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Education

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Art's recent "educational turn" is viewed within a wider-ranging narrative of alternative ideas of education through art. This book will be an original and indispensable resource for all who believe in the importance of art in the wider educational realm. Framing the recent "educational turn" in the arts within a broad historical and social context, this anthology raises Art's recent "educational turn" is viewed within a wider-ranging narrative of alternative ideas of education through art. This book will be an original and indispensable resource for all who believe in the importance of art in the wider educational realm. Framing the recent "educational turn" in the arts within a broad historical and social context, this anthology raises fundamental questions about how and what should be taught in an era of distributive rather than media-based practices. Among the many sources and arguments traced here is second-wave feminism, which questioned dominant notions of personal and institutional freedom as enacted through art teaching and practice. Similarly, education-based responses by the art community to the catastrophes of World War II and postcolonial conflict critically inform contemporary art confronting the interrelationships of education, power, market capitalism, and--as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri describe it--the global condition of war. These writings by artists, philosophers, educators, poets, and activists center on three recurring and interrelated themes: the notion of "indiscipline" in theories and practices that challenge boundaries of all kinds; the present and future role of the art school; and the turn to pedagogy as medium in a diverse range of recent projects. Other writings address such issues as instrumentalism and control, liberation and equality, the production and the politics of culture, and the roots of research-based practice and experimental participatory works.


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Art's recent "educational turn" is viewed within a wider-ranging narrative of alternative ideas of education through art. This book will be an original and indispensable resource for all who believe in the importance of art in the wider educational realm. Framing the recent "educational turn" in the arts within a broad historical and social context, this anthology raises Art's recent "educational turn" is viewed within a wider-ranging narrative of alternative ideas of education through art. This book will be an original and indispensable resource for all who believe in the importance of art in the wider educational realm. Framing the recent "educational turn" in the arts within a broad historical and social context, this anthology raises fundamental questions about how and what should be taught in an era of distributive rather than media-based practices. Among the many sources and arguments traced here is second-wave feminism, which questioned dominant notions of personal and institutional freedom as enacted through art teaching and practice. Similarly, education-based responses by the art community to the catastrophes of World War II and postcolonial conflict critically inform contemporary art confronting the interrelationships of education, power, market capitalism, and--as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri describe it--the global condition of war. These writings by artists, philosophers, educators, poets, and activists center on three recurring and interrelated themes: the notion of "indiscipline" in theories and practices that challenge boundaries of all kinds; the present and future role of the art school; and the turn to pedagogy as medium in a diverse range of recent projects. Other writings address such issues as instrumentalism and control, liberation and equality, the production and the politics of culture, and the roots of research-based practice and experimental participatory works.

50 review for Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    sam howie

    A great resource, hands down, my only complaint is that it needs more pages. Too much crammed editing. This series of books has a set number of pages for each book and with this edition, I didn't feel it was enough. While Thierry de Duve is rightly given a generous amount of pages for this type of publication, trying to reduce John Dewey's work in art education to 1 & 1/2 pages just seems wrong.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    An acceptable collection of essays and excerpts from artists' writings on the intersection of education and contemporary art. I'm still trying to figure out how I feel about it. It's not as good as other books in the MIT/Whitechapel "Documents of Contemporary Art" series ( Participation and Sound are mind-blowing), but has its bright spots. The excerpt from Virginia Woolf is gorgeous.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrea M. Jandernoa

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kleer Tali

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mónica Raleiras

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ksenia

  10. 4 out of 5

    Middlethought

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eléna

  12. 5 out of 5

    Derek Fenner

  13. 4 out of 5

    Louise Lazzari

  14. 5 out of 5

    mco.joe

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  16. 4 out of 5

    Justin M. Kass

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maarin Mürk

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meaghen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Toryn Green

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Shelley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Noa Yanai

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bracari.iris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nerys

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kevin McDonagh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate Adams

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Teh

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

  31. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  32. 5 out of 5

    Korri

  33. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  34. 4 out of 5

    E_bonez

  35. 4 out of 5

    John Marshall

  36. 4 out of 5

    Šarūnas

  37. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  38. 5 out of 5

    Julia Gualtieri

  39. 5 out of 5

    Beccah

  40. 5 out of 5

    Sam Friedland

  41. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  42. 5 out of 5

    Anita Baião

  43. 5 out of 5

    Manny

  44. 4 out of 5

    Connelly Library

  45. 4 out of 5

    Ana Sol

  46. 5 out of 5

    Evan

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jean Ann

  48. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  49. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  50. 4 out of 5

    Ben Pranger

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