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The Fighting Kukri: Illustrated Lessons on the Gurkha Combat Knife

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The kukri is one of the oldest combat/utility knives in existence today. Recognized as the national weapon of Nepal, the kukri has been associated with the British Army's fearsome Gurkha brigades since their creation. The unique downward slope of the blade gives the kukri its distinctive look and renowned ability to effect powerful, accurate cuts. In this latest addition to The kukri is one of the oldest combat/utility knives in existence today. Recognized as the national weapon of Nepal, the kukri has been associated with the British Army's fearsome Gurkha brigades since their creation. The unique downward slope of the blade gives the kukri its distinctive look and renowned ability to effect powerful, accurate cuts. In this latest addition to his "Fighting Weapons" series, Dwight McLemore explores the full range of kukri training and deployment. He presents a sprinkling of history with informed discussions of fighting approaches and numerous training exercises on cutting, thrusting, blocking, and the associated movement of a kukri fight. By mixing modern and historical concepts and illustrating the text with hundreds of his highly acclaimed instructional drawings, McLemore has created the first and perhaps ultimate training guide to this unique weapon. The Fighting Kukri is a must for martial artists, blade enthusiasts, historical reenactors, fight directors of stage and screen, and men and women of the armed forces.


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The kukri is one of the oldest combat/utility knives in existence today. Recognized as the national weapon of Nepal, the kukri has been associated with the British Army's fearsome Gurkha brigades since their creation. The unique downward slope of the blade gives the kukri its distinctive look and renowned ability to effect powerful, accurate cuts. In this latest addition to The kukri is one of the oldest combat/utility knives in existence today. Recognized as the national weapon of Nepal, the kukri has been associated with the British Army's fearsome Gurkha brigades since their creation. The unique downward slope of the blade gives the kukri its distinctive look and renowned ability to effect powerful, accurate cuts. In this latest addition to his "Fighting Weapons" series, Dwight McLemore explores the full range of kukri training and deployment. He presents a sprinkling of history with informed discussions of fighting approaches and numerous training exercises on cutting, thrusting, blocking, and the associated movement of a kukri fight. By mixing modern and historical concepts and illustrating the text with hundreds of his highly acclaimed instructional drawings, McLemore has created the first and perhaps ultimate training guide to this unique weapon. The Fighting Kukri is a must for martial artists, blade enthusiasts, historical reenactors, fight directors of stage and screen, and men and women of the armed forces.

33 review for The Fighting Kukri: Illustrated Lessons on the Gurkha Combat Knife

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jasprit Sing

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The book seems to be good want to read it

  2. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Nichols

    I've never read a McLemore book before, but I've owned a kukri since I was a kid (and used it regularly -- great field knife!), so this seemed a good place to start. It's a truism that you can't learn martial arts from a book --- you learn from practice. But a book can inform your practice, and in terms of ability to do so, this is one of the best martial arts books I've ever read. The progression of material made sense, the illustrations were plentiful, on point, and from useful angles, and the I've never read a McLemore book before, but I've owned a kukri since I was a kid (and used it regularly -- great field knife!), so this seemed a good place to start. It's a truism that you can't learn martial arts from a book --- you learn from practice. But a book can inform your practice, and in terms of ability to do so, this is one of the best martial arts books I've ever read. The progression of material made sense, the illustrations were plentiful, on point, and from useful angles, and the text was invariably brief and clear. McLemore clearly knows his business -- he could have a good career designing instructional manuals for other people's material if he felt like it. An absolute joy to read, and if I ever write a martial arts book, I'll be modeling it after this one. The material itself...well, McLemore works off a fundamentally different movement base than I do, so while there's a couple of tricks I might steal, that's about it for me. But there's nothing wrong with the material; it's just not compatible with my practice. I feel a need to also mention McLemore's use of and interaction with other people's material. He gives credit where due and is uniformly respectful, while at the same time being careful to stand behind what he presents as *his* interpretation and application. He strikes a wonderful balance, and I wish more authors followed his example. One chapter is based (in part) on three Serak jurus, and since this is something I have a more than passing acquaintance with, I want to speak to it. I don't see much resemblance to Serak as I understand it. I don't mean this at all as a criticism of McLemore -- he interacted with the material and made it his own, and he is clear that this is what he has done. Nothing wrong with that. But if you thought you were getting a quick window into what Serak is like...not from this. Maybe get your hands on Stevan Plinck's knife compilation DVD.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miroku Nemeth

    As the author states repeatedly, the practical knowledge that is in this book can only be accessed through real training. The drawings, diagrams, descriptions, etc. are good, but, like most books on martial arts techniques, you really can only benefit from them to the point of implementation if you train hard in those techniques and make them your own. For myself, I have trained over seven years in Doce Pares Eskrima, as well as training in many other martial arts since I was 12, so I was able t As the author states repeatedly, the practical knowledge that is in this book can only be accessed through real training. The drawings, diagrams, descriptions, etc. are good, but, like most books on martial arts techniques, you really can only benefit from them to the point of implementation if you train hard in those techniques and make them your own. For myself, I have trained over seven years in Doce Pares Eskrima, as well as training in many other martial arts since I was 12, so I was able to gain great benefit from this book, and I was able to appreciate the years of training and research that the author undertook to be able to write on this in such a fashion. As I read it, I was able to feel the moves as I have used them—and even though none of the moves were attributed to Eskrima, most of them were in our system. Perhaps the numerado was different, but we had the strikes. It was a very useful read for the martial artist interested in blade combat, and was very comprehensive. Mr. MacLemore has done all of us a service in this work, truly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Adams

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zdozier

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dean Freidline

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Moore

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Moffatt

  10. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sean Mark Hinkle

  12. 4 out of 5

    federico

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gernot Redondo

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve Scott

  15. 5 out of 5

    Folke

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  17. 5 out of 5

    Atacanahu

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Good

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Davis

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jorge

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bailey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Philip Moore

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Byrd

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ye Min

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel Ogolo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Burnham

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bašák Bašiak

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Johnson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Plath

  31. 4 out of 5

    Frank Harris

  32. 4 out of 5

    Luis Hernandez Galindo

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jay Winborn

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