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The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook: 150 Delightful, Delicious, and Darn-Near Foolproof Recipes from Two Top Wilderness Chefs

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Imagine this: You're at a campsite 10,000 feet up in the Third Mono Creek Recess of the high Sierras. You have no refrigerator, no food processor, no non-stick cookware, no measuring spoons, no pepper mill, no sea salt. How are you going to cook a meal that is imaginative, delightful, and delicious? That's what The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook is all about.Rick Imagine this: You're at a campsite 10,000 feet up in the Third Mono Creek Recess of the high Sierras. You have no refrigerator, no food processor, no non-stick cookware, no measuring spoons, no pepper mill, no sea salt. How are you going to cook a meal that is imaginative, delightful, and delicious? That's what The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook is all about.Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn show anyone who loves the outdoors how to make homemade pizza, braid challah, wrap poached trout in a sushi roll, and even make dumplings for Chinese dim sum at their campsite. Campers who have never cooked anything more complicated than s'mores might feel uncertain about tackling chocolate mousse in the wild, but Greenspan and Kahn have three decades of experience teaching camp-out cooking. "We've taught people who could barely boil water," they say. And they are reassuring about trailside mishaps. If your grilled trout falls into the fire, take it out, brush off the ash, and rename the dish Cajun Blackened Trout. If the eggs break in their plastic container, make a dinner of crépes, huevos rancheros, and a cake. "The point of wilderness cooking is to have fun," say Greenspan and Kahn, "not worry if the Académie Française is looking over your shoulder." You'll find recipes for soups and stews; fruit, vegetable, and tofu dishes; pilafs, risottos, and polenta; pasta, noodles, and dumplings; sauces and schmeers (that's Yiddish for spreads); pancakes, crépes, and soufflés; pizza and quiche. An entire chapter is devoted to trout, and the book even includes a recipe for chocolate cake. There are instructions and tips for all sorts of of cooking techniques, including dehydrating, baking in coals or on a camping stove, grilling, frying, and steaming. And several pages are devoted to trip planning: how much food to bring, what to look for in a camp stove, how long you can expect your cooking fuel to last. This book is perfect for car campers, backpackers, bikers, canoeists, tail-gaters, and day picnickers who want good food to be part of the outdoor experience


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Imagine this: You're at a campsite 10,000 feet up in the Third Mono Creek Recess of the high Sierras. You have no refrigerator, no food processor, no non-stick cookware, no measuring spoons, no pepper mill, no sea salt. How are you going to cook a meal that is imaginative, delightful, and delicious? That's what The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook is all about.Rick Imagine this: You're at a campsite 10,000 feet up in the Third Mono Creek Recess of the high Sierras. You have no refrigerator, no food processor, no non-stick cookware, no measuring spoons, no pepper mill, no sea salt. How are you going to cook a meal that is imaginative, delightful, and delicious? That's what The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook is all about.Rick Greenspan and Hal Kahn show anyone who loves the outdoors how to make homemade pizza, braid challah, wrap poached trout in a sushi roll, and even make dumplings for Chinese dim sum at their campsite. Campers who have never cooked anything more complicated than s'mores might feel uncertain about tackling chocolate mousse in the wild, but Greenspan and Kahn have three decades of experience teaching camp-out cooking. "We've taught people who could barely boil water," they say. And they are reassuring about trailside mishaps. If your grilled trout falls into the fire, take it out, brush off the ash, and rename the dish Cajun Blackened Trout. If the eggs break in their plastic container, make a dinner of crépes, huevos rancheros, and a cake. "The point of wilderness cooking is to have fun," say Greenspan and Kahn, "not worry if the Académie Française is looking over your shoulder." You'll find recipes for soups and stews; fruit, vegetable, and tofu dishes; pilafs, risottos, and polenta; pasta, noodles, and dumplings; sauces and schmeers (that's Yiddish for spreads); pancakes, crépes, and soufflés; pizza and quiche. An entire chapter is devoted to trout, and the book even includes a recipe for chocolate cake. There are instructions and tips for all sorts of of cooking techniques, including dehydrating, baking in coals or on a camping stove, grilling, frying, and steaming. And several pages are devoted to trip planning: how much food to bring, what to look for in a camp stove, how long you can expect your cooking fuel to last. This book is perfect for car campers, backpackers, bikers, canoeists, tail-gaters, and day picnickers who want good food to be part of the outdoor experience

33 review for The Leave-No-Crumbs Camping Cookbook: 150 Delightful, Delicious, and Darn-Near Foolproof Recipes from Two Top Wilderness Chefs

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Gurri

    Most of these recipes require a food dehydrator for the final steps between at home cooking and camp cooking. However, I have found a great pad thai recipe and a few other goodies to spice up the grown ups trail grub beyond peanut butter and raman noodles. This book is also making me wonder once again if maybe we are ready for a food dehydrator. I'm always on the fence. Maybe when the kids aren't as picky.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mellie B

    Great book. As with virtually all my cookbooks and recipes, I tend to modify, and this book lends itself well to that. Nowadays I use it mainly for reference in meal trip planning, but it has helped me not only expand my backpacking meals repertoire, but also help me achieve a fabulous familiarity with my food dehydrator.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Great recipes for the gourmet camper and hiker! I can't admit to having tried any of them because so many require a dehydrator AND camping season has only just started here. I am eyeing the chocolate cake recipe though for our next trip. When the kids are grown up these are definitely recipes we will put to use. Until then, I'm afraid it's hotdogs.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Tuckness

    Fascinating read about how to make gourmet meals for backpacking trips, both by making ahead and dehydrating, and cooking while in the back country. Not quite what I needed for car camping with kids, but interesting nonetheless!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eric Moe

  6. 5 out of 5

    Noel Fiems

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    Tara Franz

  8. 4 out of 5

    Todd Needham

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    Melanie Ballard

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    Janine M Vose

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pauline

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    David

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    Lisa Irwin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Denise W

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Becky

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    Daphne

  20. 5 out of 5

    Keith Veeder

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    Josh Randall

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kamran

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    Vivian

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    Impy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Haught

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    Chris

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    Almare

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca King

  31. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

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