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HTML5 Cookbook

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With scores of practical recipes you can use in your projects right away, this cookbook helps you gain hands-on experience with HTML5’s versatile collection of elements. You get clear solutions for handling issues with everything from markup semantics, web forms, and audio and video elements to related technologies such as geolocation and rich JavaScript APIs. E With scores of practical recipes you can use in your projects right away, this cookbook helps you gain hands-on experience with HTML5’s versatile collection of elements. You get clear solutions for handling issues with everything from markup semantics, web forms, and audio and video elements to related technologies such as geolocation and rich JavaScript APIs. Each informative recipe includes sample code and a detailed discussion on why and how the solution works. Perfect for intermediate to advanced web and mobile web developers, this handy book lets you choose the HTML5 features that work for you—and helps you experiment with the rest. Test browsers for HTML5 support, and use techniques for applying unsupported features Discover how HTML5 makes web form implementation much simpler Overcome challenges for implementing native audio and video elements Learn techniques for using HTML5 with ARIA accessibility guidelines Explore examples that cover using geolocation data in your applications Draw images, use transparencies, add gradients and patterns, and more with Canvas Bring HTML5 features to life with a variety of advanced JavaScript APIs


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With scores of practical recipes you can use in your projects right away, this cookbook helps you gain hands-on experience with HTML5’s versatile collection of elements. You get clear solutions for handling issues with everything from markup semantics, web forms, and audio and video elements to related technologies such as geolocation and rich JavaScript APIs. E With scores of practical recipes you can use in your projects right away, this cookbook helps you gain hands-on experience with HTML5’s versatile collection of elements. You get clear solutions for handling issues with everything from markup semantics, web forms, and audio and video elements to related technologies such as geolocation and rich JavaScript APIs. Each informative recipe includes sample code and a detailed discussion on why and how the solution works. Perfect for intermediate to advanced web and mobile web developers, this handy book lets you choose the HTML5 features that work for you—and helps you experiment with the rest. Test browsers for HTML5 support, and use techniques for applying unsupported features Discover how HTML5 makes web form implementation much simpler Overcome challenges for implementing native audio and video elements Learn techniques for using HTML5 with ARIA accessibility guidelines Explore examples that cover using geolocation data in your applications Draw images, use transparencies, add gradients and patterns, and more with Canvas Bring HTML5 features to life with a variety of advanced JavaScript APIs

30 review for HTML5 Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I can easily peg this book as a must-read for web designers and developers who wants to learn what HTML5 is and how to best use it. The HTML5 Cookbook is written in a Problem-Solution-Discussion pattern for each of its segments on a particular HTML5 feature, with plenty of references to external websites for more information and discussion. The segments are grouped in chapters that start with the most simple and common HTML features, to the most complex. Here's a summary of each chapter, with my I can easily peg this book as a must-read for web designers and developers who wants to learn what HTML5 is and how to best use it. The HTML5 Cookbook is written in a Problem-Solution-Discussion pattern for each of its segments on a particular HTML5 feature, with plenty of references to external websites for more information and discussion. The segments are grouped in chapters that start with the most simple and common HTML features, to the most complex. Here's a summary of each chapter, with my review and take-away for them: Chapter 1: Fundamental Syntax and Semantics This chapter focuses on the new tags and changes to existing tags in the HTML5 specification, like modifications to the doctype, script and link tags, and introducing nav, header, and footer tags. There are dozens of these, and the Cookbook lists them individually, with concise descriptions for each item. Even though I was already familiar with most of the new tags and changes to syntax HTML5 provides, this chapter gave a lot of new information and insight about each one - the Cookbook cleared up some confusion I’ve had about the new article tag and section tag, and clarified how the HTML5 specification will affect accessibility and SEO. Chapter 2: Progressive Markup and Techniques This chapter explores more on semantics, markup styles, and browser compatibility. The discussion segments brings up Javascript fallbacks when a HTML5 feature isn’t supported by a user’s browser, and tools for analyzing your markup. Chapter 3: Forms HTML5 makes life easier for coding up forms, though many of these changes isn’t fully supported yet. This chapter goes over the new form features and each features current support (at the time of the publication, at least), and for several features, screenshots on how they will appear in each major browser. Honestly, in my studies in web design, I’ve skipped over the chapters or blog posts on HTML forms. I’ve found that subject to be complicated and boring. Though, the Cookbook’s chapter on HTML5 forms made the subject considerably more informative and digestible. Many of the new form features even look fun to experiment with, though the lack of browser support would mean it’ll be some time before I could safely use them in a practical website. Chapter 4: Native Audio Here, the Cookbook finally gets to a newly introduced HTML tag; . This chapter covers how the tag works, what audio files browsers recognize, attributes and functions that the audio tag uses, and related best practices tips. This is also the chapter where Javascript is first used in the Cookbook for enhancing and expanding the HTML5 functionality. Native audio is one of the biggest of the new HTML5 features, and one of the least supported by the big browsers. The Cookbook does a satisfactory job of pointing out this, explaining it, and comparing which browsers does and doesn’t support them (at the book’s publication, at least). It was at this chapter that I’ve started having trouble with this book - the author throws out snippets of Javascript to use, apparently assuming the reader is already very familiar with reading Javascript and experienced with implementing it. I’m not, so I didn’t understand what the Javascript was supposed to be doing. Chapter 5: Native Video This chapter is essentially the same as the previous chapter, but covering the tag. The attribute syntax between and is very similar, but there’s still enough differences in functionaliy and support. The Cookbook does a good job with covering the features, uses, and support, like with chapter 4. Chapter 6: Microdata and Custom Data This chapter begins with a brief description and history of microformats and microdata - tag attributes and information for defining the content within them, for use with search engines and other systems. The recipe sections here introduces the “item” and “data” attributes, their uses, and some Javascript functions to make them useful in some applications. The concept of microdata and custom data was pretty new to me, though I don’t feel that I got a complete understanding of them through this chapter. The Cookbook was clear on what they are now for HTML5 (somewhat), though not as much as the whole picture of microdata. However, the chapter didn’t try to do that; instead relying on it’s nudging the reader to read more about it on Schema.org; a website the Cookbook referenced throughout the chapter. Chapter 7: Accessibility Web accessibility is a big and growing issue in web design, and this chapter covers how the HTML5 specification expands on existing tag attributes, like the “alt” for image tags, and introduces new attributes for making web accessibility easier to implement and accessibility tools more effective. Chapter 8: Geolocation Finally getting to the more hyped features of HTML5, this chapter goes over the geolocation API. The chapter focuses on implementing geolocation with jQuery, incorporating fallbacks when there isn’t browser support, how to get different location results, and working with Google Maps. I had more of an issue understanding this chapter, as it threw out a lot more Javascript and jQuery than previous chapters. Granted, I’m not too concerned with learning how to use geolocation like the other HTML5 features, though I hope that as the HTML5 specification finalizes, it would rely less on complicated Javascript/jQuery tricks. Chapter 9: The other highly anticipated HTML5 feature is the canvas element. This chapter had many segments about the different effects to use with the canvas element, like drawing, transparency, animating, inserting images, and a few others. Honestly, this was the chapter I was the least invested in, as the Cookbook basically described the canvas element as being a simple, in-browser vectoring program, that uses code to draw. I’m a creative person who’ve already learned how to use Adobe Illustrator to great effect. I don’t see how I’d want to know how to use the canvas element to do what Illustrator can do. I don’t think the Cookbook have gone far enough to show how awesome the canvas element is supposed to be. Chapter 10: Advanced HTML5 Javascript The final chapter briefly goes over the other new HTML5 APIs and features, like local storage, app caching, drag and drop, and browser history manipulation. Each of the different APIs and features brought up in this chapter only gets one “recipe” to explain its use and implementation. Though the one section they get was very informative and well spelled out, I was surprised that some of the features (like the drag and drop API) only got one section to explain them. Then again, I don’t currently have an interest or a use in these features at this time, so I wouldn’t know if I needed more recipes to flesh out my understanding of them. All in all, this book is a great must-read. It clarified many things about the new semantic tags, though it didn’t seem like it shone enough light on the varied capabilities of the new APIs, like geolocation, canvas, and drag and drop. This book was geared toward people who’s interested, but know very little of HTML5. However, this book assumes the reader is already experienced in HTML and some scripting, so it’s going to be over the heads of complete beginners.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Will

    A good book. Well-written with helpful examples. It looks like they tried to make things a lot better with HTML5. The book does a great job of explaining HTML5 features. It presents everything in the form of a problem and a solution. It shows features that are widely supported, features that are supported by some browsers, and features that aren't supported by any browsers yet. You get workarounds for pretty much every feature just in case the user is using a browser that doesn't supp A good book. Well-written with helpful examples. It looks like they tried to make things a lot better with HTML5. The book does a great job of explaining HTML5 features. It presents everything in the form of a problem and a solution. It shows features that are widely supported, features that are supported by some browsers, and features that aren't supported by any browsers yet. You get workarounds for pretty much every feature just in case the user is using a browser that doesn't support the feature.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ezequiel Delpero

    muy buen libro para largarse con HTML5

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    A must-have for web designers, developers and webmasters.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rahul

  6. 5 out of 5

    John

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karthikeyan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Badawy

  9. 4 out of 5

    William Högman

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sunhill

  11. 5 out of 5

    Raluca

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thevioletmaniac

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jascha

  14. 5 out of 5

    Geri Cookie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Craig

  16. 5 out of 5

    Judit Hummel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rafael

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacky Ho

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tracy E.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Holyman

    Good but not suitable to study for an exam ...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rainer Spittel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julio Sueiras

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jad Dawkins

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan Carpenter

  27. 4 out of 5

    Phil McGill

  28. 4 out of 5

    Valeria Lettieri

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  30. 4 out of 5

    Franklin

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