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The Whole Family Cookbook: Celebrate the goodness of locally grown foods

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There's no better way to teach your children to eat fresh, healthy, organic food than with recipes you can cook and eat together! Written by the founder of San Francisco's premier children's cooking school and award-winning, green-parenting blogger Michelle Stern, this cookbook gives your family the resources you need to cook delicious, local food in any season including: P There's no better way to teach your children to eat fresh, healthy, organic food than with recipes you can cook and eat together! Written by the founder of San Francisco's premier children's cooking school and award-winning, green-parenting blogger Michelle Stern, this cookbook gives your family the resources you need to cook delicious, local food in any season including: Practical advice like how to pick the best of local and natural food without spending too much time or money. Color-coded instructions that guide kids of all ages through age-appropriate steps in every recipe. More than 75 organic, family-friendly recipes and beautiful 4-color photos that will get everyone excited about what's for dinner! Whether you're cooking Summertime Kabobs on a balmy June evening or Sweet and Savory Turnovers for a toasty winter breakfast, your family will learn to love the wholesome food - and priceless memories - you can make together.


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There's no better way to teach your children to eat fresh, healthy, organic food than with recipes you can cook and eat together! Written by the founder of San Francisco's premier children's cooking school and award-winning, green-parenting blogger Michelle Stern, this cookbook gives your family the resources you need to cook delicious, local food in any season including: P There's no better way to teach your children to eat fresh, healthy, organic food than with recipes you can cook and eat together! Written by the founder of San Francisco's premier children's cooking school and award-winning, green-parenting blogger Michelle Stern, this cookbook gives your family the resources you need to cook delicious, local food in any season including: Practical advice like how to pick the best of local and natural food without spending too much time or money. Color-coded instructions that guide kids of all ages through age-appropriate steps in every recipe. More than 75 organic, family-friendly recipes and beautiful 4-color photos that will get everyone excited about what's for dinner! Whether you're cooking Summertime Kabobs on a balmy June evening or Sweet and Savory Turnovers for a toasty winter breakfast, your family will learn to love the wholesome food - and priceless memories - you can make together.

41 review for The Whole Family Cookbook: Celebrate the goodness of locally grown foods

  1. 4 out of 5

    sarah gilbert

    The book is approachable and energetic, not just for those sort of hardcore locavore environmental activists like some of us are, but also for the -- as Michelle describes herself -- "multitasking working parent and child chauffeur" intent on proving "you don't have to be a stay-at-home parent to cook with your kids." The recipes provide a lot of what a writer last week called "serv[ing] as pitchman for the underdogs: the fruits, the vegetables; the foods without preservatives or ingredients I c The book is approachable and energetic, not just for those sort of hardcore locavore environmental activists like some of us are, but also for the -- as Michelle describes herself -- "multitasking working parent and child chauffeur" intent on proving "you don't have to be a stay-at-home parent to cook with your kids." The recipes provide a lot of what a writer last week called "serv[ing] as pitchman for the underdogs: the fruits, the vegetables; the foods without preservatives or ingredients I couldn't pronounce." Honestly, the photo of "Yummy Strawberry Yogurt Parfait" was enough for Everett to demand it, immediately! And some of the names, like "Wish-for-a-Fish Pasta" and "There's a Turkey in Your Pocket" may inspire if your child is, like Truman (six), charmed by such cute things. "That's so funny!" he'll tell me over and over, repeating the name of the dish. "You were like, there's a turkey in my pocket! And I was like, hehe." The recipes all come with neat color-coded markers that show which steps would be appropriate to let children ages 2-3, 4-6, 7-10, and 11 and up help with. I found they're pretty on target; when we made the Baked Apple Puff, a sweet variation on an old fave, the Dutch baby pancake, Everett (eight) and Monroe (three) helped along with their respective age groups. While my approach toward ingredients is a little more whole-hog than the recipes in the book (I prefer to make a pot of black beans with orange peel than to buy a can; I prefer maple syrup over brown sugar; I haven't used ground turkey in years, preferring ground beef and pork I get in large quantities from local farmers and keep in my freezer), I affirm utterly Michelle's commitment to spending our cooking time with our kids making that good food to grow on with whole, local and fresh ingredients, instead of focusing all our bonding time on chocolate chip cookies and microwave popcorn (which seems to be the prevailing cultural attitude). There are a lot of books on cooking with or for kids on the bookstore shelves right now, and this is a rare one that avoids judgment or preachiness, while at the same time embracing the concept of involving our kids in good food decisions (no vegetable hiding or sweet pretenses here). You'll probably be happy to see that Michelle doesn't call repeatedly for using organic ingredients, making a small plug for it in the prologue and leaving it at that. And I think the bar for most of our families is pretty low; if we get two or three new fruit- and veggie-packed recipes into our weekly rotation, we're thrilled! This book easily sails over that bar with plenty of potential.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Isaacson

    A and I went through this last night and flagged the recipes we thought to try. We came up with about a dozen. And a number of them involve strawberries. It is November. So much for "Locally Grown Foods"! My freezer will no doubt be stuff with frozen fruit when I next come home from grocery shopping. The rundown on what we tried: Yummy Strawberry Yogurt Parfait - girls really liked building their parfaits. And had seconds. Banana Sunshine Smoothie - girls also liked making smoothie breakfast, thoug A and I went through this last night and flagged the recipes we thought to try. We came up with about a dozen. And a number of them involve strawberries. It is November. So much for "Locally Grown Foods"! My freezer will no doubt be stuff with frozen fruit when I next come home from grocery shopping. The rundown on what we tried: Yummy Strawberry Yogurt Parfait - girls really liked building their parfaits. And had seconds. Banana Sunshine Smoothie - girls also liked making smoothie breakfast, though this made more than I expected. Sweet and Salty Glazed Bacon - It was fine but I would have preferred plain bacon. However my FIL had some and wanted to know what I'd done - he liked it. I did like using the oven though, just pop it in then continue getting ready while it cooked. Baked Apple Puff - It tasted good but was just too different for the girls. There's Turkey in my Pocket - I was the only person who didn't whine about it. Salty Pretzel Pillows - while it took a big chunk of my day making these, they are pretty popular in the house. Turkey Toes - these weren't bad! Girls "gobbled" them up. Course I was also calling them chicken nuggets... Pretzel Coated Chicken - I made nugget sized pieces. Girls ate these up too. Couscous Salad with Apricots, Ginger, and Pine Nuts - this was not popular. They would have preferred plain couscous. Patriotic Fruit Salad - I used frozen instead of fresh fruit, so it turned out a little different. But girls did like it. Frozen Choco Bananas - made them, haven't tried them though. Apple Crisp with Vanilla Sauce - "Too much lemon" was the complaint. Flourless Chocolate Cake - we might die eating this and not in a good way. The middle turned out not quite cooked. And I would try using just 6 eggs instead of 8. Also, this was really too much liquid for my food processor.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marcy

    The subtitle of this book is Celebrate the Goodness of Locally Grown Foods. That alone grabbed my attention right away. I love that there is a cookbook dedicated to that mission. We have been trying to make some dietary changes at our house, including eating more locally grown foods. Michelle's focus on using fresh, locally grown foods is not only practical but has inspired us all to eat a little healthier. Ben loves to cook with me, so he was also excited to try out some of the recipes. This coo The subtitle of this book is Celebrate the Goodness of Locally Grown Foods. That alone grabbed my attention right away. I love that there is a cookbook dedicated to that mission. We have been trying to make some dietary changes at our house, including eating more locally grown foods. Michelle's focus on using fresh, locally grown foods is not only practical but has inspired us all to eat a little healthier. Ben loves to cook with me, so he was also excited to try out some of the recipes. This cookbook is chock full of recipes that are not only kid-friendly to eat, but also perfect for kids to help cook. In fact, at age 10, many of these recipes would be fairly easy for Ben to follow alone, with me just peaking in over his shoulder. For those of you with several children, you will love Michelle's age-appropriate feature. With each step of each recipe, there is a color-coded key to let you know for what age that step is appropriate. For example, with eggs, your six-year old could crack the eggs, your three-year old could lightly beat them and pour them into the bowl, and your ten-year old could melt butter in the microwave. For purposes of this review, the first recipe we tried was a Baked Apple Puff. Ben and I made this for our "breakfast for dinner" night and it was perfect. Not to sweet, and filling and delicious. It was the perfect recipe to do together as well, because Ben could do almost everything by himself, which really boosted his confidence in the kitchen. I wish I had a picture to share. We discovered our camera battery was dead after we made the recipe. Ben describes it as a "stuffed pancake, sprinkled with cinnamon sugar." That's a pretty good description.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Good ideas but nothing wowed me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Love these recipes and the steps are easily broken down into age groups ( ages 4-5 steps are blue for example). Can't wait to try these!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie Webb

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joia

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hattie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ames

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maryanne Lucas

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caneel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hunter

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Christine

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Jones

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lesyshen

  25. 5 out of 5

    trachelle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leighann

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wcplanfi

  29. 5 out of 5

    J

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  31. 4 out of 5

    Beth Diiorio

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  33. 5 out of 5

    Escroston

  34. 4 out of 5

    Cera Mcintire

  35. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  36. 4 out of 5

    Isa

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Lewis

  38. 5 out of 5

    Mirela Cracana

  39. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  40. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  41. 4 out of 5

    Sreevidhya

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