or to those who have only seen the movie.

  15. 5 out of 5

    syrin

    I have to admit: even though I've watched the movie adaptation countless times, in both black and white and color version, it's never been one of my favorite movies. Too much singing, perhaps? Having seen the movie, I wasn't all that keen about reading the original book, but when I saw this comic book adaptation being passed around right in front of me, I just couldn't resist and had to give it a try. And I'm gad I did. The story differs a bit from the movie version, at least as far as I I have to admit: even though I've watched the movie adaptation countless times, in both black and white and color version, it's never been one of my favorite movies. Too much singing, perhaps? Having seen the movie, I wasn't all that keen about reading the original book, but when I saw this comic book adaptation being passed around right in front of me, I just couldn't resist and had to give it a try. And I'm gad I did. The story differs a bit from the movie version, at least as far as I remember. It's longer, there are more characters and even some of the most recognizable elements are different (like the shoes, who are silver instead of red). But the thing that really drew my in wasn't the story, it was the art. Such a beautiful depiction of this story. Dorothy was so cute! And the cowardly lion... I want one of those too! Also, the little touches of dark humor were a plus.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anika

    Generally, I think having a faithful adaptation in graphic novel form has it’s own intrinsic value. Specifically, I felt like I was reading the comic book novelization of a Studio Ghibli adaptation of The Wizard of Oz that was put out by someone who had written the text without watching Miyazaki’s version. What I mean is while it was interesting to look at, the text and the art seemed at odds. They were telling the same story but there was a disconnect between how it was being done. So it felt Generally, I think having a faithful adaptation in graphic novel form has it’s own intrinsic value. Specifically, I felt like I was reading the comic book novelization of a Studio Ghibli adaptation of The Wizard of Oz that was put out by someone who had written the text without watching Miyazaki’s version. What I mean is while it was interesting to look at, the text and the art seemed at odds. They were telling the same story but there was a disconnect between how it was being done. So it felt clunky to me instead of sweeping and left me with the impression “Oh, I’ve read that” more than “Wow, that was awesome” or “Ew, that was awful”. But while I may not personally connect with the story or characters it’s a classic, and beloved, for a reason and I like it well enough.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I don't think I was the primary audience for this book, but I did appreciate the unconventional spin on a story I thought I knew--Shanower's version made me almost want to dig up L. Frank Baum's original, and Skottie Young's art and inventive designs for familiar characters (for the most part) distracted me from the repetition probably meant to help children follow the story. In the end, what I liked most about the book was its message, which I think is summed up pretty well in a conversation I don't think I was the primary audience for this book, but I did appreciate the unconventional spin on a story I thought I knew--Shanower's version made me almost want to dig up L. Frank Baum's original, and Skottie Young's art and inventive designs for familiar characters (for the most part) distracted me from the repetition probably meant to help children follow the story. In the end, what I liked most about the book was its message, which I think is summed up pretty well in a conversation between Dorothy and the Wizard... Wizard: Why should I do this for you? Dorothy: Because you are strong and I am weak--because you are a great wizard and I'm only a helpless little girl. Despite their cowardice, heart- and brainlessness, Dorothy and her friends do alright.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Artemisa

    I read The Wizard of Oz (the non graphic one) a couple of years ago, and I liked it, I saw the movie when I was little, and even if I love it I haven't seen it in a loooong loong time. This book had all those idealized memories to beat, and that is usually though. But made it. The story follows the original book almost to the letter, the descriptions of the country replaced by the drawings. I liked the characters drawings, the mustache on the tin man is one of my favourite details. And I also liked I read The Wizard of Oz (the non graphic one) a couple of years ago, and I liked it, I saw the movie when I was little, and even if I love it I haven't seen it in a loooong loong time. This book had all those idealized memories to beat, and that is usually though. But made it. The story follows the original book almost to the letter, the descriptions of the country replaced by the drawings. I liked the characters drawings, the mustache on the tin man is one of my favourite details. And I also liked the art in general, that almost water colour aesthetic, it feels right with the wizard of oz story... The final touch is the character's sketches and the covers and alternate covers at the end of the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    I love The Wizard of Oz series, and as someone new to graphic novels I thought this might be a good way in as it's a story I'm familiar with. I wasn't entirely wrong on that assessment. The artwork in this is absolutely beautiful. I lost a fair amount of time just admiring it because it is just that gorgeous. Unfortunately, for me, the writing and how the story was generally put across was a bit clunky. That's just my personal taste, and really it only had a minor impact on my enjoyment. I will I love The Wizard of Oz series, and as someone new to graphic novels I thought this might be a good way in as it's a story I'm familiar with. I wasn't entirely wrong on that assessment. The artwork in this is absolutely beautiful. I lost a fair amount of time just admiring it because it is just that gorgeous. Unfortunately, for me, the writing and how the story was generally put across was a bit clunky. That's just my personal taste, and really it only had a minor impact on my enjoyment. I will definitely be picking up the next in the series because the stories are ones I love, and the artwork just gives them a new lease of life!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marcela

    I've honestly never been a huge fan of the Oz books, even as a child. It probably has much to do with the constant repetition, which (of course) I don't remember annoying me as much when I read the stories as a child, but made me utterly crazy during this read. Gripes-of-an-adult-reader aside, Young's art alone made this an incredible book. I'd frame some of these panels and hang them up if I could. While perhaps not for many adult readers, I have little doubt that this book would be a treat for I've honestly never been a huge fan of the Oz books, even as a child. It probably has much to do with the constant repetition, which (of course) I don't remember annoying me as much when I read the stories as a child, but made me utterly crazy during this read. Gripes-of-an-adult-reader aside, Young's art alone made this an incredible book. I'd frame some of these panels and hang them up if I could. While perhaps not for many adult readers, I have little doubt that this book would be a treat for any child. Seems like a fun bedtime read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Meg McGregor

    I actually have had the privilege of meeting Mr. Shanower years ago in Vegas when MGM had the OZ theme in its resort. He was gracious and autographed several copies of his different books. That saying, I was so excited to see a graphic novel based on the first book in the OZ series. The adaptation is skillfully written by Mr. Shanower and keeps intact the whimsical story that we have all grown up on. But the illustrations are not good. That is all I will say. I simply don't care for them at all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    The pictures are great and lend an all-new meaning to the story, especially if all you know is the 1939 film version of the book. The introduction alone is worth reading, just to gain some insight into L. Frank Baum. That said, I don't know how much of the dialogue belongs to Baum and how much belongs to Eric Shanower...what I do know is that beautiful as the artwork my be, the writing quickly becomes tedious due to repetition. Pick it up, give it a shot...with a little more editing this one The pictures are great and lend an all-new meaning to the story, especially if all you know is the 1939 film version of the book. The introduction alone is worth reading, just to gain some insight into L. Frank Baum. That said, I don't know how much of the dialogue belongs to Baum and how much belongs to Eric Shanower...what I do know is that beautiful as the artwork my be, the writing quickly becomes tedious due to repetition. Pick it up, give it a shot...with a little more editing this one could easily be five stars!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Wilson

    a brilliant and faithfull adaptation of the book. whatever failings you may find are likely to be Baum's errors rtaher than the adaptor and artist. i loved the design for the scarecrow and lion in particular. it doesn't pander to a post MGM musical audience (dorothy waers silver shoes and the witch has one eye and an umbrella) and as a consequence can feel brilliantly dark at times. highly highly recommended :D

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joana

    (2,5) While the art of this book is really beautiful- and the few pages at the end with initial sketches are amazing to look at an analyse, I'm sad to say those where not only the best but the only great things about the book. The story is interesting and all and the way the characters speak intringing- but the plot is a mess of problems thrown together like no other. It would have been a lot better if the book was broken up by different chapters/issues for each different plot arch.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Wallis

    I'm not really sure if I liked reading Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz or if I just found it mildly entertaining. I actually had a difficult time wanting to read the graphic novel. Of course, the storyline is great and all, but it was just reading a different version of the story than the old "The Wizard of Oz" movie that made it difficult for me. The art was great, but the dialog was choppy. I am looking forward to reading the next in the series, though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kami

    - This was a great adaptation of the book. It has been a while since I read this, but from what I remember the story was very accurate. - I loved the illustrations! The style was perfect for the story. I felt like there was a little Tim Burton influence in certain characters and scenery. - Reading this made me want to read the book again. It is such a classic tale that just never gets old!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Lovely graphic novel. Amazing quirky artwork, lovely characters & a great plot charming but wonderfully dark & bittersweet :) Like a lot of people I saw the Judy Garland film as a kid but never read the book so when I saw this graphic adaptation published by Marvel at my library I had 2 read it & how different it is from the film! More mature, modern, fleshed out, lovely 2 look out beautifully told famous fairy tale. Highly recommend this version if u like graphic adaptations.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary McCoy

    I've always loved the Wizard of Oz growing up as a child so this graphic novel brought a lot of wonderful nostalgic memories back to life. The art style is so lovely and vibrant and the story writing itself has a great charm and easy flow to it. All in all, a great piece that really warmed the heart, and was a perfect first read for the spring time! I give it 5 out of 5 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Erb

    Beautiful and accessible graphic novelization of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Maintained many of the original elements of the book itself, while also pulling in from the classic movie design, when it was welcome. --- I give it four stars. Very glad to have read it, and would recommend to Oz fans or folks looking to explore graphic novels through a familiar story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zen

    That was absolutely lovely. Until I picked up this comic book, I actually knew little of The Wizard of Oz. I don't know how true this was to the book, but I will definitely be checking it out soon. The art is VERY beautiful. I really liked it and all the sketches at the back. I will now have to read it a second time just to be able to appreciate the artist's work more. :)

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