Hot Best Seller

Coffee is Good for You: From Vitamin C and Organic Foods to Low-Carb and Detox Diets, the Truth about Di et and Nutrition Claims

Availability: Ready to download

Though food is supposed to be one of life's simple pleasures, few things cause more angst and confusion. Every day we are bombarded with come-ons for the latest diet, promises for "clinically proven" miracle ingredients, and warnings about contaminants in our favorite foods. It's enough to give anybody indigestion.Packed with useful-and surprising-information, Coffee Is Though food is supposed to be one of life's simple pleasures, few things cause more angst and confusion. Every day we are bombarded with come-ons for the latest diet, promises for "clinically proven" miracle ingredients, and warnings about contaminants in our favorite foods. It's enough to give anybody indigestion.Packed with useful-and surprising-information, Coffee Is Good for You cuts through the clutter to reveal what's believable and what's not in a fun and easily digestible way. You'll find out: Locally grown produce isn't necessarily more healthful than fruits and vegetables from across the globe Alcohol does cause breast cancer You don't need eight glasses of water a day for good health Milk isn't necessary for strong bones Oatmeal really can lower cholesterol Sea salt isn't more healthful than regular salt Low-fat cookies may be worse for you than high-fat cheese


Compare

Though food is supposed to be one of life's simple pleasures, few things cause more angst and confusion. Every day we are bombarded with come-ons for the latest diet, promises for "clinically proven" miracle ingredients, and warnings about contaminants in our favorite foods. It's enough to give anybody indigestion.Packed with useful-and surprising-information, Coffee Is Though food is supposed to be one of life's simple pleasures, few things cause more angst and confusion. Every day we are bombarded with come-ons for the latest diet, promises for "clinically proven" miracle ingredients, and warnings about contaminants in our favorite foods. It's enough to give anybody indigestion.Packed with useful-and surprising-information, Coffee Is Good for You cuts through the clutter to reveal what's believable and what's not in a fun and easily digestible way. You'll find out: Locally grown produce isn't necessarily more healthful than fruits and vegetables from across the globe Alcohol does cause breast cancer You don't need eight glasses of water a day for good health Milk isn't necessary for strong bones Oatmeal really can lower cholesterol Sea salt isn't more healthful than regular salt Low-fat cookies may be worse for you than high-fat cheese

30 review for Coffee is Good for You: From Vitamin C and Organic Foods to Low-Carb and Detox Diets, the Truth about Di et and Nutrition Claims

  1. 5 out of 5

    Monica Albright

    Yep...everything that is good for you is bad...everything bad for you is good....what to do...this was a quick and interesting read...but do I believe it??? Don't know, because it may change tomorrow.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    **Nutrition fact vs. fiction** One day you hear that [insert your favorite food here] is good for you, and you find yourself enjoying it even that much more. But, then the next day, the headlines scream that [insert your favorite food here] is bad, and you really need to avoid it at all costs. (??!!??) Sound familiar? Want some guidance navigating the nutrition fact-vs-fiction maze? If so, you’ll likely eat up this nutrition-packed book. Based on the relevant research from a healthy serving of **Nutrition fact vs. fiction** One day you hear that [insert your favorite food here] is good for you, and you find yourself enjoying it even that much more. But, then the next day, the headlines scream that [insert your favorite food here] is bad, and you really need to avoid it at all costs. (??!!??) Sound familiar? Want some guidance navigating the nutrition fact-vs-fiction maze? If so, you’ll likely eat up this nutrition-packed book. Based on the relevant research from a healthy serving of nutrition science references (“It’s as well-referenced as most medical school textbooks,” raves reviewer Dr. Nancy Snyderman), the book reviews 65 nutritional claims and gives each a “truth scale” label of: Inconclusive, No, Half-True, or Yes. Before reading the book, see if you can guess which label applies to each of the following groups: Group 1: --Alcohol causes breast cancer --Cranberry juice prevents urinary infections --Fish oil prevents heart disease --Nuts prevent heart attacks --Trans fats are harmful --Oats lower cholesterol --Red meat is bad for you --Well-done meat causes cancer --Dairy products cause cancer --Niacin improves cholesterol levels --Antioxidants are good for your eyes --Bagged salad should be washed --A Mediterranean diet is good for you --Diets high in watery foods help you lose weight Group 2: --Green tea promotes weight loss --Butter is more healthful than margarine --Multigrain foods are good for you --Gluten is harmful --Chocolate is good for you --Raw veggies are more nutritious than cooked --Yogurt improves digestion --Soy milk is more healthful than cow’s milk --Vitamin C fights colds --Vegetarian diets are more healthful than other diets --A caveman diet is ideal Group 3: --Coffee is bad for you --You need eight classes of water a day for good health --Juicing is the best way to get nutrients --Olive old is the most helpful type of vegetable oil --Eggs are bad for your heart --Carbs make you gain weight --Carbs help you lose weight --Fiber prevents colorectal cancer --High-fructose corn syrup is worse for you than sugar --Honey is more healthful than sugar --Aspartame is unsafe --Sea salt is more healthful than regular salt --MSG is harmful --Produce grown locally is most healthful --Acai berries help you lose weight --Kosher meat is more wholesome than conventional meat --Raw milk is better for you than pasteurized milk --Milk is necessary for strong bones --Dairy products promote weight loss --B vitamins give you energy --Multivitamins keep you healthy --Bottled water is safer than tap water --Microwaving in plastic is dangerous --Genetically modified foods are harmful --Irradiated food is unsafe --Detox diets make you healthier Group 4: --Red wine is the most beneficial type of alcohol --Diet soda makes you fat --Saturated fat is bad for your heart --Cinnamon is effective against diabetes --Garlic lower cholesterol --Organic produce is more healthful than conventional produce --Soy wards off cancer --Tomatoes prevent prostate cancer --Grass-fed beef is more healthful than grain-fed beef --Farmed salmon is less healthful than wild-caught salmon --Mercury is sushi is toxic --Most of us need more Vitamin D --Chemicals in French fries cause cancer --Very low calorie diets extend your life How do you think you did? Now go and check out the book and see how your answers match up to the author’s conclusions. Warning: you might have to rethink what you thought was true! Although the author’s final assessment of each of the nutritional claims is by no means the absolute truth (personally, I disagree with quite of a few of his conclusions), he provides the relevant references for you to go and make your own calls. But, the bottom line is that fixating too much on nutrition is just not that nutritious! In the author’s own words: “All the admonitions about which foods we should and shouldn’t consume can make eating a stressful chore. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Using science as your guide, focus on the claims with the greatest credibility and relevance, and tune out the rest. That way, you’ll feel less overwhelmed. While following sound nutritional advice is important for good health, it need not spoil your dinner.” (p. 55) So, read up...then eat up.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Felix

    Enjoyed reading the book. Not only does it serve up useful health information, the author also writes in a humorous manner and each section ends with a funny or witty remark. So the book is not boring to read. In fact I was surprised at how quickly I was able to finish it. Some of the health facts the book claims that really surprised me: 1. MSG is not harmful - some people may be allergic (which accounts for people complaining of headaches after eating Chinese food), but there is no scientific Enjoyed reading the book. Not only does it serve up useful health information, the author also writes in a humorous manner and each section ends with a funny or witty remark. So the book is not boring to read. In fact I was surprised at how quickly I was able to finish it. Some of the health facts the book claims that really surprised me: 1. MSG is not harmful - some people may be allergic (which accounts for people complaining of headaches after eating Chinese food), but there is no scientific evidence that it is harmful. That's news to me! 2. The claim that organic foods are more healthful than conventional food is inconclusive which is great because those organic foods cost a lot of money :-) 3. These too are inconclusive: a. "Grass-Fed Beef Is More Healthful Than Grain-Fed Beef" b. "Kosher Meat Is More Wholesome Than Conventional Meat" c. "Farmed Salmon Is Less Healthful Than Wild-Caught Salmon" The author also suggests ways to steer clear of over hyped claims about miracle foods and supplements. Instead, the author directs the reader to use sound judgment and look up results of scientific trials before believing any of the truth about certain health claims.

  4. 4 out of 5

    M

    This is a good reference to have for when the media or anybody really tells you some farcial or unlikely claim about what a food can do. I like the breakdown of claims as yes, no, half true, or inconclusive. Davis then provides the background or an anecdotal tale followed by the science to eith substatian or debunk the claim. The end is a good tool as it provides a checklist of things to consider when you read about future food claims and curealls. My favorite part may be his refrences section. This is a good reference to have for when the media or anybody really tells you some farcial or unlikely claim about what a food can do. I like the breakdown of claims as yes, no, half true, or inconclusive. Davis then provides the background or an anecdotal tale followed by the science to eith substatian or debunk the claim. The end is a good tool as it provides a checklist of things to consider when you read about future food claims and curealls. My favorite part may be his refrences section. He cites each paper used and organzies them by topic so the reader can go and see the data for themselves.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Huxtable

    Terrific discussions of all the headline food stories of the past decade. Where Davis really impresses is in his discussions of the scientific studies associated with each food claim. Davis tells it straight : who sponsored the study, what kind of study it was, and where the flaws in each study were. He includes in his preface an overview of the types of scientific studies used in the food claims, which is helpful for the non-scientists who freak at every new dangerous story about food in the Terrific discussions of all the headline food stories of the past decade. Where Davis really impresses is in his discussions of the scientific studies associated with each food claim. Davis tells it straight : who sponsored the study, what kind of study it was, and where the flaws in each study were. He includes in his preface an overview of the types of scientific studies used in the food claims, which is helpful for the non-scientists who freak at every new dangerous story about food in the news. And don't worry about microwaving in plastic. But wash your prewashed lettuce.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Pedersen

    it is funny how this book echoed some of my own beliefs about the food industry. I thought it was funny when the author pointed out that a lot of them take advantage of consumers by selling half truths with vague promises. I recommend this book to anyone who diets or is wanting to go on a diet. even people who take supplements to promote healthfulness. you may be surprised at what you find in this little book. if you do pick it up please read the introduction if not the book could mean less than it is funny how this book echoed some of my own beliefs about the food industry. I thought it was funny when the author pointed out that a lot of them take advantage of consumers by selling half truths with vague promises. I recommend this book to anyone who diets or is wanting to go on a diet. even people who take supplements to promote healthfulness. you may be surprised at what you find in this little book. if you do pick it up please read the introduction if not the book could mean less than nothing to you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Facts, facts, facts! Loved it. Enjoy a scientific and factual compilation that helps me know more about concepts I already knew a great deal about. But the science of food and nutrition has always intrigued me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenny K

    The author states in his introduction "some of what you read here will undoubtedly be superseded by new information in the future." This book was published in 2012, and I think it's time for the author to revise.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Another reminder that you can't believe everything you read, especially when the company reporting the information stands to benefit.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    This well-researched, yet light-hearted book addresses many popular claims about nutrition. I appreciated several features of Davis's work. First, he introduces the book with an approachable analysis of nutrition research; he explains a bit about experimental design and which studies carry the most informational value. This analysis then serves as the basis for his ratings of "no," "half-true," "yes," and "inconclusive" as he considers the scientific validity of one claim after another. Second, This well-researched, yet light-hearted book addresses many popular claims about nutrition. I appreciated several features of Davis's work. First, he introduces the book with an approachable analysis of nutrition research; he explains a bit about experimental design and which studies carry the most informational value. This analysis then serves as the basis for his ratings of "no," "half-true," "yes," and "inconclusive" as he considers the scientific validity of one claim after another. Second, he concludes the book with some pointers on how readers can judge for themselves the accuracy of other nutrition claims. Finally, he provides an extensive bibliography of food science and health research backing his evaluations. Consequently, besides answering burning questions about food and health, the book can also save the reader money and suggest beneficial dietary changes. Some costlier foods that are touted as being healthy (or at least healthier) turn out to be on par with their conventional alternatives.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was a great quick read. Robert Davis gave us his updates on the current status of all the health zigzags that have made me personally quite dizzy (his catchy phrase not mine). Got the low down on coffee=good, red wine=good (but would have put the book down if that was bad), vitamin c, gluten free, low carb, fish oil, acai and a multitude of other health do's and don'ts. Except... I have this feeling that by next year he will have to update his book. I would have valued this book more if he This was a great quick read. Robert Davis gave us his updates on the current status of all the health zigzags that have made me personally quite dizzy (his catchy phrase not mine). Got the low down on coffee=good, red wine=good (but would have put the book down if that was bad), vitamin c, gluten free, low carb, fish oil, acai and a multitude of other health do's and don'ts. Except... I have this feeling that by next year he will have to update his book. I would have valued this book more if he used more references for each topic and captured the full scope of research and opinions and provided more biochemical detail. It is an interesting read for health conscious people (mom, sisters). Writing style engaging Great sense of humor Nice dashboard concept for health ratings

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Nutrition reporting meets Mythbusters. This was a quick and easy read in fairly short segments addressing a number of diet and nutrition claims. I wasn't totally sold on all of his conclusions, but for the most part, it seemed well researched and fairly reasonable. He acknowledged that our understanding of nutrition is a moving target and the science is changing all the time. I suspect a couple of things in the book may already be contradicted by new research, but he advises the reader to stay Nutrition reporting meets Mythbusters. This was a quick and easy read in fairly short segments addressing a number of diet and nutrition claims. I wasn't totally sold on all of his conclusions, but for the most part, it seemed well researched and fairly reasonable. He acknowledged that our understanding of nutrition is a moving target and the science is changing all the time. I suspect a couple of things in the book may already be contradicted by new research, but he advises the reader to stay tuned to new studies. I think the most useful part is his explanations of how the media often misinterpret or oversell study results and how to be a discerning consumer of news. He doesn't lay it out explicitly, but weaves it in and out of the narrative.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erik Arnesen

    "Coffee Is Good/Bad for you" tackles several myths and claims on food and nutrition. The book is short - just 197 pages, including referances - and a quick read, but Davis manages to cover a wide range of nutritional claims (I counted 65 of them). For people who are fairly up-to-date on nutrition research, this book has few surprises. None of the conclusions were specially controversial to me, but some will undoubtly react to his take on controversial topics like aspartame, GMO's and the paleo "Coffee Is Good/Bad for you" tackles several myths and claims on food and nutrition. The book is short - just 197 pages, including referances - and a quick read, but Davis manages to cover a wide range of nutritional claims (I counted 65 of them). For people who are fairly up-to-date on nutrition research, this book has few surprises. None of the conclusions were specially controversial to me, but some will undoubtly react to his take on controversial topics like aspartame, GMO's and the paleo diet. All of the chapters come with quite a few references you can check for yourself if you doubt Davis' conclusions.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    I enjoy Q & A style books. The author basically presents a food and health related idea (ex You should drink 8 glasses of water per day), deems it true, false, half-true, or inconclusive (the water example is false) then spends a page or two summarizing what research is out there. The author gave the information in a straightforward way, but sprinkled plenty of his personal humor to make it a more lighthearted read. Many current hot topic were covered and I felt it gave a good overall idea I enjoy Q & A style books. The author basically presents a food and health related idea (ex You should drink 8 glasses of water per day), deems it true, false, half-true, or inconclusive (the water example is false) then spends a page or two summarizing what research is out there. The author gave the information in a straightforward way, but sprinkled plenty of his personal humor to make it a more lighthearted read. Many current hot topic were covered and I felt it gave a good overall idea of what sort of health claims you should and shouldn't believe.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Specialk

    Nice short anecdotes on common food myths. Nothing groundbreaking, and a quick read. The author has a light, self-depreciating essay style which is also readable, but sort of wish he'd whittled it down to a handful of food myths and misconceptions, and provided more in-depth materials on them. Although he's well sourced and everything is cited in the back...I'd rather the author feed it to me (no pun intended) in their terms. Plus, half the misconceptions and myths, I'd never heard before.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    If you have one hour to flip through a book, this one was a decent one. Some of it was stuff I already knew, and some of it was new. You have to know that the book is about the nutrition of certain things, not ethics or environmental impact, etc. I only picked it up because my daughter told me I *had* to pick up a book while we were at the library, but it beat some of the other books that were on the shelf for sure!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lee

    I think this book had just enough humor to offset the facts that the author presented to make it easy to read and digest the information. I like how they explained what different types of research or studies were done and how the results may or may not be skewed due to who presented the study. I will keep these types of things in mind when new stories come out in the news as to a food being good/bad for us. It's constantly changing and sometimes the media blows things out of poportion!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    One way to spot junk is to examine the name of the author. Junk comes with M.D. PhD and other apparently random letters to elicit an authority position. Robert Davis is not an M.D. like other snake oil sellers, he is a heath journalist with a skill for sensational. The book is clearly organized and well structured. But beyond that it is just a collection of 'I know of a study that...' And it is not that well referenced either.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Some sections of the book could have used expansion. I didn't really care for the disregard for animal research. If a product causes tumors in rats, but hasn't shown any harmful effects in humans, should we keep chugging the stuff down? Maybe not. The author relied heavily on randomized studies to decide what nutrition advice was "truth" and threw all other research out the window.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ray Campbell

    Another "it's OK to eat stuff, we aren't as smart as we think" book. With all the prescriptions on what to eat and what not to eat, Davis presents contradictory evidence and explains why it's OK to eat many things that have been demonized. Davis does his homework and points at foods to avoid, but his over arching message is eat in moderation. Fun to read and nice to know coffee is OK.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    I thought it was very good and that the author was fairly intelligent and not afraid to be himself. It felt like a conversation with a teacher and I happen to really like that. It is a solid read with a good bit of learning that you will go through. I would recommend this to anyone as tips on dieting and as an overall pleasant experience.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Taryn

    An interesting take on the food myths you may or may not have heard over the years. Some of them are pretty obvious, but a couple of them surprised me. It's interesting to think about how the food studies that you read come to be...who funds them, for example, and how that could affect the outcome, etc.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ariadna73

    Here is my comment in my Spanish Blog: http://lunairereadings.blogspot.com/2... The book says that it will blow away the most common myths about food; but in reality; it is just another book that repeats all the things we already have heard somewhere else. I didn't find anything new in it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    This is actually quite good but I feel like I would only give it 4 stars if it had a little bit more heft to it. Like seriously you can read this in an hour. There was a bibliography in the back so you would be able to do more in depth research if you wanted more detailed answers, but I wanted more in depth answers for everything. EVERYTHING.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    This book tries to compile years of research into short summaries about which foods are good or bad for you. Some of it really hits the mark, but most of it is inconclusive, leaving the reader to decide. It was interesting, but hardly a go to book for nutritional information.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    This was an entertaining read about nutrition and health. Did you know that our bodies process high fructose corn syrup differently than table sugar? And that may or may not be the reason you gain more weight eating HFCS foods.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    I could not get through this book. The author has clearly bought into the "organic food is healthier than conventional food" myth. I kept laughing out loud after the third or fourth ridiculous reference to the holiness of organic food. Big Organic is certainly proud of him.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brandy Doyle

    Interesting, quick read. And while the claims are that this is a book based on science and is non-biased, he contradicts himself throughout. So, like any health book, as long as you take everything with a grain of salt and healthy skepticism, you'll at least learn something new.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Best thing about this book: the details on the levels of scientific evidence used to back up nutrition claims. Gives the reader another way to figure out whether to believe the media hype about - well, anything, really.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Recommended by Hungry Girl!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.