Hot Best Seller

Poetry of the Gods

Availability: Ready to download

The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1996, 15-21. * Shadows of Death. New York, NY: Del Rey, 2005, 292300.


Compare

The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1996, 15-21. * Shadows of Death. New York, NY: Del Rey, 2005, 292300.

30 review for Poetry of the Gods

  1. 5 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    Poetry and the Gods by H. P. Lovecraft with Anna Helen Crofts Another collaboration. The themes common to some of his other works are dreams and travelling through them. It follows a young woman whose dream enables her to talk to Greek gods. They tell her that poetry is the language of gods. Usually, there is at least an awesome story/an idea behind it all and it makes it fun to read. Here, though, there is no such story. Marcia falls asleep, dreams Greek gods, talks to them and gets snippets Poetry and the Gods by H. P. Lovecraft with Anna Helen Crofts Another collaboration. The themes common to some of his other works are dreams and travelling through them. It follows a young woman whose dream enables her to talk to Greek gods. They tell her that poetry is the language of gods. Usually, there is at least an awesome story/an idea behind it all and it makes it fun to read. Here, though, there is no such story. Marcia falls asleep, dreams Greek gods, talks to them and gets snippets from poetry of Goethe, Keats, Shakespeare and others.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Linton Newton

    The first non-horror story I have read by Lovecraft, though there is still an element of unease throughout the tale. There's a large amount of references to Greek mythology within the work and is the basis for the tale.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I don't think Lovecraft was as good at poetry as he was at writing prose. Yet.. This left me utterly surprised. First of all, there are no elements of horror throughout the story. And this is not a bad thing. It's highly poetical, angelic. Beautiful; as if ripped apart from one of his dreams. There is not much to say, it's short and sweet. Like a bitter candy, it has its bad parts too. If you want to read it only for the poetry, thinking it's a poetic masterpiece, don't get your hopes up. But I don't think Lovecraft was as good at poetry as he was at writing prose. Yet.. This left me utterly surprised. First of all, there are no elements of horror throughout the story. And this is not a bad thing. It's highly poetical, angelic. Beautiful; as if ripped apart from one of his dreams. There is not much to say, it's short and sweet. Like a bitter candy, it has its bad parts too. If you want to read it only for the poetry, thinking it's a poetic masterpiece, don't get your hopes up. But instead, read it for the story, for the idea. 3,90; almost getting to 4, but not really.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Poetry is the language of the gods. A surprisingly lovely tale with a Narnia-like setting and a touch of Poe’s romantic poetry.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

    Poetry is the language of the gods, Greek gods, specifically. Interesting idea, and very flowery prose, but that's about it for me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow", and before "The Crawling Chaos"—two tales that Lovecraft and Winifred Jackson co-wrote with a Greek mythology basis.[2] What Anna Helen Crofts contributed to "Poetry and the Gods" is unknown. Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi reports that she "appeared sporadically in the amateur press, and may have been introduced to [Lovecraft] by Winifred Jackson." Lovecraft's surviving letters do not mention "Poetry and the Gods". In his 1955 essay on the Cthulhu Mythos, Lovecraft scholar George Wetzel compares the messenger god Hermes in "Poetry and the Gods" with Nyarlathotep, the "messenger of Azathoth". Wetzel considers the dream communication used by Hermes to be "the same psychic device used later by Cthulhu to contact his cult followers. The story begins in a drawing room on an April evening "just after the Great War". A young woman, Marcia, is there alone, feeling an "immeasurable gulf that [separates] her soul" from her uninspiring surroundings: 20th-century life and the "strange home" in which she lives. She wonders whether she was born in the wrong age. She leafs through a magazine to look for some soothing poetry, and lands on an atmospheric free verse poem. With its sensually rich images, the poem sends her into a reverie. Marcia believes it to herald a new age. She repeats its words to herself as she drifts off to sleep. Hermes appears before her sleeping body, and confirms that a new age is indeed coming: one in which the gods wake from their own dream-filled sleep, and take action. Hermes carries her to the court of Zeus, where Apollo, Dionysus, the Muses, and the Bacchae also wait. "Long have we… spoken only through our dreams," Zeus tells her, "but the time approaches when our voices shall not be silent. It is a time of awakening and change." He says that the gods have chosen a poet "to blend into one glorious whole all the beauty that the world hath known before, and to write words wherein shall echo all the wisdom and the loveliness of the past." This consummate poet is to be the harbinger of the gods' awakening. He was chosen not only by the gods themselves, but by select poets whom Zeus and Apollo granted immortality and honor. In turn, these six poets come forth and contribute lines of verse: Homer, Dante, Goethe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Keats. They continue until just before dawn, and Hermes carries Marcia back to her house. Years later, Marcia is with the poet foretold by Zeus. When she tells him that his poetry is "fit for the gods", Zeus sends her a vision and declares: "By his word shall thy steps be guided to happiness, and in his dreams of beauty shall thy spirit find all that it craveth."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Oleksandr Fediienko

    Я впевнений, що колись посилався на це коротке оповідання, але не можу згадати, де саме. Тут розповідається про те, як одного разу Марсія зачитується поезією і замріюється. Посланець богів Гермес піднімає її на Парнас, святилище поезії. Там давні боги на чолі з Зевсом дрімають і чекають часу свого повернення. Зевс знайомить її з Гомером, Данте, Шекспіром, Мілтоном, Гете і Кітсом, які були вісниками богів, і наказує чекати появи сьомого поета, який своїм мистецтвом поверне їх на землю. Заслуговують Я впевнений, що колись посилався на це коротке оповідання, але не можу згадати, де саме. Тут розповідається про те, як одного разу Марсія зачитується поезією і замріюється. Посланець богів Гермес піднімає її на Парнас, святилище поезії. Там давні боги на чолі з Зевсом дрімають і чекають часу свого повернення. Зевс знайомить її з Гомером, Данте, Шекспіром, Мілтоном, Гете і Кітсом, які були вісниками богів, і наказує чекати появи сьомого поета, який своїм мистецтвом поверне їх на землю. Заслуговують на увагу розлогі монологи Гермеса і Зевса - зразки поезії в прозі. Доречними також є уривки з творів зазначених поетів.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thor The Redbeard

    4/10

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    Yeah I'm not sure what this was going for. Doesn't sound like Lovecraft at all. Very self-important love letter to poetry and poets, but very lost in itself. One of the few Lovecraft stories I dislike.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    Meh.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julieta Mora

    Magical, spellbounding. It amazed me

  12. 4 out of 5

    Claire Orion

    Un relato escrito junto con Anna Helen Crofts. Palabras mágicas y oníricas, y poesía obsequiada por los dioses. Sólo los soñadores podemos sentir identificados con la protagonista. <3

  13. 4 out of 5

    Santiago

    I just like it, nothing more, nothing less

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Corr

    Was very interesting and i really enjoyed it. Unlike anything else i had read by him but i am still only getting into Lovecraft,

  15. 4 out of 5

    ΚΩΣΤΑΣ ΤΡΟΥΚΗΣ

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jafetkami

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andra A.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark Goodwin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Madalina

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justerini

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mai

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maggie lml

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fatih

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan A.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Greer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Stephens

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mrytle Savo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nichole Bennett

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leah Markum

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.