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Children of Fire

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Long ago the gods chose a great hero to act as their agent in the mortal world and to stand against the demonic spawn of Chaos. The gods gifted their champion, Daemron, with three magical Talismans: a sword, a ring, and a crown. But the awesome power at his command corrupted Daemron, turning him from savior to destroyer. Filled with pride, he dared to challenge the gods th Long ago the gods chose a great hero to act as their agent in the mortal world and to stand against the demonic spawn of Chaos. The gods gifted their champion, Daemron, with three magical Talismans: a sword, a ring, and a crown. But the awesome power at his command corrupted Daemron, turning him from savior to destroyer. Filled with pride, he dared to challenge the gods themselves. Siding with the Chaos spawn, Daemron waged a titanic battle against the Immortals. In the end, Daemron was defeated, the Talismans were lost, and Chaos was sealed off behind the Legacy—a magical barrier the gods sacrificed themselves to create.   Now the Legacy is fading. On the other side, the banished Daemron stirs. And across the scattered corners of the land, four children are born of suffering and strife, each touched by one aspect of Daemron himself—wizard, warrior, prophet, king.   Bound by a connection deeper than blood, the Children of Fire will either restore the Legacy or bring it crashing down, freeing Daemron to wreak his vengeance upon the mortal world.


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Long ago the gods chose a great hero to act as their agent in the mortal world and to stand against the demonic spawn of Chaos. The gods gifted their champion, Daemron, with three magical Talismans: a sword, a ring, and a crown. But the awesome power at his command corrupted Daemron, turning him from savior to destroyer. Filled with pride, he dared to challenge the gods th Long ago the gods chose a great hero to act as their agent in the mortal world and to stand against the demonic spawn of Chaos. The gods gifted their champion, Daemron, with three magical Talismans: a sword, a ring, and a crown. But the awesome power at his command corrupted Daemron, turning him from savior to destroyer. Filled with pride, he dared to challenge the gods themselves. Siding with the Chaos spawn, Daemron waged a titanic battle against the Immortals. In the end, Daemron was defeated, the Talismans were lost, and Chaos was sealed off behind the Legacy—a magical barrier the gods sacrificed themselves to create.   Now the Legacy is fading. On the other side, the banished Daemron stirs. And across the scattered corners of the land, four children are born of suffering and strife, each touched by one aspect of Daemron himself—wizard, warrior, prophet, king.   Bound by a connection deeper than blood, the Children of Fire will either restore the Legacy or bring it crashing down, freeing Daemron to wreak his vengeance upon the mortal world.

30 review for Children of Fire

  1. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    All things are born from fire. The flames of Chaos are the source of all life and all creation; the cause of all death and all destruction. The entirety of the mortal world was forged from the inferno of the Burning Sea, the Chaos shaped and bound by the power of the Old Gods to create an island of tranquility floating in an ocean of flame. Once upon a time, the immortal Daemron, champion of the gods against Chaos, betrayed them all and was sealed away from the world behind the barrier known as the L All things are born from fire. The flames of Chaos are the source of all life and all creation; the cause of all death and all destruction. The entirety of the mortal world was forged from the inferno of the Burning Sea, the Chaos shaped and bound by the power of the Old Gods to create an island of tranquility floating in an ocean of flame. Once upon a time, the immortal Daemron, champion of the gods against Chaos, betrayed them all and was sealed away from the world behind the barrier known as the Legacy. But the Legacy is weakening, and as Daemron ritualistically attempts his return, the power of his talismans split in four and scatter. But then four children are born. Children of Fire is almost stereotypically a diamond in the rough. There are so many qualities here, so much potential. But the writing style, the structure of the narrative, and some of the more simplistic naming conventions used are all unfortunately taking away the chance of realising that potential. I was also slightly disappointed that most of the epic events and worldbreaking threats for the legendary past are never fully established. The way Daemron is presented, he only seems like an interesting side character whose exploits you want to read more about, which makes it hard to see him as threat whose return you should be afraid of. Similarly, “the Order”, fanatically religious inquisitor who used to purge and massacre magic-users, seem more like a nice bunch of chill monks. Drew Karpyshyn has masterminded some of the most magnificent epics I have ever experienced, as BioWare’s lead writer for both Knights of the Old Republic (*cough* the best video game ever made *cough*) and Mass Effect; both science fiction role-playing game masterpieces. He’s helped create worlds, stories and characters that I have come to deeply care about. This all shines through when he tries his hand in the writing of free-form literature. Sure, he’s written tie-in novels for both Star Wars and Mass Effect in the past, but they are always merely supplements to video games rather than standalone works of fiction. He is still a master of creating, but not yet a master of adapting his creations to the page. I am saddened to say that every time I put the book down, I had no desire to pick it back up again until I forced myself. The whole book felt like it would have been better as a video game, but I can understand why Karpyshyn wished to try something else.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    This book goes down some well trodden fantasy paths. As I've noted over and over this is not necessarily a bad thing but it "needs" to be done right. Prophecies of a coming hero to save the world, multiple points of view to tell the story, young person/people called to "destiny" (every time I see that someone has or is called to a "destiny" I think of George Mcfly [Marty's dad in Back to the Future] saying to his future wife, "I'm your density").... Anyway, children of destiny. Th This book goes down some well trodden fantasy paths. As I've noted over and over this is not necessarily a bad thing but it "needs" to be done right. Prophecies of a coming hero to save the world, multiple points of view to tell the story, young person/people called to "destiny" (every time I see that someone has or is called to a "destiny" I think of George Mcfly [Marty's dad in Back to the Future] saying to his future wife, "I'm your density").... Anyway, children of destiny. The magic system here assumes that all magic apparently comes from Chaos. Seemingly Chaos is the natural state of things but at some point some powerful individuals (who got called gods, but have since died) pulled a world of order together and set protection. There was an assault by Chaos so these "mortal gods" picked a "worthy hero" a "champion" and gave him some powerful artifacts to control Chaos magic and fight the Chaos Spawn and resist the Chaos. It seems he did...at first but then the Champion (a la Diablo 1) lost control of the artifacts, "joined" Chaos and became the main enemy. The said "mortal gods" defeated him, his the artifacts and locked him away from the world. But of course they knew this wouldn't hold so there are now proficiencies that the "Destroyer" (who used to be the champion) will return. When this happens the new hero to save the world will be born Of course all this happened before the book opens. As the book opens the birth is about to take place...but we don't get one birth no, we get 4. So for the first part of the book we bounce around between the stories of 4 infants and how their lives go, what happens to them and so on. For this part of then book you could almost use a program to keep up with which child we're being told about and what's happening to who. I'm never a big fan of the bounce between characters motif, but it works. here it takes a while to shake itself out and settle in. Once the babies become children the stories start to take shape though i do think the story is still a bit slow for a while. Somewhere around the middle of the book we finally hit our stride and tell an intense and somewhat enthralling read. The end of the novel is very a much a "run out and get the next volume of the series" ending as we have set up a lot of coming attractions but our characters are all in precarious positions. We also introduce another element to the plot just as the epilogue closes...so, yeah series teaser at the end of the book. All in all if we had the often mentioned and never happening half star system (and if we got it now I'd have to back through a lot of books and "re'rank them") I might have called this a "high 3.5 out of 5 because it starts so slowly. Still it's a good read and I can recommend it. I plan to pick up the next. Enjoy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    I'd looked forward to this novel for a long time, ever since last year when Drew Karpyshyn announced he was leaving BioWare to focus on his own original book project. Having very much enjoyed his work in video games in the past, including the novels that spawned out of the Mass Effect and Star Wars: The Old Republic universes, I was disappointed to see him go but was also very curious as to what he was working on. Turned out, it was Children of Fire, the first book of his idea for a new epic fan I'd looked forward to this novel for a long time, ever since last year when Drew Karpyshyn announced he was leaving BioWare to focus on his own original book project. Having very much enjoyed his work in video games in the past, including the novels that spawned out of the Mass Effect and Star Wars: The Old Republic universes, I was disappointed to see him go but was also very curious as to what he was working on. Turned out, it was Children of Fire, the first book of his idea for a new epic fantasy series, and it sounded something he'd been cooking in his head for long time. After years of reading his Star Wars and video game tie-in novels, I was very interested in seeing what Drew can do with his very own story and characters. My thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with this e-ARC. About the book: Long ago, a great warrior called Daemron was was chosen by the gods to lead the war against the Chaos spawn. He was given three magical talismans to aid him in the fight -- a crown, a ring, and a sword. Daemron, however, grew corrupted with their power and ended up turning against the gods. The savior of the world instead became its destroyer. Daemron was thwarted in the end, banished to a plane beyond the Chaos Sea, sealed behind barrier called the Legacy. A religious cabal called The Order have been tasked to maintain this magical shield, protecting the world from the Chaos and its minions. The three magical talismans were hidden away or lost. Now the Legacy weakens, and Daemron grows strong enough to cast his essence into the world. Across the land, four Chaos-touched children are born beneath a blood red moon, each embodying an aspect of Daemron himself. Though Keegan, Scythe, Vaaler, and Cassandra grow up in different places with different lives, their fates are intertwined -- but whether it is their destiny to restore the Legacy or unleash the destroyer upon the world is yet unknown. My thoughts: I loved lots of things about this book, and on the top of that list was the sweeping, overarching feel of the story. The introduction including the details surrounding the four children's origins was in my opinion the best part of the book. While all born of "suffering and strife", the background and circumstances of each child were nonetheless unique and interesting. The character development continues as we follow the four children, and we get glimpses into the major events of their lives as they grow up. But as we edged closer towards the present and more and more talk of fate and destiny crept into the picture, that's when I hit a wall. I still enjoyed the story very much, but at this point everything began to feel a lot more run-of-the-mill and typical. It is possible that I am just a bit more critical of the fantasy I read these days, especially if they come with the description of "innovative epic fantasy", but I admit I expected a lot more from the characters and plot. Both bordered on the cut-and-dried and formulaic after while, which I felt was the main thing holding back the story. I know the concept of the Big-Damn-Hero-destined-to-save-the-world is one that's tried and true, but it's very in-your-face here and nowadays I crave a lot more out of my fantasy reads. And maybe I'm just still not used to seeing the author's writing outside of media adaptations, but while I love his "pulpy" style in Star Wars and game tie-in books, here it kind of feels out of place for the kind of story he wants to tell. I thought that more focus could have been placed on the setting and supporting characters too, to give the story as a whole more of an "epic" vibe, because I didn't feel like I was getting enough of history and identity from this original world he's establishing from scratch. The Danaan people and their cities come to mind, for example. I also think some of the points I brought up above could do with the pacing. I think Drew Karpyshyn did a fantastic job presenting to us his main characters, considering there are four of them and that's quite a few different perspectives to follow. Keegan gets the bulk of the attention, though, and I wished we could have seen more of of the others at different ages because it feels like a couple of them disappear for a long stretches at a time. When they resurface, sometimes years afterward, I don't feel like I know them enough anymore to know if it only seems like dialogue feels forced, or if they are actually acting out of character. Overall, this ended up being more of a fun read than a truly epic read, and became a lot better once I shifted my expectations accordingly. It felt like the book could have benefited from a little more structural editing to address pacing issues and plot and character development, but it was a great introduction to a brand new world of magic and fantasy lore. I'm a big fan of Drew Karpyshyn, and I'm glad he finally got the chance to bring his own ideas to life and share it with his readers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    Children of Fire is, in every way, pure popcorn fantasy. In other words, I think anyone coming into this expecting the kind of high concept epic featuring complex, iconic characters, groundbreaking uses of magic, or uniquely compelling world building is setting themselves up for disappointment, because to be honest, Drew Karpyshyn’s first foray into original material is mostly a retread of familiar ground. But that said, I do think this is still a book that has plenty of merit as a compulsively read Children of Fire is, in every way, pure popcorn fantasy. In other words, I think anyone coming into this expecting the kind of high concept epic featuring complex, iconic characters, groundbreaking uses of magic, or uniquely compelling world building is setting themselves up for disappointment, because to be honest, Drew Karpyshyn’s first foray into original material is mostly a retread of familiar ground. But that said, I do think this is still a book that has plenty of merit as a compulsively readable, wildly entertaining retread, because even though the fantasy elements are simplistic stereotypes and cliches, in this case, it’s not a bad thing at all, because Karpyshyn has done an excellent job putting them together in a way that’s easily accessible, but more importantly, interesting and engaging. What makes the book for me is definitely the almost cinematic quality of the storytelling. As anyone who’s for example both read Lord of the Rings and watched Peter Jackson’s movies would know, watching the movies is a completely different experience from reading the books. And while most fantasy books aim to replicate that heavy, voluminous feel of Tolkien’s books (and Karpyshyn even cites Tolkien as one of his influences), Children of Fire is the exception that, with its simpler storyline and plenty of cinematic action sequences, feels more like watching the movie adaption, or maybe one of those old sword and sorcery TV shows. So although the setup involves nothing but generic fantasy stereotypes and nothing in Children of Fire screams unique or different from every other fantasy out there - even if Karpyshyn calls his elves (and they obviously are the generic woodland dwelling elder race everybody else calls elves) the Danaan - none of it really mattered for me because Children of Fire is a different, yet nonetheless enjoyable, reading experience from the typical fantasy. For me, the point of this book really wasn’t to build a complex fantasy world or to create an immersive cast of scheming, backstabbing characters, but just to follow a group of characters on a very simple quest of good versus evil while being entertained by the gobs of addictive action sequences along the way - and I was definitely entertained; it really is addictive. The other aspect I really liked is that while following these various children of fire through their quests to save the world (and the passage of time is something I think Karpyshyn does well and makes the book feel more epic), he never resorts to the same old black and white characters that can really sink these kinds of books. Of course, there’s this demon character the Slayer who’s been imprisoned in an alternate dimension for eons and planning his revenge now that the barrier between the worlds has been weakened (sounds like a Buffy plot, no?), but the other characters never predictably fall into one category or the other. For example, there’s the Pontiff and his Order of anti-magic fanatics dedicated to stopping the Slayer by whatever means necessary, but while the sorcerer characters like Rexol perceive them as evil based on what they do, they consider themselves good, and you know, their eventual actions go both ways (plus, who doesn’t like reading about badass blind monks?). Even Rexol and the Danaan Queen Rianna, they have an understandable goal and course of action that helps and hinders the various children, but they can’t be said to be doing what they do because they’re ‘good’ or ‘evil’, and that ambiguity in the characters really makes up for the genericness of the plot and setting. Still, in addition to the setup I did have one other problem with the book. Like I said, I thought the way Karpyshyn handled the passage of time from the birth of the children to their quest to save the world, over a period of years, was definitely a strong point of the book, but I really feel there may have been a few more coincidences in the book than necessary. The various intertwining storylines was definitely a great idea and a huge part of what makes the book work, but while many of them, like Cassandra being Rexol’s first apprentice followed by Keegan as his second, are understandable and in retrospect pretty cool, others, like the whole storyline with Scythe, felt really contrived. In fact, I’m not really sure of Scythe’s role in the story - is she even one of them? - and her inclusion feels more like a plot contrivance so we end with a party consisting of a warrior, a mage, a monk, and a rogue than anything else. Overall though, while Children of Fire is a lot simpler than most fantasies, I think Drew Karpyshyn has made it simpler in a way that also makes it accessible to many first time or reluctant fantasy readers. Even better, I personally read a lot of fantasy and still found the story, despite its flaws, incredibly addictive, precisely because this is a book that makes the stereotypes work.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Four unique children are born under a portent omen, each touched by Chaos in some way. Initially, the story moves through the lives of all four, leaping through time as they grow and deal with varied situations that shape them towards their destiny. Their paths cross in various ways until they reach adulthood and then dark forces are unleashed... I've played the Bioware games Karpyshyn has been heavily involved in as a writer and I have read one of his Star Wars books, as well as his Mass Effect books. With thos Four unique children are born under a portent omen, each touched by Chaos in some way. Initially, the story moves through the lives of all four, leaping through time as they grow and deal with varied situations that shape them towards their destiny. Their paths cross in various ways until they reach adulthood and then dark forces are unleashed... I've played the Bioware games Karpyshyn has been heavily involved in as a writer and I have read one of his Star Wars books, as well as his Mass Effect books. With those, I found that his writing was not as strong as the ideas and characters behind it and concluded that Karpyshyn works best when his ideas and characters can be visually brought to life. Perhaps he'd do a better job with the comic book stories. However, Children of Fire is Karpyshyn's first novel of his own creation, and I'm always curious to see what a creator can do when freed from the constraints of an established franchise. So far, I'm very pleased. I don't feel this book is a strong entry into the epic fantasy genre, however, it has a lot of potential. Actually, considering how I feel about epic fantasy classics like Eye of the World, Children of Fire is very good. The characters are strong, unique and memorable, and there's little time wasted on too much exposition. I was worried at first, with the format of travelling through the children's lives as they aged, but Karpyshyn did a good job of telling only what was needed at each given point in their lives. There are some typical fantasy tropes used, such as talismans, chosen ones, dark lords, fellowships and seemingly evil ruling bodies. I liked the latter two items though, because they did not quite follow the conventional 'rules.' When the four children cross paths, their interaction is not predictable, and the Order, who seeks out people who wield Chaos magic, does so for a good reason. I did enjoy the magical aspect of the story. There is a lot of lore behind it and varying opinions on those with magical abilities, but I liked that Karpyshyn doesn't use the magic as a crutch to easily get his characters out of situations. In fact, the moments when magic is used serves to advance the plot and develop the characters themselves. See more reviews at The BiblioSanctum

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    This book goes down some well trodden fantasy paths. As I've noted over and over this is not necessarily a bad thing but it "needs" to be done right. Prophecies of a coming hero to save the world, multiple points of view to tell the story, young person/people called to "destiny" (every time I see that someone has or is called to a "destiny" I think of George Mcfly [Marty's dad in Back to the Future] saying to his future wife, "I'm your density").... Anyway, children of destiny. Th This book goes down some well trodden fantasy paths. As I've noted over and over this is not necessarily a bad thing but it "needs" to be done right. Prophecies of a coming hero to save the world, multiple points of view to tell the story, young person/people called to "destiny" (every time I see that someone has or is called to a "destiny" I think of George Mcfly [Marty's dad in Back to the Future] saying to his future wife, "I'm your density").... Anyway, children of destiny. The magic system here assumes that all magic apparently comes from Chaos. Seemingly Chaos is the natural state of things but at some point some powerful individuals (who got called gods, but have since died) pulled a world of order together and set protection. There was an assault by Chaos so these "mortal gods" picked a "worthy hero" a "champion" and gave him some powerful artifacts to control Chaos magic and fight the Chaos Spawn and resist the Chaos. It seems he did...at first but then the Champion (a la Diablo 1) lost control of the artifacts, "joined" Chaos and became the main enemy. The said "mortal gods" defeated him, his the artifacts and locked him away from the world. But of course they knew this wouldn't hold so there are now proficiencies that the "Destroyer" (who used to be the champion) will return. When this happens the new hero to save the world will be born Of course all this happened before the book opens. As the book opens the birth is about to take place...but we don't get one birth no, we get 4. So for the first part of the book we bounce around between the stories of 4 infants and how their lives go, what happens to them and so on. For this part of then book you could almost use a program to keep up with which child we're being told about and what's happening to who. I'm never a big fan of the bounce between characters motif, but it works. here it takes a while to shake itself out and settle in. Once the babies become children the stories start to take shape though i do think the story is still a bit slow for a while. Somewhere around the middle of the book we finally hit our stride and tell an intense and somewhat enthralling read. The end of the novel is very a much a "run out and get the next volume of the series" ending as we have set up a lot of coming attractions but our characters are all in precarious positions. We also introduce another element to the plot just as the epilogue closes...so, yeah series teaser at the end of the book. All in all if we had the often mentioned and never happening half star system (and if we got it now I'd have to back through a lot of books and "re'rank them") I might have called this a "high 3.5 out of 5 because it starts so slowly. Still it's a good read and I can recommend it. I plan to pick up the next. Enjoy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    A great work of fantasy fiction by Drew Karpyshyn. Other reviewers have drafted good summaries of the book. I can add that this book was fun to read, and that is not something that I can say about some fantasy books. Sometimes it seems like an author is trying to wrap up and show off the contents of every Dungeons & Dragons module and Terry Pratchett book they read into one novel. World-building often seems to be the focus, too frequently at the expense of a coherent plot and well-developed A great work of fantasy fiction by Drew Karpyshyn. Other reviewers have drafted good summaries of the book. I can add that this book was fun to read, and that is not something that I can say about some fantasy books. Sometimes it seems like an author is trying to wrap up and show off the contents of every Dungeons & Dragons module and Terry Pratchett book they read into one novel. World-building often seems to be the focus, too frequently at the expense of a coherent plot and well-developed characters. Karpyshyn pulls off all three factors in equal balance. He writes a good tale, interweaving the stories of the major characters and describing their world without shoving details at us in contrived didactic monologues. The world and the characters are just complex enough to be interesting, but not so complex that you need a chart, three maps, and a glossary. Like his sci-fi novels, this book is good fun. I have book two of the trilogy - The Scorched Earth - waiting for me on my bookshelf.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brenda A

    This is so much better than all the other fantasy crap that's out there right now. I delayed reading this for so long because I had a crap ton of fantasy books to get through and I could tell I was getting steadily more bored with them as I went. I was worried the same would happen here, so I held off. I really had nothing to worry about. It's slow building as with most fantasy novels, but it manages to stay interesting and keep a steady pace the whole way through. It relies heav This is so much better than all the other fantasy crap that's out there right now. I delayed reading this for so long because I had a crap ton of fantasy books to get through and I could tell I was getting steadily more bored with them as I went. I was worried the same would happen here, so I held off. I really had nothing to worry about. It's slow building as with most fantasy novels, but it manages to stay interesting and keep a steady pace the whole way through. It relies heavily on characterization and the author did a brilliant job of fleshing out each individual person. Cassandra was a thousand leagues apart from Keegan who was light years away from Scythe who was a million clicks away from Vaaler. It never felt like I was reading just one voice. While the characterization was the foundation, where the novel really shines is with the climax. I realize that may be an obvious statement, but there's been plenty of times in the past where a book that was meant to keep me on the edge of my seat did nothing to excite. When the Minions (who are incredibly fucking awesome in their own right) sneak into the world it is literally hell on Earth. I couldn't get enough of them, and I fervently hope that they will play a larger role in the next book. Keegan's culmination of power is probably the most dramatic bit while he fights a dragon. It's just so freaking entertaining and I was glad I kept along with the slow and steady pace of characterization in the beginning. The only thing I dislike is how idiotic Keegan was and how stubborn Scythe. I almost don't even want to say it just because I'm so happy the author made them so vastly different, but I can't help it. They got on my nerves (but only mildly) a few times, but it was never enough to make me hate them. They were still strong characters with their flaws and I rooted for them the whole way through.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    I have been trying to read this book since it first came out and now that I have I am blown away. Truly epic. Grand in scale and very ambitious in design. This story delivers. Ancient evil returning, destinies being created, characters faced with repercussions to their actions, fast paced and engaging. A story worth reading!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    In full disclosure I won an Advanced Readers Copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The first third of this book details the birth and early life of the “Children of Fire”, they are born under different circumstances, one is a prince, another the daughter of a minor noble, a third is the son of a farmer the forth is born in a brothel. They live their separate lives, but there are certain similarities and overlap. One of the few criticisms I have for this part of the sto In full disclosure I won an Advanced Readers Copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The first third of this book details the birth and early life of the “Children of Fire”, they are born under different circumstances, one is a prince, another the daughter of a minor noble, a third is the son of a farmer the forth is born in a brothel. They live their separate lives, but there are certain similarities and overlap. One of the few criticisms I have for this part of the story is we are often told how many years have passed since we last read about the character we have just switched to, but we are not always told how old they are now. I thought the author was successful at giving enough reminders of a character when the POV switches back to them. This helped me remember who this character was and what was happening with their part of the story. There was never too much of a recap which would have slowed the pace. All four characters were interesting without being exceptional. I wanted to hear from them all. I was interested in reading about whoever the current POV character was and wanted to hear what was happening to them, but simultaneously I also wanted to hear from characters I hadn’t read about for a while. The characters each have their own personalities, which were consistent but also developed as they continue through life. The rest of the book details the characters at about 18 years old, and it is were there main part of the story starts. We no longer have the rapid jumping forward in time and the characters lives begin to cross over more. I thought the secondary characters were well written and realistic. Most of the major players believe that they are good people trying to do to the right thing and they are working towards defeating the great evil (a character known as the Slayer). Each of them had different believes and different ways of dealing with the Slayer, often at odds with the other characters. Sometimes what they do is helping one of the main characters and at other times they are harming them. This led to ambiguity for these secondary characters making them more interesting. It was also interesting to see how the main characters behaved when the met with one another. Sometimes they would work together which was great, but sometimes they were at odds with one another which was very interesting as I had grown to like all of the characters and wanted them all to succeed. The descriptions are fairly good, perhaps a little short compared to most fantasy novels, but there is always enough there to clearly follow what was happening. The short descriptions did help keep the pace up as well. The story is very good, while it is true to say there isn’t really anything original about it, there are defiantly strong similarities to Robert Jordan’s Wheel of time, as well as some similarities to Tolkien, Terry Brooks and other traditional fantasy authors. I didn’t think it mattered too much since the story is exciting and enjoyable. The pacing was fast, it didn’t really feel like an epic fantasy, but more like a movie, mostly due to its light concepts, familiar ideas and high amount of action. This did make for a fast and enjoyable read even if there was nothing exceptional about it. There were quite a few times were a character acted in a way that seemed to be in a way to set up plot or start a piece of action (such as when Jerrod started a barroom brawl when he was supposed to be protecting Keegan and keeping a low profile) rather than act in a way that would be realistic or consist with the character. I thought the world building and the magic system was well developed. We are told about it in a way that felt natural and are given the information at an appropriate time. There was never a time that I felt this went of for too long, if anything it was too short. There wasn’t a map included, although this was an ARC so perhaps there will be one in the final edition. I really felt like this book would have benefited from having one, there are a few kingdoms and many cities and it would have been nice having a clear way to see how they were all linked. There is nothing particularly wonderful about this book, it is not original, the magic system and world are traditional and the characters are good without being exceptional. But somehow the author makes the story interesting, exciting and easy to read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Warren

    I really dug this book. The prose is simple to follow (william gibson is my favorite author, so i usually prefer something a little more abstract, with confusing bits to chew over). The story is simple to follow (i've read all of George RR Martin's song of ice and fire books so far, and those books often feel like they're drowning you in details in order to hide mysteries).I can't think any part of this book where I could debate what happened, or what someone was trying to do. There were several I really dug this book. The prose is simple to follow (william gibson is my favorite author, so i usually prefer something a little more abstract, with confusing bits to chew over). The story is simple to follow (i've read all of George RR Martin's song of ice and fire books so far, and those books often feel like they're drowning you in details in order to hide mysteries).I can't think any part of this book where I could debate what happened, or what someone was trying to do. There were several bits where people wonder what a prophecy means, or suggest a dream might be symbolic, but I can't remember any of them really being ambiguous. There is even a big moment near the end where a character storms off to do violence while others wonder what their intentions are - and even though we know why they stormed off, the book still stops and has everyone talk it out afterwards to make sure everyone knows what everyone else was thinking, and clear up any confusion. So the approach to writing seems pretty simple. A book for the masses. Easy to follow. I guess there's a core prophecy that is setup in the first chapter and then left for you to chew over throughout the book. So that's cool. but i also figured what I made of it right off the bat, so it wasn't keeping me awake at night. (it'd be a lot like a prophecy that a savior will change the world. and here is satan having a kid named Damien, with 666 on his scalp and everyone wonders if he'll be a good savior. pretty quickly you've settled where you stand on that 'big mystery.' I think) That said, I really dug the pacing, tone and creativity. It moves along a good clip, with each chapter feeling like it's own little awesome fantasy moment. No fat. sometimes the book will leap many years ahead, and you feel kind of safe that it just wants to get to the next awesome sequence. So, I appreciate how many different awesome sequences the author came up with. Finally, just want to note the tone. I've been working on my own dark fantasy story, where shit is a little more gory and scary, and less political and dainty. And this book trumped me on several fronts. I love the way magic is reimagined as a sort of chaotic force (literally called "Chaos" instead of "magic"). I dug the dark imagery of a wizard covered in tattoos, adorned in special bones and skin, slurping down a sort of drug to help him connect with the "Chaos." Feel like this is much more badass than your standard fantasy fare. Anywho. I'd read Karpyshyn's mass effect books, and this has a similar feel. maybe a little TOO easy to follow. but very creative and fun ideas, so i don't regret the ride. Hope this ends up turning into a movie for video game. I'm definitely eager to read the next in this series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Pecoraro

    Children of Fire begins in the grand tradition of many of the oldest of the Fantasy Epics. In fact, in the acknowledgements at the end of the book; the author refers to many such epics as his inspirations for writing this book. The problem with this is that most of those epics were conceived and even published back in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. Many people forget that even if they have fond memories of such works from their childhoods. They don’t necessarily stand up to the modern works we have tod Children of Fire begins in the grand tradition of many of the oldest of the Fantasy Epics. In fact, in the acknowledgements at the end of the book; the author refers to many such epics as his inspirations for writing this book. The problem with this is that most of those epics were conceived and even published back in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. Many people forget that even if they have fond memories of such works from their childhoods. They don’t necessarily stand up to the modern works we have today in style or scope. The first 150 pages of this book are wasted on the birth and youth of the main characters of this book. And in my opinion, this is the most uninteresting way you could possibly begin a story. I’m not saying that nothing happens. BY FAR, this beginning is a a clear preamble laid naked at the feet of the reader. Most readers will either get incredibly bored or just try to skip ahead, “to the good part.” I soldiered through this, mostly because I felt an obligation to give the book a chance; also, because I thought that at SOME POINT, the author would skip ahead in time and bring us to the story proper. Which did happen on around the 150-170 page mark. From there on the author takes us on an interesting journey with lots of action, magic, and intrigue. Did we have to know the backstory of all these characters to care about them? No… Did we need some of the inner monologue of some of these main characters when their stories don’t even end in this volume. I wouldn’t think so… The author is truly a master of world building. The acknowledgements also say that it took him 20 years to create this world. I will be very interested to see what further books and further stories spring from this detailed and well realized vision. Once the reader gets through to about the middle of the book they are surly into the meat of a fine Fantasy Epic. I would recommend this title to any fan of the genre. I’m not sure what I would say about the first 150 pages. Except, be assured it WILL; in fact, get a whole lot better. With some clever editing on the part of the author or the editor this book would have easily achieved a 5 star rating. Also, an actual, rather than an implied promise of a sequel may have also helped the book’s case. As it stands, I truly loved half the book; which is great. Because there are many cases where I can’t even say that much.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Book Info: Genre: Epic Fantasy Reading Level: Adult Recommended for: fans of epic fantasy Trigger Warnings: zealotry, people being tortured, burned at the stake, killed; children being taken from their parents, violence, fighting, murder My Thoughts: This is an extremely complex book, as is common for epic fantasy, with lots of characters to keep track of and lots of things going on. It is also very obviously the first book in a series, as many things are left unfinished. While there is a great deal of similarity to other epic fant/>My/>Trigger/>Recommended/>Reading Book Info: Genre: Epic Fantasy Reading Level: Adult Recommended for: fans of epic fantasy Trigger Warnings: zealotry, people being tortured, burned at the stake, killed; children being taken from their parents, violence, fighting, murder My Thoughts: This is an extremely complex book, as is common for epic fantasy, with lots of characters to keep track of and lots of things going on. It is also very obviously the first book in a series, as many things are left unfinished. While there is a great deal of similarity to other epic fantasies, including a very strong homage to Lord of the Rings, at the same time this is a very unique idea and done in a new way. I think most fans of epic fantasy will quite like this story. The characters are all very interesting, if somewhat cliché at times (such as Norr's “honorable savage” and Scythe's “rogue” character). I enjoyed learning about the ideas behind the Chaos and Chaos magic. If you like epic fantasies, definitely check this one out. Disclosure: I received an e-galley from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Synopsis: Long ago the gods chose a great hero to act as their agent in the mortal world and to stand against the demonic spawn of Chaos. The gods gifted their champion, Daemron, with three magical Talismans: a sword, a ring, and a crown. But the awesome power at his command corrupted Daemron, turning him from savior to destroyer. Filled with pride, he dared to challenge the gods themselves. Siding with the Chaos spawn, Daemron waged a titanic battle against the Immortals. In the end, Daemron was defeated, the Talismans were lost, and Chaos was sealed off behind the Legacy—a magical barrier the gods sacrificed themselves to create. Now the Legacy is fading. On the other side, the banished Daemron stirs. And across the scattered corners of the land, four children are born of suffering and strife, each touched by one aspect of Daemron himself—wizard, warrior, prophet, king. Bound by a connection deeper than blood, the Children of Fire will either restore the Legacy or bring it crashing down, freeing Daemron to wreak his vengeance upon the mortal world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve Caldwell

    An excellent Fantasy story. Really original magic system, with deep world building and multiple plot lines that all run parallel and merge at the end of the book. The characters are complex, and the story has a deep back story that drives and impacts the plot. I would recommend this story to any fan of Steven Erickson or Gail Z. Martin.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Drakehou

    Ok I really like Drew Karpyshyn and I think he's doing a great job moving on from star wars. It started slow but finished strong will be getting the next one soon and can't wait for the third to come out.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charles Boyd

    not bad. I will read the next installment.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary Fan

    In a world born from Chaos, the Gods chose a hero to protect the mortal world from the demonic Chaos spawn - monsters and creatures who would destroy all life if given the chance. He was Daemron, a great king, warrior, prophet, and wizard, and he was gifted with three Talismans of power: the Crown, the Ring, and the Sword. But, corrupted by the power he wielded, Daemron rallied the Chaos spawn and betrayed the Gods, waging a great war. The Gods sacrificed themselves to defeat him, trapping In a world born from Chaos, the Gods chose a hero to protect the mortal world from the demonic Chaos spawn - monsters and creatures who would destroy all life if given the chance. He was Daemron, a great king, warrior, prophet, and wizard, and he was gifted with three Talismans of power: the Crown, the Ring, and the Sword. But, corrupted by the power he wielded, Daemron rallied the Chaos spawn and betrayed the Gods, waging a great war. The Gods sacrificed themselves to defeat him, trapping him and his monsters behind a barrier called the Legacy and scattering the Talismans across the world. Centuries later, Daemron senses that the time for his return is near, and he enacts a ritual that touches four mortals born under the Blood Moon with the essence of Chaos. Children of Fire, the first book in Drew Karpyshyn's Chaos Born trilogy, follows these four from the unusual circumstances of each of their births through the first twenty years of their lives. There's Keegan, mild-mannered and physically frail but gifted with immense magical power. There's Cassandra, who's training with the warrior monks who vow to protect the world from Daemron and Chaos at all costs. There's Scythe, a tough and quick-tempered fighter who grew up on the mean streets of a pirate harbor. Then there's Vaaler, a prince born to a kingdom that reveres magic but lacking magic of his own. And they're surrounded by a rich cast of characters from all corners of this richly developed fantasy world--fanatical monks, tribal warriors, wizards, royalty, demons, and more. The big picture goal of the story is for the protagonists to obtain the Talismans, but along the way, so, so much more happens. 512 may sound like a lot of pages, but considering how much Karpyshyn packs into this world, this book's not long at all. I sat down one Saturday to read a few chapters... and ended up sitting on my couch for a good 8 hours or so, tearing through 400 pages in one sitting. The worldbuilding is truly phenomenal -- the different civilizations and cultures, the magic system, the various powers at play... It all fits together in a way that makes this fantasy universe come to life and feel real and lived-in. You learn the history of this world bit by bit through various scenes and character revelations, so that by the time you're done with the whole trilogy (and really, you should read it back-to-back), you feel like you've lived there. Of course, the downside (as a reviewer) is that the three books are blending into one big one in my head, so some of this review might touch on points explored in later books (but no spoilers, I promise!). The book sets up the stakes right from the beginning, with the threat of Daemron's return, and as it winds its way through the lives of four characters in four different parts of the world, weaving pieces from other forces at work, the pacing never slows. It's really quite amazing how so many different story lines not only fit together, but are presented so memorably that it's easy to keep track of what's what. The plot is complex and multi-layered, but never confusing. And throughout, it kept me with the feeling of imminent danger, like each and every action these characters took, no matter how mundane-seeming, was leading toward a great destiny. This story is told from the POVs of multiple characters -- heroes, villains, and those who are in between. There are too many interesting characters for me to describe all of them in a review, so I'll stick with gushing over my top three. Scythe quickly became my favorite, with her confidence and snarkiness. Yet behind the hard exterior, there's a compassion and vulnerability she never lets the world see. She's loads of fun to read and a thrill to watch in action, and her rather skewed sense of morality makes her POV fascinating. I also found myself drawn toward Keegan's character--first when he was introduced from his father's POV as a somewhat creepy kid, and then when he starts becoming his own person, which is difficult for him since, of the four Children of Fire, he's the most aware of his destiny. Thanks to a fanatical monk's vision, he's believed to be the Savior--a role he accepts but isn't certain of. Earnest and naive, he doesn't always do the right thing, but he certainly tries (unlike Scythe, who's a survivalist and often seems amoral). Then there's Vaaler, a noble spirit who was born to royalty and works hard to be the perfect student, but, tragically, will never be good enough in the eyes of his people due to his lack of magic. An overarching presence in the book is the dark wizard Rexol, who's both creepy and mesmerizing in his arrogant, power-hungry ways (he's also the book's cover boy). He winds up interfering in the lives of three of the Children of Fire, setting them up, sometimes intentionally and sometimes not, for their ultimate destiny. There's something Tolkein-esque about the world and the overarching ideas, and yet it's also very different. For one thing, women have actual roles as heroes and villains who drive the story rather than love interests and side characters (huzzah!). And there's racial diversity too, which makes me very happy. Also, there are no deus ex machina-type easy resolutions to anything. While the forces of fate certainly are at work, nothing is simple for these characters. In fact, one of the central points of the worldbuilding is "backlash", meaning that for every spell cast, the chaotic essence of magic will cause something bad to happen. The story is also considerably darker. I've seen this book categorized as "horror" in some places, probably because of the gruesome demonic rituals, bloody battles, and the horrors of war. Evil is evil for a reason... Suffice it to say, this book was a fast-paced, gripping read that left me begging for more. Good thing I had the sequel on standby...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jamies

    Amazing Dolan Tree find! This falls into my fantasy/mystical/apocalyptic heroes wheelhouse, which I don't read too often depending on the balance of subgenres within the story. Since the names & there are time jumps, it was harder to keep straight who the 4 kids were in the beginning. Once you find out who they are all you want them to do is meet. By the end of the book SPOILER ALERT!! you get 3/4 all in one place. Couldn't make this update for a while but I've started Amazing Dolan Tree find! This falls into my fantasy/mystical/apocalyptic heroes wheelhouse, which I don't read too often depending on the balance of subgenres within the story. Since the names & there are time jumps, it was harder to keep straight who the 4 kids were in the beginning. Once you find out who they are all you want them to do is meet. By the end of the book SPOILER ALERT!! you get 3/4 all in one place. Couldn't make this update for a while but I've started the 2nd book & things are frustrating me beyond end. Good read, like that I can guess certain real world ties to different elements of the story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Children of Fire is Drew Karpyshyn’s take on an original fantasy setting filled with taboo magic, deep characters and an engrossing plot. There are no orcs, dwarves or pointy eared elves in this fantasy world. Instead it focuses on magic and how the world views it as both acceptable and heretical. From the viewpoints of four children, the story unfolds through various threats, adventures and mysteries. Drawing upon the sea of fire, a well of unfathomable magic, they must battle the forces of cha Children of Fire is Drew Karpyshyn’s take on an original fantasy setting filled with taboo magic, deep characters and an engrossing plot. There are no orcs, dwarves or pointy eared elves in this fantasy world. Instead it focuses on magic and how the world views it as both acceptable and heretical. From the viewpoints of four children, the story unfolds through various threats, adventures and mysteries. Drawing upon the sea of fire, a well of unfathomable magic, they must battle the forces of chaos to survive. Yet this is only the first part of their journey. The core of the story lies with a banished immortal named Daemron. A twisted creature who was once human and mortal, Daemron is now an exile in a world of his own creation. Separated from the mortal world by a magical barrier known as the Legacy, Daemron longs to escape from his prison. He uses a complicated ritual to seed his essence on earth. The result is four children born under the Blood Moon. These four children become the main characters of the story: Vaaler, Scythe, Cassandra and Keegan. Vaaler is a member of the Tree Folk. In this world, they are the equivalent to elves. The Tree Folk live in the Northern Forest of Danaan. They have brownish green skin and a natural affinity for magic. Vaaler is the crown prince of his people, destined to one day rule their empire. But Vaaler has a problem: he was born without the Gift and the Sight. Unable to perform magic or see into the future, he is seen as handicapped. Before him is an upward battle to earn the right to rule and to earn the respect of his mother, the Queen. Scythe represents the opposite end of the spectrum. Born in a brothel and raised by a doctor who flees to the safety of the ocean, she learns a very different way of life. Scythe is very independent. She learns how to live on her own, how to survive on the streets, and how cruel life can be. Her destiny leads to a life of adventure. She goes where the actions at. Without any aptitude for magic, she has to rely on her own talents. Cassandra is the beautiful blond with emerald eyes and gifted with the touch of Chaos. The Sight is strong with her. Alas, life is not so kind. Kidnapped and raised by a rogue wizard, Cassandra grows up with only the vaguest memories of her parents. Even then, there is no stability for her as she is threatened by the Order, a monastic group that represses magic and forcefully takes any children gifted with Chaos magic. Keegan is the most powerful of the bunch. Skilled with both the Sight and the Gift, his raw talent for magic is unprecedented. Like Cassandra, he’s raised by a wizard, but his training is never fully completed. Thrown into the world half trained and brimming with destructive potential, he falls in with a heretic named Jerrod. Jerrod claims Keegan is the Burning Savior, the one destined to defeat the Slayer Daemron. But Jerrod is a fanatic who has fallen onto his last hope. Keegan may be powerful, but is he really the savior? The story follows the lives of these characters from their births to their early adulthood. It shows their trials and tribulations, and some of them even cross paths. There are other characters who play large parts such as the Pontiff Nazir who leads the Order, the powerful Chaos mage named Rexol, and Daemron himself. Karpyshyn does a great job of developing all the characters slowly. Here and there we get glimpses of just what kind of people these characters are. He stays away from simple good and evil archetypes. All of the characters have their flaws. Some of them are more good than evil. Others are more flawed than perfect. The world they inhabit is one with a rich history, which, like the characters themselves, is slowly revealed here and there. The pacing and content of the book created an engrossing story that’s easy to dive into and hard to leave. As a fantasy story, Children of Fire stands on its own as a thoroughly entertaining tale. The book strikes a perfect balance between character driven storytelling and rich world building. In comparison to Drew’s Star Wars books, this one stands on par with the best elements of his Darth Bane series. But this isn’t Star Wars and Drew doesn’t hold back in his storytelling. In this world, Chaos magic is a dangerous thing that can as easily destroy your foe as it can yourself. With two more books to follow, Children of Fire kicks the series off with a great start. I give this book an impressive five out of five.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    In the beginning, there were a lot of different story lines and characters coming at me that it was hard to keep them all straight. So to be honest, I did not put forth as much effort in the beginning to remembering all of the characters or the book as a whole. I sort of skimmed over the book to get to the section where the action started. Which when I say action I mean the pacing of the story and when it picked up speed for me. This was not until about chapter ten. There was some action with th In the beginning, there were a lot of different story lines and characters coming at me that it was hard to keep them all straight. So to be honest, I did not put forth as much effort in the beginning to remembering all of the characters or the book as a whole. I sort of skimmed over the book to get to the section where the action started. Which when I say action I mean the pacing of the story and when it picked up speed for me. This was not until about chapter ten. There was some action with the children using their special abilities but since this is the first book, the author took his time to really give details to the characters, where they come from, and what they are fighting for. Again I am for detail but there is a fine line when it becomes too much, especially when a book is about five hundred pages long. If you are expecting a sci-fi book than you might be a little disappointed. This book I found to be more about the story telling than about the unexplainable or crazy, special effects. There is something here that might have me checking out the second book but I would probably borrow it from the library instead.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miriah Isel

    Children of Fire is a fantasy novel portraying the plight of four children and accounting for their lives as they grow and mature-- all in different walks of life. I haven't read a decent fantasy in a good while for the simple fact that I primarily read Science Fiction Novels so for me this was a good break from my norm and I enjoyed every page of the book. There were times where I was conflicted if I wanted to put the book down from the weight of the character's situation or did I want t Children of Fire is a fantasy novel portraying the plight of four children and accounting for their lives as they grow and mature-- all in different walks of life. I haven't read a decent fantasy in a good while for the simple fact that I primarily read Science Fiction Novels so for me this was a good break from my norm and I enjoyed every page of the book. There were times where I was conflicted if I wanted to put the book down from the weight of the character's situation or did I want to continue on to find out how they would push through the obstacle. Now that I have finished the novel, I am anxious to see what is next.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Smith

    I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads. I ejoyed reading this book so much! But the closer I got to the end, it made me realize that I was not going to find out what happens to Keegan and his troop. Oh, what a disappointment! Excellently written, with great characters. I want to find out what happens to Cassandra, Norr and Scythe, Jerrod and Vaaler. The monsters and demons are very believeable, and the story is simply great! Will the Queen join with the demons? Will Keegan le I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads. I ejoyed reading this book so much! But the closer I got to the end, it made me realize that I was not going to find out what happens to Keegan and his troop. Oh, what a disappointment! Excellently written, with great characters. I want to find out what happens to Cassandra, Norr and Scythe, Jerrod and Vaaler. The monsters and demons are very believeable, and the story is simply great! Will the Queen join with the demons? Will Keegan learn to control his gift? Will Cassandra survive and what will happen to the Crown? And they haven't even found the Sword yet! I have got to find the next book!!!! RECOMMENDED!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Bice

    this book reminds me of the video game dragon age which is great since I happen to enjoy that game. Now the author works for bio-ware as a writer of some short but im not sure if he was work on it. This is his first original fantasy novel and he did a great job. Its not what some people would call epic fantasy but its with sword and magic. he does all the main character really well keegan and cassandra are my favorite. This is the type of fantasy that has a lot of great action. If you like the t this book reminds me of the video game dragon age which is great since I happen to enjoy that game. Now the author works for bio-ware as a writer of some short but im not sure if he was work on it. This is his first original fantasy novel and he did a great job. Its not what some people would call epic fantasy but its with sword and magic. he does all the main character really well keegan and cassandra are my favorite. This is the type of fantasy that has a lot of great action. If you like the travelers gate series then you will like this one as well. I look forward to the next novel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Gutierrez

    I loved it, confusing at first but worth wading through the seperate stories to see the beginnings of the characters. I personally like how the flow of the story went because next book we will see more action and we have characters with flaws. Nothing speaks so well as broken people finding the way. Lets be honest if they were perfect this would of sucked but they arent. They all are broken and its beautiful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Quick, readable, standard fantasy. I'm always on the hunt for a nice fantasy series, and this fit the bill. There's nothing really outstanding or novel about the plot or magic system, but the author did do a great job of building his world and writing interesting, if standard, characters to populate it. I did like the characters, and look forward to following them, and if the author comes up with any surprises along the way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zach Cole

    Children of fire is one of the best original stories I've read yet. I've always been a fan of Drew's work, and I'm so glad he started his own series. The blind monks with the supernatural vision remind me of blind Force users from Star Wars, which I find entertaining. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a new series to start, or any fan of fantasy books.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Frank Mccann jr.

    I had won this book on here and got an advanced unproofed edition.i started reading the book about a week before i posted it on here.This book was really good, for me it was slow reading in the beginning with having 4 different main characters but once the characters started coming together it got very exciting and i cant wait to read the second book when it comes out

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leon Aldrich

    Rating somewhere between 4 - 4.5. Not quite as awesome as Brent Weeks or Peter Brett. That may just be me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Srail

    This book was utterly fantastic. Highly recommended for those who love this genre. This is how the Dragon Age books should have been written.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    Loved the book. It was great reading about how the different characters storylines came together. Can't wait to read the next book in the series.

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